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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Reading Room:
The Unofficial Bored of the Rings Discussion: Chapter IX, Minas Troney In the Soup, Part 1: The Cake is a Lie

dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jan 30, 3:01am

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The Unofficial Bored of the Rings Discussion: Chapter IX, Minas Troney In the Soup, Part 1: The Cake is a Lie Can't Post

Welcome to the continuing spasmodic discussion of the Harvard Lampoon's Bored of the Rings. Squire and I have posted the previous chapters previously (the easiest way to find them is to search the Reading Room for Bored of the Rings in the subject line). Have you never read this precious tome? Then you are in for a treat - or retreat, as the case may be!

The action picks up as the wizard Goodgulf and the two boggies, Moxie and Pepsi, have taken leave of Stomper, Gimlet, Legolam, Eorache of Roi-Tan, and Birdseye, lord of the Vee-Ates. I've interspersed some comments/questions, please feel free to comment/question as you feel so moved. Quoted text is in bold italics.


The evening sun was setting, as is its wont, in the west as Goodgulf, Moxie, and Pepsi reined in their exhausted merinos at the gates of Minas Troney. The boggies were dazzled by the fabled capital of all Twodor, Stronghold of the West and Lower Middle Earth's largest producer of crude oil, yo-yos, and emery wheels.

1. Could the sun set anywhere but in the west? (Trick question - if Lower Middle Earth has a legendarium similar to that of Middle-earth.)
2. It's a short hop from Minas Tirith to Minas Troney. What other names would make good parodies?


Surrounding the townlands were the Plains of Pellegranor, whose earth was rich with many an oast and garner, not to mention wide tilths, folds, byres, rippling rills, and rolling ferndocks. The desultory Effluvium washed these green lands and year after year provided the ingrate residents with bumper crops of salamanders and anopheles mosquitoes. It was little wonder that the city drew multitudes of pointed-headed Southrons, thick-lipped Northrons, and inverted Ailerons. It was the only place where they could get a passport out of Twodor.

- Notice the clever insertion of a syllable to alter "Pellenor" to more resemble a disease: "Pellagra is a disease caused by low levels of niacin, also known as vitamin B-3. It's marked by dementia, diarrhea, and dermatitis, also known as “the three Ds”. If left untreated, pellagra can be fatal." The first of these characteristics will shortly come into play.
- Well, that first sentence certainly uses up the Professor's description of the Pellenor in one fell swoop! What is a "ferndock"?
- "Anduin" becomes "Effluvium", which is a fine description of many rivers back when this was written in the '60s. I attended college in a town bordered by a then-typical Maine river, and the joke among students was that it was safe to throw yourself off the local bridge if you failed a test - the water was so polluted, you couldn't sink.
- What do you think of the expansion on "Southron"? I'm assuming the inverted Ailerons are fly-bys.


The city itself dated back to the Olden Days when Beltelephon the Senile decreed rather inexplicably that there be built in this flat land a royal ski lodge of wondrous beauty. Unfortunately the old King cashed in before he saw ground broken and his hydrocephalic son, Nabisco the Incompetent, typically misread the late codger's vague blueprints and ordered somewhat more prestressed concrete than necessary for the original design. The result was Minas Troney or "Nabisco's Folly".

- "Beltelephon", is, of course, a parody of Bell Telephone, the massive monopoly affectionately known as "Ma Bell" back in the day.
- Follies are beloved architectural oddities of British whimsey. I wonder if Tolkien ever saw this one, in Kildare County, Ireland:



For no good reason, the city was made in seven concentric circles topped with a commemorative double statue of Beltelephon and his favorite concubine, whose name was either Nephritis the Obese or Phyllis. In any case the final architectural effect was that of an Italian wedding cake.* [* The historian Bocaraton notes that this may have been intentionally "emblematic of the crumbs inside".]

