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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Reading Room:
JRRT Author & Illustrator, ch. 5: LOTR: The Book of Mazarbul

Luthien Rising
Lorien


Mar 21 2007, 8:31pm

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JRRT Author & Illustrator, ch. 5: LOTR: The Book of Mazarbul Can't Post

There were many recesses cut in the rock of the walls, and in them were large iron-bound chests of wood. All had been broken and plundered; but beside the shattered lid of one there lay the remains of a book. It had been slashed and stabbed and partly burned, and it was so stained with black and other dark marks like old blood that little of it could be read. Gandalf lifted it carefully, but the leaves crackled and broke as he laid it on the slab. He pored over it for some time without speaking. Frodo and Gimli standing at his side could see, as he gingerly turned the leaves, that they were written by many different hands, in runes, both of Moria and of Dale, and here and there in Elvish script. ...

Gandalf paused and set a few leaves aside. "There are several pages of the same sort, rather hastily written and much damaged, he said; "but I can make little of them in this light. Now there must be a number of leaves missing, because they begin to be numbered five, the fifth year of the colony, I suppose. Let me see! No, they are too cut and stained; I cannot read them. We might do better in the sunlight. Wait! Here is something: a large bold hand using an Elvish script." ...

... “Here is the last page of all." He paused and sighed.

"It is grim reading," he said. "I fear their end was cruel. Listen! We cannot get out. We cannot get out. They have taken the Bridge and second hall. Frár and Lóni and Náli fell there. Then there are four lines smeared so that I can only read went 5 days ago. The last lines run the pool is up to the wall at Westgate. The Watcher in the Water took Óin. We cannot get out. The end comes, and then drums, drums in the deep. I wonder what that means. The last thing written is in a trailing scrawl of elf-letters: they are coming. There is nothing more."



The creation of pages from the Book of Mazarbul clearly captured Tolkien’s imagination. These pages went through many iterations – always complete with holes and other elements of deterioration and destruction. This project of imaginative reconstruction was more than just irresistible: it can be seen as central to Tolkien’s project.

Tolkien “made at least four preliminary sketches of the first of the three pages,” report Hammond and Scull, “and at least one sketch of each of the other two, chiefly in coloured pencil.” The first version of the first page – one I wish were reproduced in their book – was on the final leaf of the original manucript of the Moria chapter. The final version were not drawings, but actual destroyed pages.

The pages were not published, because Tolkien, who wanted all three to appear in the book, would not convert them into halftone (black and white) versions. It was colour or nothing, and the book was published without.


One Page of the Book of Moria (Book of Mazarbul, first page, second version); pencil and coloured pencil (#155, p. 160 in Hammond and Scull).

This version of the first page “is built upon a pencilled grid with numbered lines, the easier to inscribe the text in runes and devise areas of loss. The bottom right corner of the ‘page’ is detached” (H&S p. 163)



online: http://www.warofthering.net/...ien/Untitled-157.jpg


Untitled (Book of Mazarbul), third page, final art; black ink, coloured pencil, and watercolour (#156, p. 161 in Hammond and Scull)



online: http://www.warofthering.net/...ien/Untitled-158.jpg
larger: http://www.aumania.it/fa/tolkien/032.jpg

1. As we’ll want to remember in May, Beowulf was little known until it was transcribed in in the late eighteenth century from the only known manuscript copy – a copy that had been burned in a house fire in 1731. (It was published in the early nineteenth century.) Tolkien’s imagining of a similarly destroyed manuscript must owe something to Beowulf – but why does it appear here?


2. These “facsimile” pages were created alongside the Moria chapter, but were not published with it. Did you first read an edition with them or without them? What effect does their inclusion have on the reading experience? How would you publish them?

3. University honour’s course essay question:

These pages are supposed fascimiles of manuscripts inside a book that is a supposed translation of a supposed copy of a supposed manuscript book. Say something clever about that.


