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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: TV Discussion: The Rings of Power:
Mystics belong to a race never seen before on screen, according to director Wayne Che Yip

DeadRabbits
Lorien


Sep 28, 7:34am

Post #1 of 20 (819 views)
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Mystics belong to a race never seen before on screen, according to director Wayne Che Yip Can't Post

In an interview with Screen Rant, director Wayne Che Yip says that the Mystics (The Dweller, The Nomad and The Ascetic) belong to a race and a culture never before seen on screen, but who is mentioned in the text:


Quote
What I fear [is] that anything that I say is gonna give that bit way, just because there's... It's meant to be a little tease for the second half of the season. And so, I don't feel I can say anything without massively spoiling what's to come. But needless to say, it was exciting to introduce a different culture and a different race of people that have been mentioned in the text but never seen... We will know exactly who they are and where they come from, which plays a big part in that particular storyline.


From before, we know that Bridie Sisson's character The Dweller (and most likely the other two as well) comes from Rhûn, based on an interview with executive producer Lindsey Weber:


Quote
We are enjoying all the speculation online and can tell you Bridie Sisson is an incredible actor. We also thought fans might like to know that her character is traveling from far to the east—from the lands of Rhûn…


What race or culture could they possibly belong to? We have seen Easterlings before (in TTT), so that rules them out. And they don't look particularly Elvish, so I doubt that they're Avari.


Now now Bill, you swore this was a battle between warriors, not a bunch of miss nancies, so warriors is what I brought


Archestratie
Rohan


Sep 28, 9:51am

Post #2 of 20 (760 views)
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Hmm [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
In an interview with Screen Rant, director Wayne Che Yip says that the Mystics (The Dweller, The Nomad and The Ascetic) belong to a race and a culture never before seen on screen, but who is mentioned in the text:


Quote
What I fear [is] that anything that I say is gonna give that bit way, just because there's... It's meant to be a little tease for the second half of the season. And so, I don't feel I can say anything without massively spoiling what's to come. But needless to say, it was exciting to introduce a different culture and a different race of people that have been mentioned in the text but never seen... We will know exactly who they are and where they come from, which plays a big part in that particular storyline.


From before, we know that Bridie Sisson's character The Dweller (and most likely the other two as well) comes from Rhûn, based on an interview with executive producer Lindsey Weber:


Quote
We are enjoying all the speculation online and can tell you Bridie Sisson is an incredible actor. We also thought fans might like to know that her character is traveling from far to the east—from the lands of Rhûn…


What race or culture could they possibly belong to? We have seen Easterlings before (in TTT), so that rules them out. And they don't look particularly Elvish, so I doubt that they're Avari.


They're probably woses.

My Low-Magic Fantasy Novel on eBook/hardback: The Huntsman and the She-Wolf

The Huntsman and the She-Wolf on audio Book.


Narvi
Lorien

Sep 28, 11:42am

Post #3 of 20 (741 views)
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I assume he’s just mistaken [In reply to] Can't Post

If they’ve come from Rhun, and they are Men, then they would formerly be classified as Easterlings. Whether they choose to apply a different/more specific ethnonym to them in the show is another question. Perhaps they’ll pull Third Age terms like Balchoth or Wainriders out, although neither of those seem to fit.

Anyone get a look at their ears?


UtumnoSkirmish
The Shire


Sep 28, 1:16pm

Post #4 of 20 (707 views)
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The Druedain? [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't think we've ever seen them before. I jus browsed the section in Unfinished Tales- some details fit (i.e. magical prowess), many don't.


Narvi
Lorien

Sep 28, 1:43pm

Post #5 of 20 (695 views)
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Drugs [In reply to] Can't Post

I do hope we see some of this noble clan in the show. We know they lived among the (surprisingly egalitarian) people of Haleth, who seem to be the antecedent for Numenor's gender roles in show!canon.

I sincerely doubt that the pale blond mystics constitute members of the Druedain. The way they are described in RotK and Unfinished Tales is completely different, including their style of magic. Not to mention that they were notorious Sauron/orc-hunters.


Michelle Johnston
Rohan


Sep 28, 2:52pm

Post #6 of 20 (672 views)
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Avari or Easterlings [In reply to] Can't Post

Given Rhun's importance on the Great Journey and Orome's visits, they have to be a race that remained behind quid pro quo we have not seen them yet and our trio have now come West.