- Ah, the afflictions of the king: nephritis and 'phyllis.
- I wonder if the authors visited Boca Raton, Florida during Spring Break.
- Italian wedding cake:




Each ring was higher than the next, as were the rents. In the lowest, seventh ring dwelt the city's sturdy yeomen. Oft they could be seen dutifully polishing their brightly colored yeos for some idiotic festival or other. In the sixth ring dwelt tradesmen, warriors in the fifth, and so on to the first and highest level, wherein dwelt the Great Stewards and dentists. Each level was reached by means of wind-powered escalators in constant need of repair so that the social climber of these ancient times was just that. Each ring was proud of its own history and showed its scorn of that beneath it by daily bombardments of refuse, and expressions such as "Let's go seventhing" and "Dahling, don't be so third-level" were common.* [* It is not known upon whom the refuse of the lowest ring was thrown, but it is conjectured that it was not thrown at all, but eaten.] Each level was obliquely protected by outthrusting battlements corniced and groined at the odd enjambments. Each odd enjambment was set perpendicular to every even adjacent one-way thoroughfare. Needless to say, the inhabitants were always late for their appointments, if not totally lost.

- Considering the city's main products, what do you think a "yeo" is? Were they polished with the emery wheels?
- Dentists must have been Important People in the '60s.
- This distribution of refuse begs the question: how would the residents of Minas Tirith handle their own waste?
- Try to draw an overhead view of Minas Troney.

(And who recognizes the end of this chapter part's title? Wink)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


sador
Half-elven


Jan 30, 2:44pm

Post #2 of 12 (367 views)
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So the author definitely aren't Jewish! [In reply to] Can't Post

If they were, they would clearly know that the counterpart to Chikken Noddule Are mandlakh.


You had to do that, didn't you? Here I am, trying to compose myself before leading the discussion of The Muster of Rohan next week - and you throw at me this curveball, turkey, whatever?!


The evening sun was setting, as is its wont, in the west as Goodgulf, Moxie, and Pepsi reined in their exhausted merinos at the gates of Minas Troney. The boggies were dazzled by the fabled capital of all Twodor, Stronghold of the West and Lower Middle Earth's largest producer of crude oil, yo-yos, and emery wheels.

1. Could the sun set anywhere but in the west? (Trick question - if Lower Middle Earth has a legendarium similar to that of Middle-earth.)
In that dubious case, not really. The moon, however, wanders more than Shelley's!
Art thou pale for weariness?

2. It's a short hop from Minas Tirith to Minas Troney. What other names would make good parodies?
In a short hop, nothing much. But with a hop-skip-jump, we could cover the whole Lake District! And have a proper vegetable soup - which will lead us back to Minas Troney, I fear.
So the answer is no.

On a short note regarding this passage -
Lower Middle Earth's largest producer of crude oil, yo-yos, and emery wheels.
Is the "crude oil" the atrocious vegetable oil in the soup? And how did they press it - it was it just ground in the emery wheels?

And the yo-yos clearly date the book. Where is the entrepreneur who would bring them spinning fidgets?


"Pellagra is a disease caused by low levels of niacin, also known as vitamin B-3. It's marked by dementia, diarrhea, and dermatitis, also known as “the three Ds”. If left untreated, pellagra can be fatal." The first of these characteristics will shortly come into play.
Frito could use the second, at the end of At the Sign of the Goode Eats - don't you think?

Well, that first sentence certainly uses up the Professor's description of the Pellenor in one fell swoop! What is a "ferndock"?
No idea. Should I google it?
Nah, I'll just wait for squire to answer.

"Anduin" becomes "Effluvium", which is a fine description of many rivers back when this was written in the '60s. I attended college in a town bordered by a then-typical Maine river, and the joke among students was that it was safe to throw yourself off the local bridge if you failed a test - the water was so polluted, you couldn't sink.
Did the water flow upstream?
If not, then I win. However, it has vastly improved since.

What do you think of the expansion on "Southron"? I'm assuming the inverted Ailerons are fly-bys.
Coming from flyover country?

If not for the exhortation not to mention politics, I would write something about the "ingrate residents" of the "fabled capital". But I won't.


The city itself dated back to the Olden Days when Beltelephon the Senile decreed rather inexplicably that there be built in this flat land a royal ski lodge of wondrous beauty. Unfortunately the old King cashed in before he saw ground broken and his hydrocephalic son, Nabisco the Incompetent, typically misread the late codger's vague blueprints and ordered somewhat more prestressed concrete than necessary for the original design. The result was Minas Troney or "Nabisco's Folly".