Lúthien Rising
All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. / We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.


wolfranger
Bree


Mar 21 2007, 9:34pm

Post #2 of 20 (137 views)
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Manuscripts and scholars. [In reply to] Can't Post

I am loathe to be one of the first to reply here, as that might give the impression I think I know something. As it is, I hardly ever post here, and am just offering up half-baked theories. (Which, with any luck, will be as good as Ben&Jerry’s Half-Baked ice cream.)

Question 1:
I see Tolkien as a scholar in these drawings, and in the idea of the old and decrepit manuscript. In addition to Beowulf, there must be thousands of examples of similar cases - manuscripts discovered, which are damaged in varying degrees, of completely new works. I’m not sure that begins to answer the question of “why does it appear here?”, but I would be curious to know of different places where manuscripts, damaged or undamaged, appear in the Lord of the Rings. I don’t, of course, have enough knowledge here... One possibility that comes to mind as to why Tolkien would use this idea, and spend so much time on it, with relation to the dwarves: this manuscript reveals beings who are gone, and all that is left is their writing. To me, this is what is fascinating about any manuscript or writing. Especially if damaged, because one has the sense that one is lucky to have anything at all left, but also the sense that something amazing might be just out of reach.

Question 2:
I first read an edition without the facsimile pages, and indeed had only a faint idea that they existed before now. I think if I’d read a copy with them in, it would have served to make me go, “Oh, wow!” (similar to my reaction seeing them just now), and also would’ve added depth to the incredibly real world that Tolkien had already created. As for how I would publish them: as Tolkien asked, of course!

Question 3:
If I were equipped to write I honour’s course essay, I would be in an honour’s course, which I am most definitely not. I would also post far more frequently in the reading room. As it is, I fulfil neither requirement, but am looking forward to other people’s answers to this question.

Cheers,
wolfranger

**********
1. As we’ll want to remember in May, Beowulf was little known until it was transcribed in in the late eighteenth century from the only known manuscript copy – a copy that had been burned in a house fire in 1731. (It was published in the early nineteenth century.) Tolkien’s imagining of a similarly destroyed manuscript must owe something to Beowulf – but why does it appear here?

2. These “facsimile” pages were created alongside the Moria chapter, but were not published with it. Did you first read an edition with them or without them? What effect does their inclusion have on the reading experience? How would you publish them?

3. University honour’s course essay question:

These pages are supposed fascimiles of manuscripts inside a book that is a supposed translation of a supposed copy of a supposed manuscript book. Say something clever about that.
**********

"People at first though it obscurely religious, but when Rodia was rediscovered in Northern California after having disappeard for some years he turned out to be violently anti-religious, though he did not offer any other explanation of the towers' inscriptions and symbols." Howard Becker, Art Worlds. (Referring to the Watts Towers in Los Angeles.)


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 21 2007, 11:02pm

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Link to transcript of pages. [In reply to] Can't Post

From our June 2005 discussion of "The Bridge of Khazad-dûm", quoting from that year's The Lord of the Rings Calendar.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 19-25: Tolkien illustrates The Lord of the Rings


Curious
Half-elven

Mar 21 2007, 11:55pm

Post #4 of 20 (113 views)
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Why does it appear here? Why not? [In reply to] Can't Post

I did not work out the puzzle in The Hobbit, and I doubt that I would have done so in LotR, had these pages been included. But I would have been suitably impressed.

As for your last question, I think all the labor Tolkien put into these pages shows how little he worried about keeping up the pretense that LotR is really a translation of a copy of a manuscript of a memoir. That game is for the Prologue, the last few chapters, and the Appendices. During the vast majority of the story, the objective narrator takes over, and we learn many things Frodo would not have known. These mock manuscript pages would have been just another example of something Frodo could not possibly have preserved for the modern reader.

