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Director for the new "Star Wars" Movie announced
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Aragalen the Green
Gondor


Jan 25 2013, 12:21am

Post #1 of 66 (893 views)
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Director for the new "Star Wars" Movie announced Can't Post

This is pretty Off Topic! But I thought interesting enough to share.

The new director is...J.J. Abrams. http://social.entertainment.msn.com/...61-82d4-f1e837776758

Any comments?

There it is: dwarves are not heroes, but calculating folk with a great idea of the value of money; some are tricky and treacherous and pretty bad lots; some are not, but are decent enough people like Thorin and Company, if you don't expect too much.


SirDennisC
Half-elven


Jan 25 2013, 3:14am

Post #2 of 66 (341 views)
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Does this mean [In reply to] Can't Post

the long war between Trekkers and Star Wars fans may finally be over?


Aragalen the Green
Gondor


Jan 25 2013, 3:26am

Post #3 of 66 (319 views)
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There's a war? [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm both a Star Wars and Star Trek fan! It ought to be interesting to see what Abrams comes up with.

Actually I prefer Trekkie over Trekker, since I've watched the series since the beginning (1966). Wink

There it is: dwarves are not heroes, but calculating folk with a great idea of the value of money; some are tricky and treacherous and pretty bad lots; some are not, but are decent enough people like Thorin and Company, if you don't expect too much.


Eruonen
Tol Eressea


Jan 25 2013, 5:32am

Post #4 of 66 (333 views)
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I actually think it required other people than George Lucas [In reply to] Can't Post

to salvage the franchise and I think it is in good hands. JJ Abrams Start Trek movie was very good and the trailer for the upcoming Star Trek film, with Benedict Cumberpatch playing a bad guy (his voice sounds brilliantly evil...perfect for Smaug too) is quite thrilling.

I have not read any of the Star Wars novels by various authors, does anyone know if they tend to be more serious than the movies?

http://en.wikipedia.org/..._of_Star_Wars_novels


(This post was edited by Eruonen on Jan 25 2013, 5:34am)


Starling
Half-elven


Jan 25 2013, 7:20am

Post #5 of 66 (268 views)
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The numbers are baaaad! // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Otaku-sempai
Half-elven


Jan 25 2013, 4:06pm

Post #6 of 66 (262 views)
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SW novels and comics [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I have not read any of the Star Wars novels by various authors, does anyone know if they tend to be more serious than the movies?



I've only read a handful (or two) of Star Wars novels, being a bit more familiar with the comics (both those from Marvel and Dark Horse). With a few exceptions, they do tend to keep a more consistantly serious tone than the film series was able to manage. Brian Daly's Han Solo series set in the Corporate Sector during Han & Chewie's smuggling days kept a fun and light tone for the most part.

'There are older and fouler things than Orcs in the deep places of the world.' - Gandalf the Grey, The Fellowship of the Ring


Arandiel
Grey Havens

Jan 25 2013, 9:48pm

Post #7 of 66 (268 views)
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So it's camera-shake and lens flare for you, Luke Skywalker! [In reply to] Can't Post

The making-of extra on the Star Trek DVDs has a couple segments on how in love with those two things Abrams is.

I just don't like the frenetic feel of his work on Star Trek, and I'm guessing he'll do the same thing in Star Wars. On the other hand, he'll probably find a girlfriend for Luke, so it's a bit of a wash.


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Arandiel
Grey Havens

Jan 25 2013, 11:13pm

Post #8 of 66 (272 views)
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No, no war. Star Trek fans don't do 'wars' [In reply to] Can't Post

Tongue


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Magpie
Immortal


Jan 25 2013, 11:15pm

Post #9 of 66 (227 views)
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frenetic seems to be a popular style these days [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't like it all that much either. I think the first few times I encountered that style, it seemed at least 'fresh' and suited the mood.

Now it's just a cool thing to do but I can't easily track the action when it's so crazy.


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Arandiel
Grey Havens

Jan 25 2013, 11:53pm

Post #10 of 66 (239 views)
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Maybe that's the point... [In reply to] Can't Post

I'd hazard a guess that all that frenetic stuff can obscure lots of plot holes, lack of character development, bad dialogue and dumbed-down stories.

Of course, I wouldn't want a return to 2001: a Space Odyssey-style ponderousness, either. A happy medium - that'd be nice!