"Beltelephon", is, of course, a parody of Bell Telephone, the massive monopoly affectionately known as "Ma Bell" back in the day.
My father actually worked there for a while - in Bell Canada, to be more exact.
But I admit I have never caught the reference.

Follies are beloved architectural oddities of British whimsey.
Really? I didn't know that.
I have always assumed this is somehow connected to Almayer's_Folly, and never understood how exactly.

I have also assumed that Beltelephon the Senile decreed rather inexplicably that there be built in this flat land a royal ski lodge of wondrous beauty had something to do with Coleridge:


Quote

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree




Ah, the afflictions of the king: nephritis and 'phyllis.
Ah, the days when one could joke about obesity!

I wonder if the authors visited Boca Raton, Florida during Spring Break.
Probably they did. They likely read Boccachio as well - he had something to say about Italian wedding cakes, and about crumbs as well!



Considering the city's main products, what do you think a "yeo" is? Were they polished with the emery wheels?
That's a nice connection! It also sheds a new light on "doing yeomen work".

Dentists must have been Important People in the '60s.
And the authors hated them! Or at least couldn't afford them.
Didn't spring find them with greying teeth?
Perhaps like the inhabitants, they were always late for their appointments...

This distribution of refuse begs the question: how would the residents of Minas Tirith handle their own waste?
The desultory Effluvium is ready at hand.
But handling the waste is tricky - I guess they needed disposable latex gloves.

Try to draw an overhead view of Minas Troney.
Refuse.

And again, the "wind-powered escalators in constant need of repair" sound really tempting.



And who recognizes the end of this chapter part's title?
It sounded familiar, but I didn't remember what it meant - so I searched, and realized that I was not suppsed to recognize it.



Thinking about things I don't understand

(This post was edited by dernwyn on Feb 5, 4:17am)


noWizardme
Half-elven


Jan 31, 5:14pm

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So yeomen are people who play with yo-yos? Makes perfect sense [In reply to] Can't Post

 

In Reply To
In the lowest, seventh ring dwelt the city's sturdy yeomen. Oft they could be seen dutifully polishing their brightly colored yeos for some idiotic festival or other.


~~~~~~
"Yes, I am half-elven. No, it does not mean that I 'have one pointy ear' "
Sven Elven, proprietor of the Rivendell convenience store.


noWizardme
Half-elven


Jan 31, 7:27pm

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The Cake is a Lie? [In reply to] Can't Post

No idea, but at leastI saved you climbing all those stairs

[Caption a picture of a folly with lots of steps has been crudely modified to show an apparent pair of transportation portals in it, in the style of the video game Portal]

~~~~~~
"Yes, I am half-elven. No, it does not mean that I 'have one pointy ear' "
Sven Elven, proprietor of the Rivendell convenience store.


squire
Half-elven


Feb 2, 7:35pm

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Umm... What? What did you just post? Bless me! How long have I been asleep? [In reply to] Can't Post

It's good to be back in the saddles of our faithful merinos again. Thanks, dernwyn, for picking up the booby-prize, er, baton of glory, after a long hiatus (almost five years!).

1. Could the sun set anywhere but in the west? (Trick question - if Lower Middle Earth has a legendarium similar to that of Middle-earth.)
I think the gag is the inserted “as is its wont”, with its mock-medieval diction absurdly ascribing agency to the sun. Tolkien uses “as is/was his/her wont” more than enough times in LotR to rate this minor gag.

2. It's a short hop from Minas Tirith to Minas Troney. What other names would make good parodies?
It took me a while, on first reading (back in, oh, 1970), to get this gag of Minas Tirith = Minas Troney = i.e., Minestrone, the Italian country soup. I didn’t think it was their best naming gag, but I can’t think of any better ones that fit their general convention of replacing Tolkien’s noble-sounding names with bathetic parodies from popular American culture and advertising of the 1950s and 60s.