Finally, these mock manuscript pages also show how everything in LotR was influenced by Tolkien's scholarly interests. Most of Tolkien's heroes -- Bilbo, Frodo, Merry, Gandalf, Aragorn, Faramir -- are scholars, especially of ancient languages and manuscripts. Sam and Pippin are not, but they revere those who are, and learn from them. The Rohirrim are not literate, but they do have a rich oral tradition. Boromir's biggest weakness is his lack of scholarship, or respect for scholars. The biggest bastions of strength against Mordor -- Minas Tirith, Lothlorien, and Rivendell -- are also centers of knowledge. Bombadil and Treebeard are walking libraries of knowledge, and take care to instruct the hobbits.

The orcs corrupt any language they use. They are clever with war machines, but contemptuous of scholarship. Thus they burn and hack this book. Tolkien made no secret of the fact that he had a didactic purpose -- i.e. a teaching purpose -- in writing LotR. Part of that purpose may have been to inspire others with his own love of deciphering ancient manuscripts. And here is an ancient manuscript that the readers may decipher at their leisure.

Ironically, many medievalists and philologists now use LotR to attract students to their profession. Perhaps that was a key part of Tolkien's design, all along!


GaladrielTX
Tol Eressea


Mar 22 2007, 12:03am

Post #5 of 20 (105 views)
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Oh, wow! [In reply to] Can't Post

