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Weekly reading thread

Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 13 2012, 5:02pm

Post #1 of 23 (274 views)
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Weekly reading thread Can't Post

I subbing for Lily Fairbairn this week. Please tell us what you're reading!

I'm about halfway through "The Stand" by Stephen King and finding it a page-turner, but I have to be careful not to read too much at one go because it gets me down. So I've been balancing it with "Emma" by Jane Austen :-)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Nov 13 2012, 5:44pm

Post #2 of 23 (97 views)
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Continuing with The Awakended: Book 1 [In reply to] Can't Post

Not much time to read this week, or next, but for now I'm still reading The Awakended: Book 1 by Jason Tesar. It's a free book (available from Amazon) and so far, so good. I haven't looked up the other books in the series (assuming there ARE a book 2 & 3, but I'm definitely interested, even if they aren't free.

Notta

Happiness: money matters, but less than we think and not in the way that we think. Family is important and so are friends, while envy is toxic -- and so is excessive thinking. Beaches are optional. Trust is not. Neither is gratitude. - The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner as summarized by Lily Fairbairn. And a bit of the Hobbit reading thrown in never hurts. - NottaSackville


wendy woo
Rivendell


Nov 14 2012, 12:28am

Post #3 of 23 (98 views)
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Interesting combination, Aunty! [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been flipping through my copy of Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer. After all the fiction this fall, I thought a little non-fic would be a good thing.
This book's an informative read. It lays out the pattern that the first British waves of immigration followed after the success of the Plymouth colony, and compares the cultural differences between the four groups (the British aristocracy, the Puritans from East Anglia, the Northern English Quakers, and the Scots-Irish) that eventually settled the colonies. Fascinating read.

"We named the monkey Jack."


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 14 2012, 12:31am

Post #4 of 23 (95 views)
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It's on purpose. [In reply to] Can't Post

I need Austen to neutralize King before I can sleep at night. :-D

Albion's Seed sounds fascinating! Some of my ancestors and some of my husband's ancestors came over in the 1640s, but one set of his grandparents came over about a hundred years ago.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



wendy woo
Rivendell


Nov 14 2012, 12:48am

Post #5 of 23 (92 views)
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One of these days, I keep promising myself, I will do a little digging and trace my roots! [In reply to] Can't Post

My younger sister was able to do enough research to satisfy the DAR when she joined the group a few years ago. She determined that MOST of our antecedents, on both sides of the family no less, hailed from the British Isles, but I've never viewed her results. I'd like to see how far back I can go myself.
What I enjoy thinking about is how little bits of culture seem to hang on to a family. Certain expressions, for instance, or a set of habits that don't seem typical for the time and place. My mother used an expression recently that I've always considered a British expression--"So and so was called on the carpet". I was actually kind of surprised and asked her about it. She said "That's a common enough expression, really". Well I've never heard any other American use it before.
My great-grandparents used to crack me up, too. No matter the weather, they always drank cups of hot tea both morning and evening every day. In fact, they routinely ate supper at a typical "tea time" hour. They ate cold cereal, toast and hot tea for supper every night without fail.

"We named the monkey Jack."


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 14 2012, 12:52am

Post #6 of 23 (87 views)
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I was lucky in that others did it for me. [In reply to] Can't Post

My dad and my uncle did a lot of work on my side of the family, and my husband's grandfather did his side. I'm in the DAR, and so is my husband's sister. I can't make it to many of their meetings, though.

My father doesn't approve of the DAR, because of their history of racial discrimination. I think the organization has tried to fix that, but he is disgusted with them.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



(This post was edited by Aunt Dora Baggins on Nov 14 2012, 12:53am)


guitarzankansasfan
Lorien


Nov 14 2012, 3:42am

Post #7 of 23 (85 views)
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Some surprising things get passed down. [In reply to] Can't Post

It's interesting to hear what things get preserved over the generations.

Most of my ancestors came from England to Utah in the 1850s, but I have a few lines that go back to colonial times. One of them is my paternal grandmother's maternal line, which goes back several generations to Virginia. I've heard that both speech and cooking is passed down from mother to daughter. In my grandma's case, she would use southern phrases such as "right soon" and she would overcook the heck out of her beef roasts in southern fashion, also serving lots of cornbread and steamed greens. I didn't realize some of these things until I moved to the South and noticed the similarities.

My grandpa, on the other hand, still preserved a slight Sussex accent when he talked about his early life, despite being a 2nd generation American.