We have yet to see their ears (I think) and all three characters are played by women so pass as Elves more easily, which might suggest they are Avari who remained behind and worshipped Morgoth. For them to know the meaning of the crater might imply long-lived fallen Elves. It is of course a riff on the three wise men who followed a heavenly body to its source.

My Dear Bilbo something is the matter with you! you are not the same hobbit that you were.


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Sep 28, 7:04pm

Post #7 of 20 (623 views)
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Variags? [In reply to] Can't Post

The only (presumed) Mannish race I can think of that fits the bill is the Variags of Khand, though I wouldn't expect them to look so pale.

Come to think on it, could the Mystics be Lossoth? Maybe a more Eastern branch of the Forodwaith?

#FidelityToTolkien
#ChallengeExpectations

(This post was edited by Otaku-sempai on Sep 28, 7:06pm)


Eldy
Tol Eressea


Sep 29, 8:56am

Post #8 of 20 (516 views)
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I assume they are from an Eastern human culture [In reply to] Can't Post

"Easterling" is an extremely broad exonym used by Gondorians to describe all the peoples living in the vicinity of the Sea of Rhûn or further east—i.e., a large percentage of Middle-earth. There is no singular Easterling culture, nor is there any reason to think all humans living east of Rhovanion are of the same race.


Eldy
Tol Eressea


Sep 29, 9:00am

Post #9 of 20 (517 views)
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I think it's at least equally likely... [In reply to] Can't Post

...that the Mystics are from a culture invented for the show rather than one Tolkien named. We know there were unnamed human peoples to the east, some of which were influenced by the Blue Wizards according to one text (though I'm not saying I think that's the case for the Mystics' culture). It's not even really a change for the show to fill in the blanks there.

I don't expect the Mystics came from the far north(east).


TFP
Rivendell


Sep 29, 9:09am

Post #10 of 20 (509 views)
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Variags? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
The only (presumed) Mannish race I can think of that fits the bill is the Variags of Khand, though I wouldn't expect them to look so pale...


In one of their two mentions in LOTR it seems to be implied that the Variags don't like sunlight, though the punctuation arguably makes this point a little ambiguous - you'd certainly expect pale skin from anyone who avoided the sun [I suppose this annoyed me a little bit about Disa]:


Quote
...East rode the knights of Dol Amroth driving the enemy before them: troll-men and Variags and orcs that hated the sunlight...



(This post was edited by TFP on Sep 29, 9:10am)


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Sep 29, 12:25pm

Post #11 of 20 (464 views)
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Sunlight [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

In Reply To
The only (presumed) Mannish race I can think of that fits the bill is the Variags of Khand, though I wouldn't expect them to look so pale...


In one of their two mentions in LOTR it seems to be implied that the Variags don't like sunlight, though the punctuation arguably makes this point a little ambiguous - you'd certainly expect pale skin from anyone who avoided the sun [I suppose this annoyed me a little bit about Disa]:


Quote
...East rode the knights of Dol Amroth driving the enemy before them: troll-men and Variags and orcs that hated the sunlight...



I would say that "hated the sunlight" only applies in that sentence to the orcs. As an aside, I admit that I've never been entirely comfortable with the descriptor "troll-men" being used for the Southron warriors from Far Harad.

#FidelityToTolkien
#ChallengeExpectations


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Sep 29, 12:29pm

Post #12 of 20 (464 views)
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Likely? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I think it's at least equally likely...
...that the Mystics are from a culture invented for the show rather than one Tolkien named.


That would contradict the information related in the leak which specified that it was a culture mentioned in the text. If the leak is accurate than this should not be a culture invented for the show.

#FidelityToTolkien
#ChallengeExpectations


TFP
Rivendell


Sep 29, 3:40pm

Post #13 of 20 (448 views)
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Slight ambiguity [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

In Reply To
...
In one of their two mentions in LOTR it seems to be implied that the Variags don't like sunlight, though the punctuation arguably makes this point a little ambiguous - you'd certainly expect pale skin from anyone who avoided the sun [I suppose this annoyed me a little bit about Disa]:


Quote
...East rode the knights of Dol Amroth driving the enemy before them: troll-men and Variags and orcs that hated the sunlight...



I would say that "hated the sunlight" only applies in that sentence to the orcs...


This is a textbook illustration of why the Oxford comma is so often necessary. Though if you write as well as Tolkien you can pretty much make up the rules as you go along, with here there seemingly being no need for commas at all.


