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It's Tuesday, so that must mean it's time to ask wha'chave been readin'!

NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Aug 17 2010, 3:10pm

Post #1 of 23 (348 views)
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It's Tuesday, so that must mean it's time to ask wha'chave been readin'! Can't Post

I'm still working my way through the Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy. We've had company, so not much time to read.

I need to figure out what I'm going to take on my trip this weekend - not much time to read on the trip, either, but plenty of time on the planes. The HHGG is just too large to cart around.

Notta


Leviathan's Bane
Rivendell


Aug 17 2010, 3:31pm

Post #2 of 23 (178 views)
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"Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"... [In reply to] Can't Post

...as translated by The Professor. And an absolutely beautiful translation it is! I've read other versions of Sir Gawain before, but none of them have alliterations throughout or have the "bob and wheel" as Tolkien's does. Tolkien was truly a master philologist, and this work highlights that fact. I'm just blown away by the alliterative and metrical beauty of his translation.

Pearl next, and then Sir Orfeo! Oh, by the way, does anyone know if "Gawain" is pronounced "Guh-wayne" or "Gow-in?" I've heard it both ways.


"So knights are mythical!" said the younger and less experienced dragons. "We always thought so."

- J.R.R. Tolkien, "Farmer Giles of Ham"

(This post was edited by Leviathan's Bane on Aug 17 2010, 3:31pm)


acheron
Gondor


Aug 17 2010, 3:43pm

Post #3 of 23 (153 views)
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just finished a history of the Glorious Revolution [In reply to] Can't Post

This one. I enjoyed it, and learned a lot. It's not something we covered in any of my history classes here in the US, which is a shame, as I think it was an important moment, not just for those in the British Isles (well, and the Netherlands and other parts of the continent), but also to the future US.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Elberbeth
Tol Eressea


Aug 17 2010, 3:55pm

Post #4 of 23 (134 views)
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The Three Edwards [In reply to] Can't Post

I, II, and III, by Thomas B. Costain. It's part of his Pageant of England, which includes The Conquerors, TTEs, and The Last Plantagenets. I've read them all before, then lost them by lending them out. Came across this one in a yard sale, and am still looking for the others. Very readable, and interesting. I love historical stuff.

"There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark."


NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Aug 17 2010, 4:29pm

Post #5 of 23 (132 views)
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It was also lacking in my US-focused history education // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Aug 17 2010, 4:31pm

Post #6 of 23 (244 views)
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Scissorhands, Cullen and Norton? // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Arwen's daughter
Half-elven


Aug 17 2010, 4:59pm

Post #7 of 23 (134 views)
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Desolation Road [In reply to] Can't Post

This is the story of a little town on Mars that forms accidentally and sees such things as time-travel, saints, and revolution in its short history. The novel follows several members of the town and in many ways tells the story of the town itself rather than the people.

Quirky and fun, I liked Ian McDonald's style and story, but the book failed to grab hold of my interest for very long. I don't know if that says more about the book or about my shortened attention span, though Cool



My LiveJournal
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Alassëa Eruvande
Valinor


Aug 17 2010, 5:02pm

Post #8 of 23 (198 views)
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My college British Lit. professor was Scottish. [In reply to] Can't Post

He pronounced it "gah-WAYNE", where "gah" sounds like the "ahh" you do when the doctor wants to have a look at your throat.

I loved listening to him speak. Very lyrical.



And suddenly the Ainur saw afar off a light, as it were a cloud with a living heart of flame.




Leviathan's Bane
Rivendell


Aug 17 2010, 7:21pm

Post #9 of 23 (146 views)
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A Scottish Brit-Lit prof?! I'm "green" with envy! // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


"So knights are mythical!" said the younger and less experienced dragons. "We always thought so."