One German ancestry line on my father's side was responsible for the family tradition of calling the kid by his/her middle name instead of the first name, a tradition finally broken when they called my Dad by his first name instead.

And my wife, whose mother grew up in New Jersey, calls a carbonated beverage a "soda" while I call it "pop".

There was a man.
There was a lady.
There was a Dragon Lord.


guitarzankansasfan
Lorien


Nov 14 2012, 3:47am

Post #8 of 23 (81 views)
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I've been reading Beyonders [In reply to] Can't Post

The new series by Brandon Mull, the guy who wrote Fablehaven. You've got to give the guy credit for creativity when entering a portal to a parallel world involves being swallowed by a hippopotamus.

There was a man.
There was a lady.
There was a Dragon Lord.


(This post was edited by guitarzankansasfan on Nov 14 2012, 3:48am)


kiwifan
Rohan

Nov 14 2012, 1:06pm

Post #9 of 23 (70 views)
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Hanging out too much in our new library [In reply to] Can't Post

instead of reading any of the hundreds of unread books which, in bags and piles, are cluttering up my flat. Oh, this is our new library, one year old:

http://www.betonprisma.de/ausgaben/natur/essays0092/betonprisma/die_neue_stadtbibliothek_in_stuttgart.html?tx_ttnews[backPid]=3125&cHash=e8c4dd7e15

Of course, the text is in German but you get an impression from the pictures. The big empty space, cube-shaped in the centre of the cube-shaped building, is called the 'heart', with a small square bit of water called the 'fountain of knowledge' in the centre, and light coming in from the glass building blocks constituting the roof of the 'heart' and at the same time the floor of the inverted pyramid above. This 'heart' is four storeys high, and above it, like an inverted pyramid, is an open space (five storeys high) with galleries surrounding it, and light coming in from the glass-roof on top. It's a very controversial building, a lot of people calling it the 'book prison' and similar derogatory names, as it has a rather forbidding aspect, but I've got used to it, even to the 'heart' which first struck me as a horrible waste of space. And it has received positive attention internationally, being voted the sixth 'coolest' library in the world, and so on. It offers a lot more than books, dvds, cds and such.

So I hang out there a lot, succumbing to the lure of books/dvds on display on the shelves, instead of reducing the piles of books bought in secondhand shops and flea markets and so on (I'm totally addicted to buying books, and go on a spree whenever I'm seriously upset or in more pain than usual). Will list what I've been reading in a separate post as I can't sit for long at a stretch, my back being terribly messed up again..Frown

'Goodness gracious, you really are a messie!' 'Oh no, I'm not, these are all just mathoms...'


Padfoot
Bree


Nov 14 2012, 1:12pm

Post #10 of 23 (67 views)
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Taking a break [In reply to] Can't Post

... from reading "Clarissa", and read "Stone and Shadows" by Elizabeth Edmondson and currently I'm reading "Frozen Heat" by Richard CastleWink After that, I'll continue with Clarissa, since I want to have finished it by Christmas....

I'm finding it much easier to read the physical books (Heat, Stone & Shadows) than to read the e-book (Clarissa). The physical books are easier on my eyes....


signature by kiteflier with kind permission of http://richardarmitagenet.com

(This post was edited by Padfoot on Nov 14 2012, 1:14pm)


sherlock
Gondor


Nov 14 2012, 3:55pm

Post #11 of 23 (87 views)
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I read [In reply to] Can't Post

A good bit of Stephen King (including The Stand) as a teenager & young adult but now I find it hard to read his gory & scary stuff. I think he's a great story teller & I've enjoyed books like Shawshank Redemption & The Green Mile. Maybe I should read The Stand again because I don't remember much about it other than it was a page turner.


Loresilme
Valinor


Nov 14 2012, 5:23pm

Post #12 of 23 (76 views)
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"An Ocean of Air" [In reply to] Can't Post

by Gabrielle Walker. A very well-written, interesting and enjoyable book about the earth's atmosphere and the scientists who investigated and uncovered its workings.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 14 2012, 6:34pm

Post #13 of 23 (63 views)
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I don't like gory or scary either [In reply to] Can't Post

which is why it took me so long to read King (I read Carrie when it first came out, but I was a moody kid then.) I wish he wrote a different kind of book. That's why I loved 11.22.63; it was almost like a Fannie Flagg book, a chick-flick of a book in some ways. Except for the horrible gory bits near the beginning. Sigh.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 14 2012, 6:54pm

Post #14 of 23 (89 views)
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My family never used seasonings in cooking. [In reply to] Can't Post

Maybe a little salt, but that was all. I always thought that might be because of English roots.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Annael
Half-elven


Nov 14 2012, 10:24pm

Post #15 of 23 (58 views)
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sounds like how my paternal grandmother cooked [In reply to] Can't Post

she was Scottish. She mostly boiled food until it was tasteless.

