Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: Off Topic:
It's the Valentine's Day reading thread!

Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 11, 3:39pm

Post #1 of 4 (305 views)
Shortcut
It's the Valentine's Day reading thread! Can't Post

A happy Valentine's Day with lots of chocolate to everyone who takes notice of the holiday! Heart

On paper, I've started The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan, a quirky novel set in contemporary England. The premise is that an elderly gentleman collects small items, things he finds lying in gutters, and so forth, all to compensate for his fiancée's sudden death 40 years earlier.
So far we've heard the backstories of a couple of the items, as well as his housekeeper's life story. According to the cover copy, she inherits his collection when he passes on....

I'm enjoying it so far, even though the backstories of the items can be just a bit difficult to follow.

I've listened to short BBC dramatizations of two of Agatha Christie's Poirot novels, After the Funeral and Halloween Party. They're presented very well, all in dialog, although by their very nature are a bit rushed.

I'm now listening to another Donna Leon Inspector Brunetti book, Dressed for Death. In this installment, Brunetti is temporarily reassigned from Venice to Mestre, a town just across the causeway to the mainland, to work on a murder case. It's summertime, and hot, and his family has gone off to the mountains on vacation, and he find the case disturbing.

One thing I like about Leon's series is that Brunetti is a family man, content in his private life, not one of those sleuths who's more messed up than the criminal.

So what have you been reading?

Where now the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing?
Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing?
Where is the hand on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing?
Where is the spring and the harvest and the tall corn growing?
They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow;
The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow....


Annael
Immortal


Feb 12, 3:16am

Post #2 of 4 (262 views)
Shortcut
The Soul of America by Jon Meacham [In reply to] Can't Post

the purpose of which is to show that American politics have always been divisive & nasty, but we make progress nonetheless.

He does see one particularly disturbing element that we have not encountered before, but I daren't say more than that.

I've also been reading "City of Girls" by Elizabeth Gilbert. In 1940 a wealthy young woman flunks out of Vassar and gets sent to live with her theater-owning aunt in New York City - and runs wild until she messes up big-time. Can't say I like the main character, or indeed many of the characters. But it's well written.

Another book on the bedside table is "The 10,000 Doors of January," also well-written, about a young woman at the turn of the last century who would like to run wild, but is - so far - being controlled in vicious ways by unscrupulous men. I assume it's going to turn out well but I'm not reading it right before bed.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around … The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967
my blog: https://jodybower.com/myths-archetypes-in-film/


Kelly of Water's Edge
Rohan

Feb 12, 3:23pm

Post #3 of 4 (215 views)
Shortcut
If you want a more cynical take on that theme [In reply to] Can't Post

you might like "Scandalmonger" by William Safire if you can find it. It's a fictional story based on the mudslinging, backstage dealings and tabloid writings during the Adams and Jefferson administrations, made more remarkable by the fact that at the time the country didn't even know if England was going to re-attack. Think "Wag the Dog" in a Colonial American setting and you won't be that far off. Kind of depressing to think that the worst parts of American politics were in place pretty much as soon as Washington announced he was stepping down. Out of the major politicians depicted - Adams, Hamilton, Burr, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe - some come off worse than others.


Annael
Immortal


Feb 12, 3:54pm

Post #4 of 4 (208 views)
Shortcut
I've read about how nasty that campaign was [In reply to] Can't Post


Quote
Jefferson's camp accused President Adams of having a "hideous hermaphroditical character, which has neither the force and firmness of a man, nor the gentleness and sensibility of a woman." In return, Adams' men called Vice President Jefferson "a mean-spirited, low-lived fellow, the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father."As the slurs piled on, Adams was labeled a fool, a hypocrite, a criminal, and a tyrant, while Jefferson was branded a weakling, an atheist, a libertine, and a coward. Even Martha Washington succumbed to the propaganda, telling a clergyman that Jefferson was "one of the most detestable of mankind."


Sounds familiar, doesn't it! We like to believe in a better past, but . . . it wasn't.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around … The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967
my blog: https://jodybower.com/myths-archetypes-in-film/


(This post was edited by Annael on Feb 12, 3:55pm)

 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.