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SCOD: The choice of Arwen

Silwen_Peredhil
Rivendell


Aug 21 2013, 5:42pm

Post #1 of 5 (792 views)
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SCOD: The choice of Arwen Can't Post

Welcome to the next Screencap Of The Day.


Here are the images:




Full-sized images can be found here and here.

What I like is the way these pictures are almost mirror image to each other with the positioning of the characters, the plants being in the foreground and the house in the background.



What struck me throughout the entire trilogy (and I am even detecting it now in the Hobbit) is that in almost all the scenes that involve the elves there are moments where the camera is zoomed out and it is as though the audience is peering in like children at the elves (a little like Frodo and Sam when they see the woodelves). In other scenes with men of dwarves the audience is usually made to feel much more part of the scene. I assume this is deliberate rather than coincidence, possibly to emphasise the fact that the elves are ethereal compared to any other creature in Middle Earth.

1. Do you think this is why they have done this? Do you like the way they have done this?

2. Look at the colours in each scene. Symbolically what do think is being conveyed here?

3. A question for costume lovers. What do you think of the costumes in this scene and how they help portray the characters thoughts and emotions?

4. i) What do you think of the music in this scene?
....ii) A little bonus question. Do you prefer the OST version of the soundtrack (Twilight and Shadow) or the Complete Recordings version (The Grace of Undómiel)

5. Any other thoughts or comments about this scene?

What's this? A Ranger caught off his guard?


Ardamírë
Valinor


Aug 21 2013, 9:04pm

Post #2 of 5 (519 views)
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Costumes [In reply to] Can't Post

I have absolutely always loved this dress of Arwen's. It's gorgeous. It might be my favorite costume in the films. And the more I learn of it, the more I love it.

It's her "dying" dress, and it's a wonderful contrast to her coronation dress, with the green signifying springtime and rebirth. According to Elrond later on, Arwen is dying and will die unless Sauron is defeated. Once he is, she comes back to life.

Also, it's worth noting one of the more fascinating aspects of this dress: the red sleeves. SirDennis speculates that this image suggests suicide. Note the red sleeves resembling pools of blood. What a wonderful insight, since Arwen quite literally gives up her life for Aragorn in order to becomes mortal.

THE SONG OF TUOR
Only the reeds were rustling, but a mist lay on the streams
Like a sea-roke drawn far inland, like a shred of salt sea-dreams.
'Twas in the Land of Willows that I heard th'unfathomed breath
Of the Horns of Ylmir calling - and shall hear them till my death.


Werde Spinner
Rohan


Aug 22 2013, 1:07am

Post #3 of 5 (515 views)
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More Elves, so pretty... [In reply to] Can't Post

1. I have never thought about this before. I obviously do not know much about the incredible detail in choosing shots, angles, etc. that goes into film-making. However, now that it has been pointed out to me, I must give a resounding *yes*! It is excellent symbolism and I love it so much. (I also like looking at the Elves' pretty buildings and furniture, so, yeah, the more I see of that as well, the happier I am.)

2. The golds, whites, and browns of the top picture represent the Elves' decline, especially with Elrond in the picture, who will (comparatively) soon be leaving Middle-earth. The blacks and silvers of the bottom picture remind me of moonlight and starlight against the night sky. The starlight connotation especially reminds me of Elves, and makes me think that this is nighttime for Elves in Middle-earth. Their time is over; their day is done. With their reforging of Anduril, they are symbolically handing over command of Middle-earth to Men and stepping back.
Minor note: Both color compositions allow for the red/oranges to really stand out - Arwen's dress in the top one and the fire in the bottom one.

3. Whatever Elrond's wearing, it suddenly strikes me as almost funereal. (Do we know how Elves conducted their funerals??)
As for Arwen's dress, it reminds me of something seen in Byzantine icons of the Blessed Mother. If I recall correctly, red therein is meant to represent divinity and blue represents mortality. Jesus, for example, is shown wearing both. Applying this to Middle-earth, the red sleeves represent Arwen's vital Elven nature, and the dark blue/black portion of the dress represents the mortality she chooses for the sake of Aragorn. If you'll notice, there is now more blue/black than red, showing that her Elven life is fading away.

4. (i) The music whenever Arwen is on the screen is always hauntingly beautiful.
(ii) Um... I don't know the different. Shame on me! Frown I must now go rectify my ignorance and listen to these different pieces!

5. You want my random comments? You get my random comments.
(1) Have the Elves ever heard of the concept of actual windows, or do they live their entire lives on porches? I mean, what do they do when it rains or storms? When it snows? Maybe they can take that sort of thing better than Men...
(2) I like the flower arrangement in the vase behind Arwen. Did she do that herself?
(3) I could swear that I've read somewhere that the set dressers sprinkled the leaves with spices (nutmeg, paprika) in order to give them their autumnal colors, since they didn't actually film the Rivendell scenes in the fall. Can anyone else confirm this?

"I had forgotten that. It is hard to be sure of anything among so many marvels. The world is all grown strange. Elf and Dwarf in company walk in our daily fields; and folk speak with the Lady of the Wood and yet live; and the Sword comes back to war that was broken in the long ages ere the fathers of our fathers rode into the Mark! How shall a man judge what to do in such times?"