My mother, on the other hand, came from a very wealthy family (they lost it all in the Depression). They had a cook. My mom learned to cook after she got married and Julia Child was a huge influence on her, so we grew up eating basically French cooking. We always had a salad and fresh vegetables, and she taught me how to make good sauces. Made it hard when we went to Grandma's house and had to choke down her horrible food. My sister and I, my niece, and my gay nephew have all been inspired by Mom's cooking, and all of us, including Mom, have branched out to cuisines from other countries. Ever since my niece was in the Peace Corps in Morocco, for example, Moroccan tagine (a spicy stew) has become one of my staples.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 14 2012, 10:30pm

Post #16 of 23 (58 views)
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I loved my mom's bland cooking [In reply to] Can't Post

but after I got married I also learned to love my husband's spicy cooking. He came from English stock too, mostly, but had one French great-grandfather. So I have no idea whether my theory is correct.

The one thing I couldn't stand when I was kid, though, was the way my mom cooked fish, which was to boil it in milk. It was sooo slimy. Ugh.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Sunflower
Valinor

Nov 15 2012, 3:13am

Post #17 of 23 (95 views)
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Well, to keep me from being spoiled... [In reply to] Can't Post

(seeing as it's getting VERY hard to remain as unspoiled as regards TH as I am--neither soundtrack nor TV spots), and in great anticipation of Les Miserables, I am currently re-reading that. Yep, the whole unabridged enchilada. Tongue

I decided to do this after I found a hardcover edition that Barnes And Noble is selling for $7.98 which is the text of the classic Charles E. Wilbour translation from 1862. It's amazing--I've been hunting one of these for months, but it's all been abridged editions and more modern translations. I have the old Signet paperback with the grey cover from the early 90's, which was "based on" the origional translation, but always wanted to read it in as close as I could get to the origional French. (Of course someone would tell me "It's always best to read a classic in its origional language" and I'm sure that's just as true of Hugo's works as it is to read, Say, LOTR in the origional English....but learning French is above and beyond the call of duty for me in this case:).
I know it's the origional English translation b/c I was able to find the exact spot in Valjeans's death speech that always had the effect of turning on a water faucet in my tear ductsSly and discovering that at that point Valjean goes all Old Testamant and segues into "thee's" and "thou's." OMG...I had to shut the book to keep from crying all over again..I'll save that for a month from now....I'd be fascinated to learn if that was intenional, Hugo's language, or if it's the Romance language thing that other languages than English had, at least in that era, people still using the formal "I" and the informal "thou" if French has such a thing, but as Valjean was speaking to Cosette maybe not? Or was Hugo employing the informal "thou" for some other purpose?

What's really fascinating to me is that in English the "thee"and "thou" is not informal but formal these days, but it wasn't always so. I read a book abot Erasmus once and the effect that the first non-Douay translations of the Bible had on 16th-century folk. They used to flock to greet Erasmus in the streets in tears, b/c for them the new Bible translations, with the "thou"s, had such a powerful effect upon them, it made God closer to them, more real...so much more so to them than what they'd been hearing Catholic preachers in church. it was a revolutionary concept to them, this intimacy with the Almighty, as if in reading this they were carrying on a private conversation with Him. it's very hard to fathom now, this effect. B/c for us "thou"is elevated, it is used in reverence, elevating God, making Him more distant, yet more beautiful. I wonder if that was what Hugo was going for there.

It's funny, but after I first fell in love with the musical 20 yrs ago I set out to read the novel (having read a lot of really long books), and I got through the Waterloo section just fine, but when I got to the chapter "Argot" where Hugo embarks on a history of French slang and after that the ABC Society, my eyes glazed over and I ended up skipping the entire barricade section, which (at a glance) bored me to tears. Escept Eponine's death, I wanted to see if she survived. I took up the book again in the Paris sewer. Go figure. All that stuff about poltics, the history of the riot, and the turning tides of history--the part where Hugo is at his most insufferably and unfortunately verbose--seem to be more relevant than ever today, and when I get to those chapters I will read them with much interest.

The movie takes much more from the book than the musical does, so I have read, so it'll be great to revisit it with that in mind.