(This post was edited by TFP on Sep 29, 3:52pm)


Narvi
Lorien

Sep 29, 3:59pm

Post #14 of 20 (437 views)
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troll-men [In reply to] Can't Post

Yeah, it's an uncomfortable reminder of another time and mindset. I circumvent it by thinking that this is literal rather than purely descriptive. "Man-trolls" created by Sauron or his agents in the south rather than trollish Southrons.


Archestratie
Rohan


Sep 29, 5:00pm

Post #15 of 20 (415 views)
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Agreed! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

In Reply To

In Reply To
...
In one of their two mentions in LOTR it seems to be implied that the Variags don't like sunlight, though the punctuation arguably makes this point a little ambiguous - you'd certainly expect pale skin from anyone who avoided the sun [I suppose this annoyed me a little bit about Disa]:


Quote
...East rode the knights of Dol Amroth driving the enemy before them: troll-men and Variags and orcs that hated the sunlight...



I would say that "hated the sunlight" only applies in that sentence to the orcs...


This is a textbook illustration of why the Oxford comma is so often necessary. Though if you write as well as Tolkien you can pretty much make up the rules as you go along, with here there seemingly being no need for commas at all.


I am very pro-Oxford comma for this very reason. Honestly, clarity is far more important than efficiency. Businesses and organizations have lost millions in lawsuits due to the fact they omitted the Oxford comma. I wish that tradition would die.

My Low-Magic Fantasy Novel on eBook/hardback: The Huntsman and the She-Wolf

The Huntsman and the She-Wolf on audio Book.


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Sep 29, 10:08pm

Post #16 of 20 (362 views)
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"Men like half-trolls" [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Yeah, it's an uncomfortable reminder of another time and mindset. I circumvent it by thinking that this is literal rather than purely descriptive. "Man-trolls" created by Sauron or his agents in the south rather than trollish Southrons.


Unfortunately, that illusion is somewhat broken by an earlier passage taken from "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields":


Quote
...and out of Far Harad black men like half-trolls [emphasis mine] with white eyes and red tongues.


I do imagine that these warriors might have been given some narcotic root or something similar that has had an effect on their appearance. Also, we must keep in mind that we are seeing them from the perspective of the defending Gondorians.

#FidelityToTolkien
#ChallengeExpectations


Archestratie
Rohan


Sep 30, 9:44am

Post #17 of 20 (301 views)
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Heh [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

In Reply To
Yeah, it's an uncomfortable reminder of another time and mindset. I circumvent it by thinking that this is literal rather than purely descriptive. "Man-trolls" created by Sauron or his agents in the south rather than trollish Southrons.


Unfortunately, that illusion is somewhat broken by an earlier passage taken from "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields":


Quote
...and out of Far Harad black men like half-trolls [emphasis mine] with white eyes and red tongues.


I do imagine that these warriors might have been given some narcotic root or something similar that has had an effect on their appearance...


That sounds like some head-canon to me.

My Low-Magic Fantasy Novel on eBook/hardback: The Huntsman and the She-Wolf

The Huntsman and the She-Wolf on audio Book.


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Sep 30, 2:07pm

Post #18 of 20 (260 views)
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Yes. [In reply to] Can't Post

 A chewed narcotic causing the pupils of the eyes to shrink and coloring tongues a bright red? Oh, definitely head-canon. But plausible.

#FidelityToTolkien
#ChallengeExpectations

(This post was edited by Otaku-sempai on Sep 30, 2:11pm)


Bladerunner
Gondor


Oct 1, 12:17am

Post #19 of 20 (203 views)
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I wonder what he means by race... [In reply to] Can't Post

In Tolkien's world "race" is used to distinguish Elves, Dwarves and Man/Halflings/Druedain, from one another, so I wonder if he means another race in the context of the legendarium or if he just means another ethnic or cultural group within the race of Men.

I suspect it is the latter, otherwise this would be another deviation from the lore.


Eldy
Tol Eressea


Oct 1, 12:23am

Post #20 of 20 (200 views)
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Like you, I assume he means a new subdivision of humans... [In reply to] Can't Post

...if only by process of elimination, since we've already seen all the major fantasy races of Arda—Elves, Dwarves, Humans, Hobbits (if you count them separately), and Orcs—and the Mystics are clearly not Ents, trolls, or talking birds.

 
 

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