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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Reading Room:
''Envinyatar''...

Paulo Gabriel
Fantastic Four

Dec 18 2020, 6:25am

Post #1 of 9 (1527 views)
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''Envinyatar''... Can't Post

Envinyatar. Where is that word/concept mentioned in LOTR? Or in other works of the Professor, for that matter?


squire
Asgardian


Dec 18 2020, 1:22pm

Post #2 of 9 (1493 views)
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Aragorn uses the word to describe his mystical role as "The Renewer". [In reply to] Can't Post

I found it in LotR V.8, 'The Houses of Healing', where he responds to Imrahil's doubt that 'Strider', as Pippin has just addressed Aragorn, is a fit name for one who claims the throne of Gondor.
But Imrahil said to Éomer: ‘Is it thus that we speak to our kings? Yet maybe he will wear his crown in some other name!’
And Aragorn hearing him, turned and said: ‘Verily, for in the high tongue of old I am Elessar, the Elfstone, and Envinyatar, the Renewer’: and he lifted from his breast the green stone that lay there. ‘But Strider shall be the name of my house, if that be ever established. In the high tongue it will not sound so ill, and Telcontar I will be and all the heirs of my body.’
What I always notice about this exchange is actually the 'heigh style', as Tolkien jokingly called it, of the writing, with paragraphs larded with conjunctions like But and And. Aragorn's diction gets more elevated too, with 'Verily', 'the high tongue', 'if that ever be', 'not sound so ill', 'all the heirs of my body'. The language, more than the content of his speech, tells us that Aragorn is revving up to be King, finally.



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N.E. Brigand
Asgardian


Dec 18 2020, 3:47pm

Post #3 of 9 (1484 views)
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Was this word missing from the first edition of LOTR? [In reply to] Can't Post

My vague recollection from Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull's The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion is that either this word was accidentally omitted from The Lord of the Rings as originally published, or that Tolkien decided to add it for the mid-1960s second edition.


Treachery, treachery I fear; treachery of that miserable creature.

But so it must be. Let us remember that a traitor may betray himself and do good that he does not intend.


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squire
Asgardian


Dec 18 2020, 6:56pm

Post #4 of 9 (1474 views)
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Such erudition! [In reply to] Can't Post

That's a new one to me, so looking it up, I see even your vague recollections are reliable. As H&S tell us, apropos of nothing, the Elvish term was added not in the second edition per se, but in the "second printing of the second Allen & Unwin edition (1967)". For whatever reason, they don't provide the earlier text for Aragorn's speech in the first edition, and second edition first printing - that is, they don't tell us how the sentence went without this single added word Evinyatar in it.

The best resource I have for this question is the American Ballantine paperback (the one with the Barbara Remington cover art) of LotR - a 1972 umpteenth printing from the original issue of 1965. Checking, I see that yes, the Elvish word has not yet been added. Presumably this, then, is the earlier text of Aragorn's speech going back to the first publication of RotK:
" ‘Verily, for in the high tongue of old I am Elessar, the Elfstone, and the Renewer’: ..." (LR V.8)
And so I'm left wondering what was meant here? Is Aragorn saying that Elessar is Elvish with two meanings, "Elfstone" and "Renewer"? Or does "Elfstone" only apply to Elessar, and the comma indicates that he is also known in the high tongue as "the Renewer", without actually supplying the Elvish word that was later added in 1967? Was Envinyatar accidently dropped from the proofs back in the fifties? Or did Tolkien only notice the unclarity of Aragorn's pronouncement after the second edition came out, with the Elvish word (perhaps) still missing despite his best efforts in 1965??

And finally, for the real text fans - why is Elessar not italicized in the first edition and in the second edition first printing, but when Envinyatar was finally added, suddenly both Elessar and its new best friend Envinyatar are set in italics - the better to match the italicization later in the paragraph of the Elvish - sorry, High Tongue - word Telcontar?

Gee.

I don't usually talk like this. I expect I've been spending too much time with the more gonzo bibilophiles and edition collectors on the UK Tolkien Society FB page...



squire online:
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Hamfast Gamgee
X-men

Dec 19 2020, 10:37pm

Post #5 of 9 (1391 views)
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Good catch! [In reply to] Can't Post

I have never noticed that one before. And I thought that I knew my Tolkien quotes. I must check to see if my edition of Lotr has that quote.


Elthir
X-men


Dec 20 2020, 7:17pm

Post #6 of 9 (1368 views)
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my 8th impression is . . . [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
" ‘Verily, for in the high tongue of old I am Elessar, the Elfstone, and the Renewer’: ..." (LR V.8)


That's the quote as it appears in my First Edition [Eighth Impression 1959].

According to my reading of HOME here, the word Envinyatar does not seem to have been dropped accidentally -- Christopher Tolkien does note that it was added for the Second Edition, but at least in the chapter concerned, the word isn't found (or noted) in the drafts.


Elthir
X-men


Dec 20 2020, 7:45pm

Post #7 of 9 (1365 views)
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a related something [In reply to] Can't Post

In Morgoth's Ring . . . Arda Envinyanta occurs for "Arda Healed"

Slightly different, but folks more knowledgeable than me have surmised: "envinyanta passive participle "healed" pointing to a verbal stem *envinyata- "heal, renew" (Parf Edhellen)

My more limited linguistic skills can see vinya in there at least, as in Vinyamar, Vinyalonde . . .


Hasuwandil
Fantastic Four


Dec 21 2020, 3:33pm

Post #8 of 9 (1347 views)
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New again [In reply to] Can't Post

And vinya means "new" or "young" in Quenya. Vinyalondë was the "New Haven" established by the Númenórean Prince Aldarion on the west coast of Middle-earth, and Vinyamar was the "New Home" built by Turgon, also on the west coast of Middle-earth (before Beleriand was sunk), after the Noldor left Valinor.

The same element (in Sindarin) is found in the middle of Dorwinion, which, rather redundantly, means something like "Land of Young-land", and which was supposed to be a place on Tol Eressëa before Tolkien repurposed the name for The Hobbit.

But, getting back to the sense of envinya-, a word with the same meaning occurs in one of Théoden's titles (in Appendix A): Théoden Ednew, which he was called after returning to lead his kingdom in the Battle of the Hornburg. Here "ed-" is the native English prefix meaning "again" or "back", which in Modern English has been almost totally replaced by the the Latin prefix "re-". It still occurs in a few words, perhaps most notably "eddy", which is water that has reversed its course. Interesting that a prefix of the same meaning occurs as en- in Quenya and ad- in Sindarin.

Hêlâ Auriwandil, angilô berhtost,
oƀar Middangard mannum gisandid!


Hêlâ Auriwandil, angilô berhtost,
oƀar Middangard mannum gisandid!


(This post was edited by Hasuwandil on Dec 21 2020, 3:38pm)


Paulo Gabriel
Fantastic Four

Jan 15, 3:50pm

Post #9 of 9 (1293 views)
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Awesome, guys. [In reply to] Can't Post

I never even knew this word had such a complex and long story behind it! It's just one word I saw in a review of the third movie, and it intrigued me, because I didn't remember it at all being in the book(s) (although, I read LOTR only once in 2005 and I am reading it for a second time only this year).

You people sure do some serious homework regarding Tolkien! Cool

 
 

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