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It's the New Year's Resolution Reading Thread!
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Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2013, 6:07pm

Post #26 of 38 (76 views)
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Hemingway at times sets my teeth on edge [In reply to] Can't Post

It's like he's trying way too hard to be blunt and direct, if you see what I mean. Stunt-writing. Thud, thud, thud, look at me, I'm a man's man. And then you find passages that are pure gold, go figure.

It's hard to believe, stylistically, that he and Tolkien are roughly contemporary. Tolkien continued on with the literary conventions of his elders while Hemingway deconstructed and rejected them, as you say.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2013, 6:09pm

Post #27 of 38 (86 views)
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I'm sure there are many stories to be told of the war brides [In reply to] Can't Post

An Australian friend of mine's aunt came back to the US with an American soldier after the war---that would also have been quite a culture shock.

I wonder how many men stayed in their wives' countries?




Radhruin
Rohan


Jan 10 2013, 2:58am

Post #28 of 38 (77 views)
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Ah, adolescence [In reply to] Can't Post

That would describe how I viewed the characters in 'A Moveable Feast', 15 year olds. Weren't they in their mid to late 20s in Paris? Ha. I wonder whether I would have a different view of Hemingway had I read him in college, and not fifteen years later. Thanks for your thoughts, I enjoyed reading them.



Radhruin
Rohan


Jan 10 2013, 3:17am

Post #29 of 38 (77 views)
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The Heart is a Lonely Hunter [In reply to] Can't Post

by Carson McCullers. I enjoy the "feel" of this, reminds me of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'. Singer is a great character, but I sense that this may be darker reading than I expected, although I have a third of the book left. Nothing like having a title recommended by a good friend who *really* knows what you like.



Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 10 2013, 2:58pm

Post #30 of 38 (94 views)
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Yes indeed [In reply to] Can't Post

Nothing like the recommendation of a good friend! I hope you enjoy the book.




Annael
Half-elven


Jan 10 2013, 5:50pm

Post #31 of 38 (65 views)
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the author of this book [In reply to] Can't Post

saw "A Moveable Feast" (which was written later) as a "poison pen letter" in which Hemingway tried to put all the blame for his own failures and limitations onto others, including the Murphys. He blamed them, for instance, for the failure of his first marriage, which makes no sense.

There's some discussion in the book about how Hemingway's father (who shot himself too) never once gave his son one word of approval or support. The Murphys gave him both, so it seems to me that as can happen, he projected all his unresolved feelings about his father onto Gerald, who was at least 15 years older than him. I believe Hemingway was only about 20 when they met. The author of the biography thinks he was in love with Sara and jealous of Gerald for that reason as well.

The man who always insisted that one should "write only things that are true" was not, alas, much for self-reflection, a necessary part of true maturity. Instead he stayed what Hillman calls "an eternal boy" and never grew past adolescence emotionally.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967

(This post was edited by Annael on Jan 10 2013, 5:52pm)


sherlock
Gondor


Jan 12 2013, 1:38pm

Post #32 of 38 (50 views)
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I read this when [In reply to] Can't Post

I was a teenager. Don't remember much about it except that I liked it. I read To Kill a Mockingbird around the same time but read it again when my daughter had to read it for school. Maturity improved my appreciation of the book, especially the humor.


kiwifan
Rohan

Jan 13 2013, 8:38pm

Post #33 of 38 (41 views)
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Haven't read The House on the Strand yet (it's in one of my to-read piles... [In reply to] Can't Post

but I dearly love 'Frenchman's Creek' , re-reading it every couple of years or so, and giving it to friends as presents (I never lend anyone books anymore because most people maltreat my darlings and I can't bear to see it). Its ending is so bitter-sweet...


Patty
Immortal


Jan 13 2013, 8:43pm

Post #34 of 38 (41 views)
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Have you seen the dramatization of Frenchman's Creek starring Tara Fitzgerald? / [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Permanent address: Into the West






kiwifan
Rohan

Jan 13 2013, 8:51pm

Post #35 of 38 (53 views)
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Yes, the problem with unlikeable characters is well known to me [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been having to force myself to struggle through a trilogy of historical novels set in New Zealand, written by a German woman with the English-sounding pseudonym Sarah Lark. As far as I can judge, they're well-researched (historical events, society, morals, political events, etc.), the author has clearly been to NZ because her descriptions tally with what I actually saw there myself twenty years ago (landscapes, flora, climate), but I so dislike practically all of her characters or at least have no sympathy for them at all that it really is a struggle reading these tomes (I think about 800-900 pages or so, each, can't remember). I'm stuck in the middle of the third volume (begun after having been to an amazingly good exhibition called 'Maori' here in Stuttgart last October, and given up again after a couple of days) but am honour-bound to finish it --- one of these days --- since I keep extending the deadline and really ought to see it through. Crazy


Starling
Half-elven


Jan 13 2013, 9:09pm

Post #36 of 38 (52 views)
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I wouldn't bother [In reply to] Can't Post

Surely life is too short to force yourself to finish a book full of horrid characters that you have no sympathy for?
But perhaps I don't have your staying power. Wink

There are some good historical novels about life in New Zealand, written by New Zealanders. you could always try some of those, if you have an interest in that area. I'm glad you enjoyed the 'Maori' exhibition. Smile


kiwifan
Rohan

Jan 13 2013, 11:28pm

Post #37 of 38 (40 views)
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No I haven't seen it [In reply to] Can't Post

just checked the city library's catalogue online and they don't have it --- which is almost a relief because usually I avoid watching film versions of my favourite novels. I find it works the other way round, for instance 'North and South' starring Richard Armitage was fine, and I only read the novel after watching this BBC dramatization of it so the discrepancies didn't bother me too much. But with a novel like 'Frenchman's Creek' which I must have read a dozen times already, I'd be afraid of disillusionment, or disappointment, to put it less strongly. That's why I still refuse to watch the Harry Potter films, and was glad to see one and a half LotR films before ever opening the book so it never bothered me that Elijah Wood is much too young and beautiful for Frodo, or that Faramir and Boromir look rather different from Tolkien's descriptions of them... and why I'm now having a much harder time with the 'Hobbit AUJ' because I know the book so well.


kiwifan
Rohan

Jan 13 2013, 11:31pm

Post #38 of 38 (48 views)
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That sounds most interesting, who is the author?\\ [In reply to] Can't Post


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