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Ardamírë
Valinor


Jan 26 2013, 12:38am

Post #11 of 66 (230 views)
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I've not seen anything by Abrams [In reply to] Can't Post

But I'm looking forward to it. From what I've heard, he seems to be a proficient director. Since the story isn't his, I'm not that worried. Lucas wrote the treatment for episodes 7-9, and Michael Arndt (who wrote the fantastic Toy Story 3 script) is doing the script.

The only things I'm worried about are the lens flares and shaky cam that I've heard he's known for. Please leave them both out of this! I cannot stand the shaky cam phenomenon. It's stupid. Why would I want to watch a film where I can't tell what's going on? That was one of my major problems with The Hunger Games. I couldn't tell what was happening half the time. If I can't focus, I'm gonna be pulled straight out of the film. Please leave that for something I'm not invested in.

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


SirDennisC
Half-elven


Jan 26 2013, 12:53am

Post #12 of 66 (258 views)
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Now I get it... your previous post was kind of insulting. [In reply to] Can't Post

LaughAngelic


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Jan 26 2013, 1:29am

Post #13 of 66 (237 views)
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I believe that was deliberate. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
That was one of my major problems with The Hunger Games. I couldn't tell what was happening half the time.



Well, of course shakey cam is *always* deliberate - but with The Hunger Games the shakey cam was used, particularly in the early cornucopia scene, to make the violence between children harder to follow so that the audiences didn't have to linger over it.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


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Ardamírë
Valinor


Jan 26 2013, 1:58am

Post #14 of 66 (220 views)
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It was deliberate, unfortunately. [In reply to] Can't Post

Obviously, there's no way it couldn't be. It would have been one thing if it were used sparingly and mostly for the Cornucopia, but it wasn't. It was used all throughout the film for all sorts of scenes.

And honestly, if the audience doesn't want to see children killing each other, they should go see a film about children killing each other. I'm in no way advocating all out blood and guts, but just being able to follow the images on the screen would have been nice.

I just hope that Abrams avoids the shaky cam, since I've heard he uses it. It doesn't fit with the rest of the Star Wars movies, and I don't like it - two good reasons for me not to want it used. Smile

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


Starling
Half-elven


Jan 26 2013, 2:17am

Post #15 of 66 (236 views)
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The first shaky cam thing I really remember [In reply to] Can't Post

is NYPD Blue. I loved that show, but I swear I would get motion sickness watching it.


Ardamírë
Valinor


Jan 26 2013, 2:37am

Post #16 of 66 (210 views)
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Yeah, it's horrible. [In reply to] Can't Post

I cannot for the life of me understand it's appeal. It's far too difficult to watch. Gimme a good ol' fashion steady cam and we're good to go Smile

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


zarabia
Grey Havens


Jan 26 2013, 2:58am

Post #17 of 66 (215 views)
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But who will write the screenplay? [In reply to] Can't Post

The best of the Lucas films was The Empire Strikes Back, and I think that's in large part due to the fact that Lawrence Kasdan helped write the screenplay. Lucas' dialogue in the prequels is just painful.

"The question isn't where, Constable, but when." - Inspector Spacetime


Ardamírë
Valinor


Jan 26 2013, 3:21am

Post #18 of 66 (217 views)
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Already confirmed [In reply to] Can't Post

It's going to be Michael Arndt. He wrote the script for Toy Story 3 which was an excellent movie, IMO. He also wrote the script for Little Miss Sunshine for which he won an Oscar.

So yeah, I'm not worried about the script Smile

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


Sunflower
Valinor

Jan 26 2013, 3:47am

Post #19 of 66 (223 views)
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I suppose [In reply to] Can't Post

the idea about shaky-cam is to give something a documentary feel, the ultimate "you-are-there" real-time experience. Like you were spying on something through a screen of bushes, something forbidden, and trying to keep your camera steady. If used sparingly and correctly, it can achive a startling immediacy and poignant effect (watch the opening scenes of "Citizen Kane" for an example of this, when we see a brief glimpse through a screen of waving tree branches of CFK being pushed around the secluded grounds of his mansion in a wheelchair). It is now de rigeur, it seems, for the generation of popular film directors who came of age watching MTV in its infancy in the 80's. A pity. A whole generation of film-makers and TV directors who have lose sight of the subtle intricacies and language of a camera.

