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It's the Mardi Gras/Valentine's Day reading thread!
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Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 13 2013, 2:58pm

Post #26 of 43 (117 views)
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It's probably a good thing.... [In reply to] Can't Post

...they don't write them like that any more! And yet, Tolstoy had to write all that verbiage out with pen and ink and nowadays we all use word processors and yet books are growing short and punchier. Go figure Crazy




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 13 2013, 2:59pm

Post #27 of 43 (108 views)
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What an intriguing premise! [In reply to] Can't Post

Your description reminds me a bit of the classic British animated Christmas program, The Snowman, which I love even though, well, the sending is sad.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 13 2013, 3:00pm

Post #28 of 43 (108 views)
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There's a sign of a good story! [In reply to] Can't Post

You're emotionally engaged. Well done Mr. Martin! Wink




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 13 2013, 3:02pm

Post #29 of 43 (110 views)
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There's a recommendation [In reply to] Can't Post

Not that sometimes you're going to like something someone else doesn't---that's just a fact of life---but that the series brought you together with your spouse. Cool! (I know a few couples brought together by Tolkien, not to name names....Cool )




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 13 2013, 3:04pm

Post #30 of 43 (113 views)
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Oh my... [In reply to] Can't Post

...if he writes about books the way Bryson writes about travel then I'll definitely need to look him up. My cup of tea!




Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 13 2013, 3:33pm

Post #31 of 43 (109 views)
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There's a sad little vignette [In reply to] Can't Post

in Anna Karenina about a writer who spent six years writing a book, and then inadvertently ticked off a reviewer in an interview, got a bad review, and his book crashed. No second chances in those days.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



acheron
Gondor


Feb 13 2013, 11:23pm

Post #32 of 43 (106 views)
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the quick version of the story [In reply to] Can't Post

She broke up with me very shortly after we got together, but I had been borrowing the books from her and reading them. So we had to meet up so I could give her the book back, and then she let me borrow the next one anyway, and then we had to meet again for that one, and eventually she decided it had been a mistake to break up. Cool

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


acheron
Gondor


Feb 14 2013, 12:50am

Post #33 of 43 (109 views)
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Oh ok [In reply to] Can't Post

Well glad you liked most of it then. How long have you been reading the series? I started when Winter's Heart was the latest one out, so it's been over a decade, though that's not nearly as long as some have been reading them!

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


zarabia
Tol Eressea


Feb 14 2013, 7:12am

Post #34 of 43 (91 views)
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Oh, heck! [In reply to] Can't Post

I was happy to read Ciars' review because I felt justified in giving up on the series, but now (after reading your review and looking ahead to Ciars' response that she liked most of it) I might just have to review and catch up on the series so I can finally fund out how it ends. I adored Eye Of The World, it's one of my all time favorites, but, though I really enjoyed the next few, I became a bit more frustrated with each installment. I finally gave up around Path of Daggers. (I had forgotten that I stuck it out that long until I looked at the wikipedia summaries.) I always felt that all the elements were there for a superlative series, but things got lost in all the padding and repetition. But I became very attached to the core group of characters and storylines, and I would like to finally see it through to the end. Whew! That's a lot of reading though Crazy

"The question isn't where, Constable, but when." - Inspector Spacetime

(This post was edited by zarabia on Feb 14 2013, 7:15am)


Ciars
Rohan


Feb 14 2013, 7:54am

Post #35 of 43 (95 views)
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Double that! [In reply to] Can't Post

And then add some more! I started just after the first book came out, it must have been around the early 90's as I have a first edition ( paper back though not hardback!) back then I subscribed to the sci-fi book club, so it was I think one of their recommended reads! It must have been over twenty years ago! I can remember waiting impatiently for different books to get published at first, that ebbed as the series seemed to (excuse the joke) roll on and on. A bit like the game of thrones series, in that as the gap grew between books the anticipation dipped rather than grew, especially with some books which due to the sheer size of the story arc were more like fillers rather than plot progressing. Unlike game of thrones of course there was not a tv series to keep the appetite growing or refresh the plot. It became a chore almost, as in order to appreciate new books especially later on in the series I felt I had to recap on the earlier books! Quite a task by the final book! Having said that, because I wanted to know what the end would be I knew I would regret not finishing the series.