I never heard of them till this moment. :o)

~~~~~~~~

I used to be GaladrielTX, but my TX went off into the Blue to have mad adventures.



dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Mar 22 2007, 2:13am

Post #6 of 20 (94 views)
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Thank you! [In reply to] Can't Post

I was wondering if you'd pull this up for us! I commend Tolkien for the care he took in coordinating the pages' script with the book text.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Confusticate and bebother these dwarves!"


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Mar 22 2007, 2:16am

Post #7 of 20 (101 views)
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"Perhaps that was [In reply to] Can't Post

a key part of Tolkien's design, all along!"

If not intentionally, then at least subconsciously! What better way to instill interest in a subject, than by introducing them to an entertaining example of its worth!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Confusticate and bebother these dwarves!"


Beren IV
Gondor


Mar 22 2007, 4:39am

Post #8 of 20 (103 views)
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Tolkien is in his own element [In reply to] Can't Post

I agree here: Tolkien is in his own element working on ancient manuscripts of his fictitious world. I'm sure he had to deal with problems like this one.

I have to wonder what all of this is meant to say. For example, I know that it is translated "we found Durin's axe" - I imagine Durin's artifacts as being awesomely powerful items, so there is something in me that says that they weren't awakened or something like that.

I'm not sure to what extent I would publish the facsimile pages, although they do convey the feeling very well. Images of Middle-Earth, however, are somewhat and deliberately vague, so that we imagine our own interpretations. All of Tolkien's images included in the books, like the Moria drawing, are highly abstract - I'm sure that is not what the real holley trees looked like, just the inscribed ones!

Once a paleontologist, now a botanist, will be a paleobotanist


Luthien Rising
Lorien


Mar 22 2007, 8:57pm

Post #9 of 20 (81 views)
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next post tomorrow - sorry for the delay! / [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Lúthien Rising
All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. / We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.


drogo
Lorien


Mar 22 2007, 9:22pm

Post #10 of 20 (96 views)
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My answers, by drogo [In reply to] Can't Post

1. As we’ll want to remember in May, Beowulf was little known until it was transcribed in in the late eighteenth century from the only known manuscript copy – a copy that had been burned in a house fire in 1731. (It was published in the early nineteenth century.) Tolkien’s imagining of a similarly destroyed manuscript must owe something to Beowulf – but why does it appear here?

Tolkien inserted quite a few "homages" to Beowulf and the other literary works that made up his intellectual life, so it is not surprising that we get something like the Beowulf MS in LOTR. It is a bit odd, though, that that illustration is inserted here when there are no others in the book. But to my mind, at least, that suggests that Tolkien, always the philologist, was more concerned with the textual artifacts than with depictions of the Moria Gate, etc.


2. These “facsimile” pages were created alongside the Moria chapter, but were not published with it. Did you first read an edition with them or without them? What effect does their inclusion have on the reading experience? How would you publish them?

I can see how in 1954 it would have been very tricky to insert such illustrations into FORT, especially given the constraints of wartime publishing. I think the way Houghton Mifflin has inserted them in the 50th Anniv. Ed. is probably the best way (individual clay paper plates in the "Journey in the Dark" chapter). HarperCollins (the UK publisher) puts them in a clay paper fold-out in the middle of the text that is a little cumbersome, to me at least.

3. University honour’s course essay question:

These pages are supposed fascimiles of manuscripts inside a book that is a supposed translation of a supposed copy of a supposed manuscript book. Say something clever about that.

I have retired from reading The Name of the Rose!! Tongue


(Formerly drogo of the two names!)


FarFromHome
Valinor


Mar 23 2007, 7:33pm

Post #11 of 20 (89 views)
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Gimli takes the Book of Mazarbul [In reply to] Can't Post

with him, doesn't he?

I've found the passage:

"We will take this book, the Book of Mazarbul, and look at it more closely later. You had better keep it, Gimli, and take it back to Dáin, if you get a chance. It will interest him, though it will grieve him deeply."

So it's not too hard to imagine that at some point in the Red Book's imaginary lifetime, as it passes through the hands of various scholars, a copy of these pages might have become attached to it. I like the idea, anyway.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


Curious
Half-elven

Mar 23 2007, 10:05pm

Post #12 of 20 (83 views)
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I'm sure [In reply to] Can't Post

that's exactly why Tolkien put that in there -- in order to explain the presence of drawings that never got published, at least not until recently. But I stick by my argument that LotR does not really read like a memoir at all, except from time to time when Tolkien remembers his little game.


FarFromHome
Valinor


Mar 24 2007, 10:07am

Post #13 of 20 (86 views)
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Riddles in the dark [In reply to] Can't Post