Add to this the fact that Mr. Shaky Cam publicly made it very clear that he did NOT want to direct this and probably only came on board after being offered God knows how much money...he was, I'm sure, Disney's first choice...they wanted THE "hot" director who succesfully rebooted the other big sci-fi franchise, or no-one at all...and the story treatment is Lucas's, unfortunately. If Disney was successful in getting their way in this important matter..they didn't want to take a chance with someone new and exciting...now their next big thing is, they want to stick to the familar....like Star Trek not being rebooted with a fresh cast of exciting new characters, (another "Next Generation", which is what I would have preferred; gee, people weren't afraid to take risks in the '90s, and we are all infinetlely richer for it) but using another reincarnation of the same old same old, (Kirk, Spock, etc even at the expense of trashing the entire ST timeline from the '60's on)..you know they have stated that they want Mark, Carrie, and 70-yr-old Harry Ford back onscreen (not sitting at a table looking all Elder Statesman-like but, I'm sure, running around corridors Indy 4-style shooting a blaster. God help me. God help us.) Mark, I'd like to see and he could be in Jedi Master mode, echoes of Old Ben, perfectly acceptable. But Carrie in Mon Mothma mode, after a lifetime repudiating Leia, would be not just creepy but sad, and as for Harrison..I wont contemplate.

If you knew that the director and the leads of the cast were, behind the scenes, enthusiastic, in love with and thus fully invested in their project, then any hints of artistic awkwardness or other issues could be overcome. But knowing beforehand that this will probably be labor of reasons other than love dampens excitement over this project for me. That, and a firnly held belief that the current incarnation of Disney is corporate behemoth that poisons almost anything it touches. They're currently in the process of destroying Pixar, now that they have direct hold of it (look at Pixar's last 2 movies, Cars 2 and Brave.) If this had been the Disney of 20 yrs ago under Katzenberg, a genuine "movie man" (one of the last of that almsost-dead breed at the major studios) I'd feel a lot better. But I don't. The only thing that could possibly be worse than Lucas fiddling with his own legacy is a huge corporate entity controlled by bean-counters, incapable these days of a single origional idea, tearing it apart. The "creatives" will be under Igor's laser eye and I'll betcha Lucas will excercise his "advisor" role to its FULLEST capacity. I'd want neither in control of this at all, IMO.

SW may be written all over JJ's past work, but if he were a real fan he'd have jumped at this as the challenge of a lifetime. I wonder who the cast wll be? is there an attitude out there that working on a SW film can be a career-killer? Will JJ want to sign on for a trilogy if this is succesful (dumb question...it's like TH....regardless of quality, a license to print money.

Give me a director who would be like David Lynch. For all its flaws, visually speaking, he did a fantastic job with Dune. It had that appropraitely classic grand look and old-fashioned feel. SW woul IMO benefit from a move away from Lucas's 'faster, more intense." IMO it should look and feel like the Classic it has now become...one of the Great stories.


Starling
Half-elven


Jan 26 2013, 4:32am

Post #20 of 66 (190 views)
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You get used to it, I think [In reply to] Can't Post

Or at least, I have. I tolerate it pretty well now, and often like it when it is used in context to give a certain feel, and not overdone.
But I have strong memories of having to shut my eyes at times all those years ago when I was watching that show!

I am more affected by realistic ocean movement on screen. I am very prone to motion sickness, and felt very ill during Master and Commander, and also in parts of Life of Pi.


zarabia
Grey Havens


Jan 26 2013, 4:33am

Post #21 of 66 (205 views)
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Oooh! Yay! [In reply to] Can't Post

That's my biggest concern allayed. I've only seen bits of TS III, but what I saw, I really enjoyed. Little Miss Sunshine was fantastic. SmileSmile

"The question isn't where, Constable, but when." - Inspector Spacetime


Sunflower
Valinor

Jan 26 2013, 4:52am

Post #22 of 66 (204 views)
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Novels [In reply to] Can't Post

On the whole, I find some of the novels to be much better than some of the films:). Some are written by accomplished sci-fi authors like Timothy Zahn and are great reads in their own right, not just good on the SW list. I used to collect the novels back when I had much more disposable income, read: ie in college:) and after. I've read pretty much all of what was published before this past decade, but I've found that within the past 8 o 10 yrs, with the exception of children's author Jude Watson and Timotyh Zahn, the quality of the writing has diminished, until some series/stories are little more than fleshed-out treatments of film scripts, it seems. Here are my recommendations, in order:

1) In order to get an idea of the quality of sci-fi writing then to now, first read the origional classic novelizations of the SW origional trilogy, by Bian Daley, Allen Dean Foster and Donald Glut, respectively. Ironically, I;ve recently seen these sold at Barnes and Noble in a single "coffee'-table"style hardcover, with the "Classics." LOL. But oddly inspiring nvertheless...