"As he ever has judged. Good and ill have not changed since yesteryear; nor are they one thing among Elves and Dwarves and another among Men. It is a man's part to discern them, as much in the Golden Wood as in his own house."


FaramirAndEowynMorningStar
Rohan


Aug 22 2013, 7:27pm

Post #4 of 5 (512 views)
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Love that scene! [In reply to] Can't Post

What struck me throughout the entire trilogy (and I am even detecting it now in the Hobbit) is that in almost all the scenes that involve the elves there are moments where the camera is zoomed out and it is as though the audience is peering in like children at the elves (a little like Frodo and Sam when they see the woodelves). In other scenes with men of dwarves the audience is usually made to feel much more part of the scene. I assume this is deliberate rather than coincidence, possibly to emphasise the fact that the elves are ethereal compared to any other creature in Middle Earth.
1. Do you think this is why they have done this? Do you like the way they have done this?

I had not really thought about it until I saw The Hobbit (the 'Moon Runes' scene especially). I think it may be possible that they have made this deliberate. Elves are the most powerful and wisest creatures in Middle-Earth...
You can tell what emotions are racing through other minds (like Men, Dwarves and Hobbits) but the Elves never seem to betray their emotions [they keep emotions hidden behind a sort of mask, as it were].

2. Look at the colours in each scene. Symbolically what do think is being conveyed here?
Well... the hot colours in the first scene may symbolise her determination as well as (as you said previously) the idea that they are autumnal colours - that they symbolise Arwen's choice.
The second shows cool colours, symbolising perhaps the loyalty of Elrond - as he is doing his daughter's bidding... and then the fire could symbolise the creativity (renewal) of the Sword... and, of course, the light shining down upon the blacksmiths symbolises hope - a light from Rivendell (as if Elrond has given his blessing).

3. A question for costume lovers. What do you think of the costumes in this scene and how they help portray the characters thoughts and emotions?
Arwen's red dress symbolises danger (because she's giving up her immortality), determination (because it's for Aragorn) and love (for her father, and Aragorn).

4. i) What do you think of the music in this scene?
Obviously, the music describes what's happening - a sorrowful solo voice for Arwen changing into the hopeful Gondor theme (all very symbolic, I must say).
....ii) A little bonus question. Do you prefer the OST version of the soundtrack (Twilight and Shadow) or the Complete Recordings version (The Grace of Undómiel)
Ur... I honestly don't know... um....
On the whole, I prefer The Grace of Undómiel.

5. Any other thoughts or comments about this scene?
I think that is so romantic and so brave that Arwen was giving up her immortality, reforging the sword... doing all of that for Aragorn. Heart

....."Loyalty, Honor,
......A Willing Heart.
I can ask no more than that."

.... ~ Thorin Oakenshield


Darkstone
Immortal


Aug 26 2013, 7:20pm

Post #5 of 5 (467 views)
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"Or were you looking at the woman in the red dress?" [In reply to] Can't Post

1. Do you think this is why they have done this?

Yes, it does give distance and thus an air of mystery to the Elves.


Do you like the way they have done this?

My personal impression of Elves has always been more of manic-depressives off their meds than Vulcans on Xanex, but this works.


2. Look at the colours in each scene. Symbolically what do think is being conveyed here?

Afternoon of the Elves, and Night. of the Elves.


3. A question for costume lovers. What do you think of the costumes in this scene and how they help portray the characters thoughts and emotions?

I suppose this isn’t referring to the Chinese tradition of brides being married in red.

Elrond’s garb is monkish brown, showing a dissociation from the real world. (Shades of Radagast!) It’s only by the red of Arwen’s passion that he realizes the depth of her commitment, a commitment which he now must honor and support.

Of course red is also the courage of courage and sacrifice, which is reflected in Arwen’s choice.


4. i) What do you think of the music in this scene?

Purty.


ii) A little bonus question. Do you prefer the OST version of the soundtrack (Twilight and Shadow) or the Complete Recordings version (The Grace of Undómiel)

It’s all good.


5. Any other thoughts or comments about this scene?

The area of the forging is reminiscent of Svartálfaheimr (the realm of the Dark Elves) where the Gleipnir, a fetter as fine as a silken ribbon, was forged. (Similar to hithlain aka “mist thread”.) The fetter was used to chain Fenrisúlfur, or the Fenris Wolf. The wolf bit off the god Tyr’s hand, similar to how the wolf Carcharoth bit off Beren’s hand. Beren’s love was Luthien, and Luthien’s beauty is relfected in Arwen, which leads us to Aragorn for whom Andúril, Flame of the West is being forged. Coincidence? I think not!

******************************************
Once Gandalf dreamt he was a moth, a moth flitting and fluttering around, happy with himself and doing as he pleased. He didn't know he was Gandalf. Suddenly he woke up and there he was, solid and unmistakably Gandalf. But he didn't know if he was Gandalf who had dreamt he was a moth, or a moth dreaming he was Gandalf. Between Gandalf and a moth there must be some distinction! But really, there isn't, because he's actually Olórin dreaming he's both Gandalf *and* a moth!
-From Gandalfi: The Moth Dream


(This post was edited by Darkstone on Aug 26 2013, 7:22pm)

 
 

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