1. As we’ll want to remember in May, Beowulf was little known until it was transcribed in in the late eighteenth century from the only known manuscript copy – a copy that had been burned in a house fire in 1731. (It was published in the early nineteenth century.) Tolkien’s imagining of a similarly destroyed manuscript must owe something to Beowulf – but why does it appear here?

The Book of Mazarbul, like Beowulf, is a story that has miraculously survived to bear witness to a lost time. I love the fact that Gandalf is careful to arrange for the Book's preservation, by giving it to Gimli, just as I'm sure Tolkien would have loved to be able to do for all those lost Anglo-Saxon manuscripts that we'll presumably now never have.

2. These “facsimile” pages were created alongside the Moria chapter, but were not published with it. Did you first read an edition with them or without them? What effect does their inclusion have on the reading experience? How would you publish them?


I've never had an edition of the book that included these. I don't think I would ever have made the effort to interpret them, and if I had, I'd be disappointed to find they were written in English! Tolkien is providing a neat little "exercise for the reader" in allowing him/her to play the medievalist's game, but because he's not used original languages, only original scripts, he's made the job easier but (to my mind at least) ultimately unsatisfying.

3. University honour’s course essay question:

These pages are supposed fascimiles of manuscripts inside a book that is a supposed translation of a supposed copy of a supposed manuscript book. Say something clever about that.

Here's where things really do get tricky! If these are "real" pages from the original manuscript, that somehow found their way into some later (Gondorian?) copy of the Red Book, why are they in English? Clearly, the "modern translator" must have taken the liberty of translating the pages into English, then retranscribing the English words into ancient script, and reworking that into a copy of the pages in which he reproduces the effects of the damage! The "translator" of the children's-story Hobbit provides English-language puzzles, but it is appropriate for The Lord of the Rings? Wouldn't it be better to provide pages in both the original language and the original script? (Although I don't think Tolkien ever did combine his scripts and his languages - he seems to have written his languages mostly in English characters, and presented his scripts separately, at least if I'm remembering squire's study of the relevant Appendices correctly.)

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


FarFromHome
Valinor


Mar 24 2007, 10:42am

Post #14 of 20 (75 views)
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I'd be far from sure [In reply to] Can't Post

that the idea of Gimli keeping and treasuring the Book of Mazarbul is simply an excuse to explain the drawings. To me, it seems like the pure expression of Tolkien's own scholarly instinct. I think he'd believe in the almost sacred duty to rescue every scrap of Story that has survived from the past. Before the printing press ushered in the age of mass communication, every document was potentially the only copy of something that would be lost forever if the document was lost. Gimli taking the book had always struck me as a satisfyingly right thing to do, long before I read of the existence of the facsimile pages.

I think you're on very safe ground, though, in saying that LotR doesn't read like a memoir. That's surely too modern a concept, with its emphasis on the author, rather than on the Story itself. I find it more satisfying to think of it as an ancient manuscript, preserved and recopied time and time again, by scribes and copyists who believed, in those pre-copyright, pre-individualist days, that it was their right and duty to add to and "improve" the text as they copied. No individual author is important - it's the story itself that matters. This is the ethos of the craftsman-storyteller, as opposed to the modern, personal author who focuses on his own perspective, and who has the uncontested "right" - in terms of copyright - to preserve his work free from unauthorized changes or copying.

Even so, I agree that LotR never draws attention to the fact that it's anything but a straightforward story. If you want to add this extra layer of complexity, it's really up to you, the individual reader, to take the hints from the Prologue and keep them in the back of your mind as you read. For me, that reflects the idea of the craftsman-writer, never forcing his interpretation on the story, but allowing every reader to recreate it in his or her own way.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Mar 24 2007, 2:08pm

Post #15 of 20 (76 views)
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It always seemed odd to me that Gimli took the book. [In reply to] Can't Post

Not odd that he'd want to take it, but odd that he could. I imagined it a huge tome, like in the movie, and pictured him lugging it through all the subsequent battles and adventures. I suppose if it were a little pocket-sized diary it would make more sense.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Chance Meeting at Rivendell: a Tolkien Fanfic
and some other stuff I wrote...
leleni at hotmail dot com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


FarFromHome
Valinor


Mar 24 2007, 3:42pm

Post #16 of 20 (79 views)
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It certainly woud be hard [In reply to] Can't Post

to cram the movie Book of Mazarbul into your backpack! Maybe it was more like the movie Red Book, that Bilbo slips into his pack quite handily.

But in a written story you don't have to worry so much about exactly how people manage to carry things, I guess. Even the Phial of Galadriel and Sam's box of earth have always struck me as being difficult to carry all that way, especially in Mordor, when the hobbits had hardly any clothing left to carry them in.