2)"Splinter of the Minds Eye". An old classic with a much-debated Darh Vader storyline that went against the Prequels storyline. A cult classic, you could say.

3)To get a sense of the excitement of the rebirth of the SW franchise, that led to the Prequels being made, "The Thrawn Trilogy" by Timothy Zahn. Published from 91-93. Then, the "Hand of Thrawn" dualogy, further down the list. Also by Zahn. Heck, anything this guy ever wrote. Some of the best writign of the entire SW universe. he's become the "prestiege author" of the SW Universe....whenever a Big Important Plotline needs a story, they ask him to write it. (Like Luke getting married for instance. many fans want to see Zahn's novels onscreen and even Entertainment Weekly had an article that examined Zahn's plotlines in detail, and said they wanted to see Mara Jade onscreen. Which is why I am upset that Lucas isn't involved with the films in any way, except that his "origional" stories involving Luke Han and Leia will be used. this habit REALLY iritiates fans, who suspect that Lucas allows these novels to be written so he can makemoney off them, then he goes and writes a script that makes sure to refute the storylines of the novles in his movies. Storylines that are vastly superior to his scripts. Since he is such a stickler for copyright and useage of plots ans characters, we have assumed that his allowing these to be written makes them "canon", but then he oges and writes his own version. He could just leave the issues alone, and pretend that (like Peter jackson with the "timeline" issues in the LOTR films--like Frodo leaving Bag End, or the unseen eriod betwen Brandywine Bridge and Bree, he just lets it hang, like "there's nothing to suggest this did or didn;t happen." We wish Lucas would "leave things blank" ina simailrvei, but NO< he HAS to MAKE SURE in the Prequels that EVERYTHING the fans wrote was DEAD WRONG. It's a huge issue and a major reason why fans have los faith in Lucas, though the media doesn;t talk about it as much as the prequels. But we take this stff VERY seriously... it's like the Tolkien Universe being written in reverse, like The Professor writing a film script that...well, this is a can of worms.
But be prepared for new films to suggest that Han and Leia never married, or that Luke will die a virgin.) Only half kidding.

4)the children's series by Jude Watson. She's a FANTASTIc author, and all her books are riveting. They may be kid's books, but the stories are great, and really have surpisingly thought-provoking plots and unforgettable characers.
A-Jedi Apprentice series (this deals with 13-yr old Obi-wan, read the whole series)
B-Jedi Quest series(this deals with 13-yr-old Anakin, apprenticed to grown-up Obi-wan, really poignant stories, considering what happens between them in future)

5)Rogue Planet (this deals with Anakin right before the Jude watson stories, he;s around 9 or 10, a realy great spooky mystery, that builds to a surprisng conclusion)

6)The Han Solo Trilogy--Han's life story up until the 1st SW movie. This is among my faves. Han is written as a wonderful Oliver Twist-type character, vey Dickensian, and has a fantastic characters. Another series fans want to see onscreen.

This is fr starters. The list goes on....


(This post was edited by Sunflower on Jan 26 2013, 5:01am)


zarabia
Grey Havens


Jan 26 2013, 5:48am

Post #23 of 66 (199 views)
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I read Splinter of the Mind's Eye [In reply to] Can't Post

when it first came out. Though I missed Han, I thought it was great. I expected ESB to go along the lines of Splinter, but with maybe a Han Solo storyline added in. Needless to say, I was pretty gobsmacked by the revelations in ESB. I actually read the novelization before seeing the film; I just couldn't resist. It's just as well that I did, though. I took the whole, "Luke, I am your father" thing pretty hard. TongueBlush I would have had to leave the theater with a popcorn box over my head. Laugh

I never read any of the other SW novels. I think I picked one up at one time that had Han and Leia married with kids and wasn't interested. I didn't like the Dune books once they focused more on the kids, and I was afraid it would be the same with the SW novels. But your descriptions sound interesting.