- J.R.R. Tolkien, "Farmer Giles of Ham"

(This post was edited by Leviathan's Bane on Aug 17 2010, 7:21pm)


Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Aug 17 2010, 11:17pm

Post #10 of 23 (132 views)
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Exactly the way I pronounce it. [In reply to] Can't Post

You'd be surprised at how logical Scottish pronunciation of English is for us Spanish speakers. That is when they talk slowly and without to much slang, of course. Wink

Although Leviathan's pronunciation "Guh-wayne" could very well have its logic in the French name for this illustrous knight: Gauvain "Guh-van" (nasal n included, bien sűr! Tongue)


Visit Mexico from A to Z! This week Letters R and S.
Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!



Annael
Half-elven


Aug 17 2010, 11:24pm

Post #11 of 23 (108 views)
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Interpreting the Sacred [In reply to] Can't Post

by William Paden. A basic review of the various "lenses" used by Religious Studies folks to look at religion.

For fun, I've been re-reading "The Pursuit of Love" and "Love in a Cold Climate" by Nancy Mitford. Hilarious.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Aug 17 2010, 11:30pm

Post #12 of 23 (115 views)
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Finished Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 [In reply to] Can't Post

Which I found wonderful, as most of what I've read by Bradbury (which isn't that much, and haven't done for long) but I would really recommend the book.

I've also started The King's Gold, the fourth book in the Capitán Alatriste series. It's nice to read an enjoyable, yet extremely well crafted book originally written in Spanish (most of my reading is in English). Pérez-Reverte is a master of the language, holding a seat in the Royal Academy, which is, my friends, no small feat.

Visit Mexico from A to Z! This week Letters R and S.
Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!



silneldor
Half-elven


Aug 18 2010, 3:11am

Post #13 of 23 (113 views)
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Working on here and there, the wide sweeping [In reply to] Can't Post

saga (17books) of the Sacketts by Louis L'Amour.


''Sam put his ragged orc-cloak under his master's head, and covered them both with the grey robe of Lorien; and as he did so his thoughts went out to that fair land, and to the Elves, and he hoped that the cloth woven by their hands might have some virtue to keep them hidden beyond all hope in this wilderness of fear...But their luck held, and for the rest of that day they met no living or moving thing; and when night fell they vanished into the darkess of Mordor.'' - - -rotk, chapter III

May the grace of Manwë let us soar with eagle's wings!

In the air, among the clouds in the sky
Here is where the birds of Manwe fly
Looking at the land, and the water that flows
The true beauty of earth shows
With the stars of Varda lighting my way
In all the realms this is where I stay
In the realm of Manwë Súlimo













Kangi Ska
Half-elven


Aug 18 2010, 4:31am

Post #14 of 23 (122 views)
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Rereading"At the Mountains of Madness" by H.P Lovecraft.// [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Kangi Ska

Make the Hobbit Happen Now!

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Galadhwen
The Shire


Aug 18 2010, 7:33am

Post #15 of 23 (106 views)
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The Lost Symbol - Dan Brown [In reply to] Can't Post

I love it Laugh

~The woods are burning, the ground lies bare. Do you feel it in the earth? Can you smell it in the air? The war is upon you, death moves in the fading light. Are you part of this world? Will you join their fight?~


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Aug 18 2010, 5:36pm

Post #16 of 23 (116 views)
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Raw Spirits, by Iain Banks [In reply to] Can't Post

I picked this book up in Scotland, and it has proved to be everything I hoped -- well-written, quirky, and informative.

Unlike sf writer Banks's other books, this is non-fiction, a chronicle of his journey around Scotland visiting whisky distilleries. There's also quite a bit about his life, the landscape, cars, and a plethora of other details. The delightful style reminded me strongly of Bill Bryson at his best, both funny and insightful, with more than a few lovely plays on words.

I highly recommend it, with one caveat: Banks made his journey in 2003, at the beginning of the Iraq War, and is not at all shy about expressing his opinions of that and of the political figures involved.

* * * * * * *
Do we walk in legends or on the green earth in the daylight?

A man may do both. For not we but those who come after will make the legends of our time. The green earth, say you? That is a mighty matter of legend, though you tread it under the light of day!