And then, Tolkien himself probably had the experience in WWI of carrying a very heavy pack indeed, with personal treasures like books and photos tucked into it, worth the extra weight for the sense of connection to home that they provided.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


FarFromHome
Valinor


Mar 24 2007, 9:05pm

Post #17 of 20 (79 views)
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Sorry, I meant *would* be hard [In reply to] Can't Post

That's what happens when I post in a hurry - I was supposed to be on my way out the door at the time!

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


squire
Valinor


Mar 26 2007, 3:48am

Post #18 of 20 (67 views)
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Illustration or mock manuscript? [In reply to] Can't Post

1. As we’ll want to remember in May, Beowulf was little known until it was transcribed in in the late eighteenth century from the only known manuscript copy – a copy that had been burned in a house fire in 1731. (It was published in the early nineteenth century.) Tolkien’s imagining of a similarly destroyed manuscript must owe something to Beowulf – but why does it appear here?

Why not? This is the point in the story where Tolkien conceived of a discovered manuscript corpus that could drive the plot.

I'd like to interject here that in the much-maligned J. R. R. Tolkien Encyclopedia, Michael Drout's article on "Manuscripts, Medieval" links the Book of Mazarbul not just with the burned manuscript of Beowulf, but also with the slashed manuscript of the Ragyndrudis Codex, which St. Boniface used to protect himself from his sword-wielding assassins.

2. These "facsimile" pages were created alongside the Moria chapter, but were not published with it. Did you first read an edition with them or without them? What effect does their inclusion have on the reading experience? How would you publish them?
Of course I, like most people, read the LotR without the illustrated pages that Tolkien so cherished.

Frankly, I find Tolkien's work unconvincing and fake-looking. I just can't imagine the combination of flame, sword and age that results in a page of a bound book looking like that; whereas Gandalf's description and struggle to make out words in the dim light reads just right.

And as many people have noted, the use of English as the language behind the runes betrays the entire venture as a gigantic fake-out. OK for The Hobbit, but this is The Lord of the Rings, dammit. If I was a publisher, I'd tell Tolkien he was shooting himself in the foot to include such patent stagecraft in a romance like LotR, and refuse to print the damn things.

3. University honour’s course essay question:
These pages are supposed fascimiles of manuscripts inside a book that is a supposed translation of a supposed copy of a supposed manuscript book. Say something clever about that.

As others have noted, this is the big problem. Gimli may have preserved the Book of Mazarbul, but why would pages from it have been included in the Red Book of Westmarch, the supposed manuscript source for The Lord of the Rings? Even if the pages themselves had been expressed to the Shire from Erebor (or Agalarond), for inclusion in the hobbits' Book (an almost inconceivable gesture by the dwarves) why would later scribes take the time to replicate the physical state of the pages in question, rather than copy out the best fair rendering of the surviving text as they could? And the English language suggests that the entire thing was re-rendered by "discoverer/translator" Tolkien's publisher; again, why?
A related topic is the map of Erebor in The Hobbit. Critics have noted that it must be Bilbo's "illustration" of the map he was shown at Bag End at the beginning of his adventure, rather than the map itself. Similarly, the pages of the book of Mazarbul would be illustrations, rather than the real thing, and if so how likely is it that pre-modern scribes and artisans would reproduce the physical state of the pages in question, rather than their contents?



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Footeramas: The 3rd TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion; and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


Elizabeth
Valinor


Mar 26 2007, 7:54pm

Post #19 of 20 (76 views)
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Maybe he parked it in Lothlorien for safe keeping?/ [In reply to] Can't Post

 




Queen Mary II approaching Honolulu harbor
February 9, 2007, 7:30 am


Elizabeth is the TORnsib formerly known as 'erather'


Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Apr 4 2007, 1:22am

Post #20 of 20 (72 views)
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a kind of homage [In reply to] Can't Post

The effect of the pages is that they give weight to the whole concept of this being a real history. They have the feel of something deserving of great reverence, having great value to the Dwarves both personally and for historical records.

The also pull the Dwarves out of Disney/nursery hell that the have been shoved aside into until Tolkien came along giving them respectability as a culture of mythology.

They reflect a few things as well… (that Tolkien may have personal experience with) such as soldiers trapped by enemy in battle and these are their last dying words. His devotion to the pages may be way for paying respect to that experience to long lost friends. Putting that experience into his masterpiece keeps them from fading away into obscurity. Much like he may have felt about the stories of the legends so close to heart as well. It is a kind of homage to both.

Alan Lee Discussion week: starts March 25th in the Reading Room
Discussion Ideas, Alan Lee–Introduction, Scanned images for Alan Lee Discussion.

Art Gallery Revised, ORC pic of Hawaii friends, my drawings,
Aloha & Mahalo, Websites Directory
Nienna: “ those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta

 
 

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