Anyway, I didn't know Splinter was considered a cult classic. As much as I enjoyed it, I hadn't thought about it in a long time. I'll have to add it to my re-read list. Smile

"The question isn't where, Constable, but when." - Inspector Spacetime

(This post was edited by zarabia on Jan 26 2013, 5:49am)


Sunflower
Valinor

Jan 26 2013, 6:32am

Post #24 of 66 (210 views)
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A further thought [In reply to] Can't Post

And then I'll leave this thread alone....
But since I was nodding off over the keyboard and my other post was unintelligibleTongue here goes...

To explain the issue over the novels and continuity. And fan concerns about a script based on an "origional story" GL treatment (as has been quoted by Disney) for the new films. This is a much bigger issue than most non-fans realize, and the handling of this issue over the yrs is one of the major easons why many fans have lost faith in Lucas. I'm surprised the media has not explored this issue more directly, as it is a HUGE undercurrent boiling up in the fan blogosphere over the yrs.

Interest in SW had never really died down among the die-hard faithful over the yrs after Return of the Jedi came out, but nobody expected more fims to come out. All fell silent from Lucasfilm in the late 80's and SW went off the radar. The cult classic "Splinter of the Mind's Eye" came out, there were a few comics and a brief kid's TV cartoon series (all Lucas-approved, of course) in the mid-80's, but that was it. Then, in 1991, Timothy Zahn published "Heir To The Empire", the first of the SW novels and the first in what is now called the "Thrawn Trilogy" (Admiral Thrawn being the baddie in these books, and another character fans have wanted to see onscreen.) Not only the storyline excited fans (it was looked on as a sequel to ROTJ and featured a Han and Leia married and expecting twins, among other major plot points) but the other really big deal was that, after a series of attempted knockoffs, this was the first time that Lucasfilm (by which we mean, of course Lucas himself, since nothing "officially" went ahead at that point without his say-so, and he was just as zeaous about non-approved product then as now--he always was as bad as the Tolkien Estate) ...

This was the fime something like this came out and wasn't pulled off the market, it was *fully authorized* by Lucasfilm.It became one of the year's fictins bestsellers, not just sci-fi but in general, in '91, it became a huge cultural event. The 2 sequels sold just as well, and the SW book industry was born. Lucas was reportedly very surprised at the reaction, and he has said that it was at that point that he began to entertain the notion of making Films 1,2 and 3 in his 9-volume saga (it was origionally 12 but got pared down to 9, and then to 6..or so we thought.) I remember reading interviews where he talked about the reactin to the first books at the time. He knew he still had the potential audience for the films at that point, now he had to wait for the technolgoy to catch up.

In the meantime, as the novels multiplied and a kind of Tolkenian-style SW Universe was built in reverse (the SW Galaxy being fleshed out from the movies to ultimately include hundreds of planets, each with their own centuries and even milennia of history--a real First Age, 2nd Age, etc) one question was paramount in the minds of fans: the issue of "canon." Since Lucas had given his tacit (unspoken) blessing--it was assumed--to the first books, with their plotlines (how could it be otherwise, since as I said he had been as bad as the Tolkien Estate--or WB--on cracking down on "other stories" whether they made money or not?) was everything that fas wrote "canon" too? This was a huge issue b/c Lucas, while affecting aloofness from the progress of the novels, neither affirming nor denying anything, nontheless took great interest in them over the years. He reportedly read most of them, and was aware of the general plotlines of those he didn't read. He appointed a "Continuity Editor" at Lucasfilm whose sole job it was to educate each new SW author where in the timeline and placeline of the "Expanded Universe" they'd be writing, and it became a huge headache for later authors not to have plotlines conflict, as they began to overlap and characters were referenced in the the course of their works. I'm told the trek novels are something like this, but I'm not sure if Gene Roddenberry was as involved, even indirectly, with the Trek publushing industry while he was alive, or if fans put as much importance with the trek novels.)

Fans grew to assume, over the years, that Lucas's idirect involement with the publishing arm of Lucasfilm, coupled with his silence on the issue of canon,meant he had given tacit blessing to the plotlines. Dark Horse (I think they were the comic licnesees at the time) published, in 1996, an issue that became a hot collector's item, that graced a lot of bookshop and comic stands--I have a copy myself, though I don;t collect comics)--it featured on the cover an image of the wedding ceremony of Luke Skywalker and Mara Jade; and George Lucas, who had over the years explicitely blocked off "time periods" that authors were forbidden to publish stories set in b/c, they correctly guessed, they'd be dealt with in future SW films, and who had over the yrs sued or had yanked off he shelves the works of authors and others who made money from plotlines he didn't like--well, when *this* ultimate image hit the newsstands, George Lucas didn't bat an eyelash.