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Aug 18 2010, 11:42pm

Post #17 of 23 (106 views)
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"Ethan Frome" and "Going Postal" [In reply to] Can't Post

The former I read on my kindle emulator because hey, it was free, and I'd been wondering for decades if it was as awful as I remembered in 9th grade, when I hated it. As it turns out, it wasn't, though I probably won't be reading it over and over. As a kid I couldn't stand it because I had no patience for characters who were adulterous (that ruined Dr. Zhivago for me too.) I still don't have much patience for it, but I've learned to see things more in shades of gray as I get older. Anyway, the writing was nice, even if the story was pretty grim.

The latter was because my daughter was reading some Pratchett and I thought "Oh, yeah, she's home again and she's brought the Pratchett with her." (She's the Keeper of the Pratchett in our family.) I'm absolutely loving this one. I don't know why, exactly, that some of them appeal to me more than others. There's something endearing about Moist von Lipwig, despite his obvious faults. And that post office is a character in its own right. I'm about halfway through.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Aug 18 2010, 11:46pm

Post #18 of 23 (99 views)
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I finally read that last year. [In reply to] Can't Post

It seems odd that it took me so long, since I've always loved Bradbury. I think my favorites are Dandelion Wine and the Martian Chronicles.

There's a short story he wrote about the mummies in Guanajuato. It's called "Next in Line". I remember that when I read the opening paragraph, I recognized the city from his description before he ever got to the mummies.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Aug 19 2010, 1:47pm

Post #19 of 23 (89 views)
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It's been decades [In reply to] Can't Post

since I read the Guanajato story, but I still remember it. Bradbury is a master!

* * * * * * *
Do we walk in legends or on the green earth in the daylight?

A man may do both. For not we but those who come after will make the legends of our time. The green earth, say you? That is a mighty matter of legend, though you tread it under the light of day!


RosieLass
Valinor


Aug 19 2010, 3:09pm

Post #20 of 23 (120 views)
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Among other things, just finished "The Hobbit" for the humpty-leventh time. [In reply to] Can't Post

There was a discussion on TORn some few months ago about the bit near the end where Bard and Thorin are "discussing" the distribution of Smaug's ill-gotten wealth. I don't remember the exact gist of the discussion, nor whether any consensus was reached.

As I read it again, however, it occurred to me that Thorin was rather hoist on his own dialectic petard. The reason he did not feel obligated to return to Bard any of Girion's stolen property was that Girion was dead and, therefore, not present to claim it. Claiming the right of treasure trove, perhaps, or invoking the law of possession.

He sure changed his tune when it came to the Arkenstone that belonged to his fathers, who, by the way, were also dead and also not present to claim it.

Tongue

It also occurred to me to wonder what business the Elvenking had there at all. I mean, he stayed to succour the Men of Laketown. But why did he set out in the first place, in full battle array, when he heard Smaug was dead? Couldn't he have sent messengers to find out what was going on and then sent the army?

Obviously Tolkien had to get the Elves there in time to fight the Battle of the Five Armies, but still...



It is always those with the fewest sensible things to say who make the loudest noise in saying them. --Precious Ramotswe (Alexander McCall Smith)


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Aug 20 2010, 1:09am

Post #21 of 23 (84 views)
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It's pretty haunting, [In reply to] Can't Post

like a lot of Bradbury's stories.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




weaver
Half-elven

Aug 20 2010, 1:24am

Post #22 of 23 (91 views)
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Have you read "Green Shadows, White Whale"...? [In reply to] Can't Post

Another Bradbury-girl here...Smile

I was delighted when I stumbled across a collection of stories he wrote when in Ireland, while working on the script for Moby Dick (which explains that title!)

Highly recommended!

Weaver




Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Aug 20 2010, 2:39am

Post #23 of 23 (188 views)
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No, that's new to me! [In reply to] Can't Post

I love his Ireland stories too. I'll have to look into that.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



 
 

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