(This post was edited by Sunflower on Nov 15 2012, 3:22am)


Sunflower
Valinor

Nov 15 2012, 3:48am

Post #18 of 23 (65 views)
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One more thing... [In reply to] Can't Post

I forgot to add: this brings to mind the Appendices, one of my favorite parts, where Tolkien discusses this very issue and in ME the linguistic oddities are reversed--how the "I" is informal and the "thou" is formal--how the servants were astonished at Pippin's using the informal 'I" when speaking with Denethor and how that was part of the birth of the legend in Minas Tirih that he was a halfling Lord. When in the Shire, which of course was based on contemporary England, it as the opposite, and the "thou" was used much as we use it today, only the the rarest most formal occasions (or did in the first half of the 20th century I suppose--today we use it mostly only in prayer.)

This brings to mind the many occasions when Hollywood has screwed this up--linguistic oddities, esp when trying to consciously be "historically faithful." Exhibit front and center: Mel Gibson....there's the way Kevin Constner messed up Lakota when he had Dunbar speaking mens' speech when he was being taught womens'(or was it the other way around? Ignorant of the fact that Lakota has 2 dialects, one for men and the other for women...this is noted in the film, but at the time I read an interview with the Lakota actors and they said Costner had still messed up..) and in Braveheart, one scene always makes me smile--

the first big battle:...we assume of course that the Scottish lords use the informal with each other, but when speaking to a commoner they address him in properly distancing formal speech. So when one of them greets Wallace with the phrase "Where is thy salute?"...newsfash: "thy" is informal! I don't suppose your average modern-day Hollywood scriptwriter bothered to do their research!


(This post was edited by Sunflower on Nov 15 2012, 3:52am)


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 15 2012, 2:02pm

Post #19 of 23 (43 views)
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I'll have to give that another go sometime. [In reply to] Can't Post

I have a free version on my kindle, and got a few chapters in and drifted away. Maybe I didn't have a good translation.

I believe French does have the difference between the formal and informal 'you'. I know Spanish does.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Nov 15 2012, 2:07pm

Post #20 of 23 (37 views)
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I wonder if [In reply to] Can't Post

we modern folk tend to screw up formal and informal because of the King James Bible. Since God is addressed as Thou, we assume it's formal, but it's informal.

I noticed another linguistic screw-up in another Mel Gibson movie, The Passion of the Christ. He has Pilate speaking Latin to Jesus. Now presumably, if Jesus was really divine (which I'm willing to concede in the context of the story) he could speak any language he wanted. But Pilate wouldn't know that. And Pilate wouldn't expect a Jewish craftsman to speak Latin. Greek, maybe, since that was the Common Speech throughout the empire. Or if he was high-and-mighty enough to insist on Latin, he'd have an interpreter handy.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Annael
Half-elven


Nov 15 2012, 3:07pm

Post #21 of 23 (53 views)
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actually [In reply to] Can't Post

addressing someone who is younger or inferior in the familiar 'thou' form IS a way of putting them in their place. What would be wrong is if the inferior person replied in kind.

And yes, French has the intimate "tu" as well as the formal "vous" - one knows that people have become close when they "tutoyer" each other. One addresses a child with "tu" instead of "vous."

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967

(This post was edited by Annael on Nov 15 2012, 3:11pm)


Padfoot
Bree


Nov 16 2012, 9:06am

Post #22 of 23 (59 views)
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Same here [In reply to] Can't Post


Quote
And yes, French has the intimate "tu" as well as the formal "vous" - one knows that people have become close when they "tutoyer" each other. One addresses a child with "tu" instead of "vous."


Yes, the same in German. "Sie" is the formal, and "Du" the intimate. You can be on first name terms, but still use the "Sie". The moment you use the "Du", one knows, you're close.


signature by kiteflier with kind permission of http://richardarmitagenet.com


guitarzankansasfan
Lorien


Nov 17 2012, 8:57pm

Post #23 of 23 (125 views)
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We do a lot of foreign recipes in our house [In reply to] Can't Post

After the time I spent in Peru, I came home with a taste for some Peruvian dishes such as Papa a la Hancaina (boiled potato with yellow pepper cottage cheese sauce garnished with lettuce and Alphonso olives) and simple stuff like lentils over white rice with a fried egg. I also gained a greater tolerance for white rice than some Americans, and my 3 year old daughter loves it.

My wife on the other hand is a huge fan of Indian cuisine, after she went to and Indian restaurant when she was a kid she fell in love with curry, and every once in awhile I get to try some form of experimental curry.

There was a man.
There was a lady.
There was a Dragon Lord.

 
 

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