(This post was edited by Ciars on Feb 14 2013, 8:01am)


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 14 2013, 2:58pm

Post #36 of 43 (80 views)
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That's great! [In reply to] Can't Post

My husband and I went out for a month or so, broke up, then, almost a year later, I passed him on the highway and followed him to a traffic light, where I honked and waved. Now, two children and four grandchildren later, I still get nostalgic at the sight of a green Mustang Evil Heart




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 14 2013, 3:00pm

Post #37 of 43 (80 views)
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Not many second chances these days, either [In reply to] Can't Post

If for completely different reasons. Unimpressed




Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 14 2013, 3:08pm

Post #38 of 43 (74 views)
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These days, at least a person can be heard. [In reply to] Can't Post

Start a blog, write on forums, put up a website, self-publish a book. It's a less stifling world here in the 21st century.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 14 2013, 3:40pm

Post #39 of 43 (76 views)
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Yes indeed [In reply to] Can't Post

It's also a much noisier world, with so many people shouting for attention! Shocked




AlassŽa Eruvande
Valinor


Feb 14 2013, 4:18pm

Post #40 of 43 (94 views)
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"More baths less talking" is my goal for my kids. [In reply to] Can't Post

The Little Goblin is a chatterbox and both of my boys don't particularly like baths anymore. Tongue



I am SMAUG! I kill when I wish! I am strong, strong, STRONG!
My armor is like tenfold shields! My teeth like swords! My claws, spears!
The shock of my tail, a thunderbolt! My wings, a hurricane! And my breath, death!


zarabia
Tol Eressea


Feb 15 2013, 6:34am

Post #41 of 43 (64 views)
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LOL! Too cute! :D // [In reply to] Can't Post

 

"The question isn't where, Constable, but when." - Inspector Spacetime


kiwifan
Rohan

Feb 18 2013, 2:18pm

Post #42 of 43 (59 views)
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That's what I feared [In reply to] Can't Post

when I read a couple of weeks ago that you had picked up 'Cousin Kate' as your first Georgette Heyer novel (the non-mystery kind) --- of all her novels 'Cousin Kate' is the one I like least because it makes me cry, and is much darker in tone than her other ones, but I didn't comment on it since I didn't want to influence you. It's one of Heyer's later ones, and these seem to tend to be a bit slower-paced and more verbose.

Her use of period slang I actually consider one of the charms of her books, it makes them more authentic for me. Even when I first began reading them in English, at seventeen, when my English still wasn't all that good, I never had a problem with it. (But then I watch films in Mongolian, Arabic and other languages I don't know at all, with German or English subtitles, because that way they feel more authentic.) So I was quite surprised that you consider it a 'relentless slog' to read. Perhaps these novels aren't suitable for fast reading but need to be savoured at leisure.

Heyer did an incredible amount of research concerning the Georgian and Regency periods (and even more for those that are set in other eras), as can be seen from the list of sources at the end of 'An Infamous Army', studying not only letters but diaries, journals and biographies of individuals, and so she knows not only the slang of the times, of different social strata from the aristocracy down to thieves and highwaymen, but also the fashions in dress and interior design, food, what people did with their time, and even occasionally alluding to social problems of the times, political figures and events. So in a way the worlds her books are set in are as multifacetted as Tolkien's. That's another reason why I enjoy them so much; to me they're not just love stories that happened to be set in these particular eras but a genuine and rich picture of those times.

Like Annael said, 'The Grand Sophy' is probably the most 'modern' of her heroines (but certainly not a typical female of her time!) in that she very much shapes her own destiny (and that of others) --- but then Sophy has money and thus a great deal of independence, which makes a big difference and gives one much more scope (even today, and don't I know it!). So I hope you will give Heyer another try!


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 18 2013, 3:07pm

Post #43 of 43 (119 views)
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Well.... [In reply to] Can't Post

When I saw the publication date of Cousin Kate I suspected it might not be Heyer at her best. Thank you for confirming that the others are faster-paced and less verbose. I personally didn't think it was all that dark, but the very casual approach to the dire events of the ending left me nonplussed, to say the least.

I confess that "relentless slog" is much too harsh. I normally enjoy dialect and other languages and I do like period detail. But Heyer's period slang just got to be too much. It began to sound affected, sort of "hey, look at me, I did my research!" It's quite possible that with a more engaging story I wouldn't get quite so annoyed with the language.

I will certainly give Heyer another try, and will try myself to be a little less critical. (I'm an author myself, and being critical of others' work is an unfortunate occupational hazard Unsure )

Thank you for your thoughtful reply!



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