After that, fans gave up trying to ask him what was canon and "can we do this?" and whatnot. They took his continuing silence fo tacit approval, or at least, a lack of denial. They assumed he had what I call a Jacksonian attitude (I'll just keep silent and skip over this, b/c he/they have said/written it, but I can pretend it happened but I didn' show it." )

Turns out we fans made the fatl mistake of assuming that assuming that George Lucas cared about fans--that we had earned some resepct from him for revivng interest in his franchise and making him so much money.

Now, an author or creator of a franchise can do as he or she wishes. It's his/her work. Nobody owes any obligation to anyone for anything. But do assume that a director appreciates his fans and followers who take his work that seriously, and he could not fail to know how seriusly we took it. It was his right to refute or deny anything he himself wrote, as well as his liberty to change his own storyline. But the complicated relationship that developed between the fans ad Lucas in the early 90's and beyond, due to the novels, wasn't an ordinary one. For example it wasn't as if we were ttally ignored. Lucas asked author Timothy Zahn if he could use the planet Coruscant from "Heir to the Empire" for the films, and so they weren;t strangers. This important fact was noted too by fans.

Okay, I could go on and on. But anyone familar with the making of Lucas's films will know the ugly truth thar many of Luca's s iconic creations were not his. At least, not on paper. For example, he didn't design Yoda....someone else did. And on and on. That, too, is a film director's perogative. Bit when thousands of fans over the years collaberate in building the SW Universe carefully one brick at a time, lovingly and with deep feeling, and they are led to belive that they are a part of the telling of this wonderful story....well, when the director fills the Prequels with dozens of explicit references that refute everything you wrote (often to the deteriment of the film's plot!) thus reversing, without warning, his policy of "silence"....he could have taken the time to do what he had previously done: "blocked off" that partculat character or plotline or time period and told authors: "don[t write aobut that, b/c that might be something I talk about in a future film." he didnt do that for the Prequel period. With the result that we got the surprised like Death star's origion, Midi-clhlorians, Jedi forbidden to have families....(a HUGE GAPING plot conflict!!!) made us look like fools. No,not fools...we felt insulted, as if Lucas had kicked us in the face.

Now comes word that Lucas's last involvement with the new SW films, will be as "story advisor" to a plot outline he wrote, that deals with the older Luke, Han and Leia. Which of course was the focus of his origional story treatment decades ago. But how many of us believe that the plotline of the Prequels was the same as what he wrote in 1974? Many fans thought he'd either forgotten what he had written or had cynically discarded it. I fear the same many be in store here, only the premise behind this very publicly stated "ORIGIONAL" storyline is to kick us fans in the teeth again, after making money off us for decades--to make sure we fans know that the sequel storyline that bagan with "Heir To The Empire" WASN't "authorized" at all, that at the end of the day we fans are not going to be acknowledged in any way, not even in tiny manner Jackson did by resonding over the course of LOTr by putting littl thingd we loved in there (like a glimse of "Figwit") .

It's one thing to talk midichlorians, celibacy and virgin births, for imprtant but distant characters--we hadn;t gotten to "know" little Anakin from a SW author for years by that point. It affected us, but it was only intellectual rage. It's quite another thing to (as I fear) put a Sequel plotline up onscreen that makes it very explicitely clear that beloved characters from the novels that we had come to know and love for decades, characters that we could practically see in Technicolor and were hoping that Lucas would even give up Lucasfilm or movies be made afer he was dead, just so we could see these people onscreen someday (the way Tolkien fans long to see the Sil onscreen) will likely NEVER be seen now. We suspect Lucas stressed this "completely origional" story to Disney so that, osnce again, he could insult the fans by making it very clear that chaacters like Mara jade and Han and Leia and Luke's children did not and could NEVER exist.

Since I'd say roughly HALF of the dozens and dozens of SW novels, and comics, both for adults and for children, deal with the spouse and progeny of Luke, Han and Leia, you do not know what a unbelievable sense of anger this is is going to cause among fans...


Sunflower
Valinor

Jan 26 2013, 6:54am

Post #25 of 66 (179 views)
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I haven't. [In reply to] Can't Post

I just don't see it as serving the purpose it is used for--being "realistic." Our eyeballs don't swim in our heads. We see in "point and shoot." Cool

I'll leave it at that...:)

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