Oh, sure, I briefly imagined that the erudite Lampoon writers had realized, as later critics have, that Minas Tirith represents a kind of southern European, specifically Italian/Byzantine civilization in Lord of the Rings -- in contrast to the northern German/English lands to the north, from Rohan to the Shire. Thus their joke about Italian soup as the parody name of the capital city would really be a zinger. But then I woke up and realized it had all been a dream … um, that is, I realized that was el primo B.S. The ‘Poonies simply found a funny word that started with Minas. Witness their subsequent, completely stupid, joke that Minas Morgul isn’t Minas- or Mines- anything, but is simply another soup, Chicken Noodul, putting the gag on the final syllable ‘-ul’ (from Morgul). Shakestoor it isn’t, as someone once said.

Would anyone care to make the Andy Warhol connection? Anyone?

3. Notice the clever insertion of a syllable to alter "Pellenor" to more resemble a disease, pellagra.
Thanks for that! I don’t think I’d made that connection before, but you are undoubtedly right. And once in my head, it rang a faint bell that I checked out just now. Yes, pellagra was famously a disease that swept the rural American South in the early 20th century; this was due to the adoption of a less healthy diet of cornmeal, sugar, and meat when most of the land used to grow market vegetables was put over to cotton cultivation. The public health challenge to identify what vitamins were, and to overcome the effects of pellagra, would be in the recent memory of our gallant college authors in the 1960s, just like so many of their other references to 1920s-1950s America.

So here’s another keyword in the book that mocks the aristocratic elegance of Tolkien’s civilization with the distressed misery of America’s poorest and most ignorant backwaters. Not to mention it’s another obscurely humorous reference that most modern-day readers don’t get, as it has slipped too far into the past to be remembered.

4. Well, that first sentence certainly uses up the Professor's description of the Pellenor in one fell swoop! What is a "ferndock"?
Yes, it’s a remarkable example of their ability to filch much of Tolkien’s actual vocabulary at times, which keeps the whole unlikely project on target. As for ferndock, which is the only word in the list that is not in the original, I confess that Google has failed me here. I searched for the word as a botanical or agricultural term, but every hit on the ‘net cited Ferndock as a family name, presumably of English origin.

Now, the only possible explanation I found is that, in many kids’ locally-produced live-TV variety shows in the 1950s, there was a stock shout-out of “1 – 2 – 3, Roll ‘em, Ferndock!” that the kids would shriek when the host said it was time to show a film or cartoon. (Captain Kangaroo and Bozo the Clown are two such shows I remember from the Boston-area 1960s, but they didn’t have this gag as far as I can remember.) Did “Roll ‘em, Ferndock!” become “rolling ferndocks”?

So the best I can offer here is that the ‘Poonies remembered the phrase, thought it was funny in its meaninglessness and memorability, and added it to echo their poetic “rippling rills” (where the original text has “rills rippling”). As a bonus, Ferndock is also Tolkienian in its vaguely botanical etymology: ferns are ferns of course, and dock is a tasty edible weed popular in the Depression because it was free!

Well, if I’m right, we have yet another long-forgotten gag-montage from mid-century American culture.

5. "Anduin" becomes "Effluvium", which is a fine description of many rivers back when this was written in the '60s.
I’ve never felt the connection had to be quite so literal as referring to polluted rivers. Effluvium has always just meant a disgusting watery mess to me, no doubt crawling with mosquitoes and salamanders. Thus it’s a perfectly insulting substitute for the noble Great River of Middle-earth, with about the right number of u’s and i’s and m’s/n’s to enable the phonic connection.

6. What do you think of the expansion on "Southron"? I'm assuming the inverted Ailerons are fly-bys.
Typically witty expansion on Tolkien’s rediscovery of Southron for Southerner (the term was commonly used in the time of the American Civil War). I have always been intrigued by the adjectives: “pointy-headed, thick-lipped, inverted” but have never been able to develop just why they are used here; I guess I’ll speculate that each is an insulting adjective for a despised or marginal population group.

I am mildly surprised that the authors did not attempt to mock Westron, Tolkien’s name for his Common Tongue in Middle-earth: “Web-footed Westrons”? Swim-bys rather than fly-bys?

7. "Beltelephon", is, of course, a parody of Bell Telephone, the massive monopoly affectionately known as "Ma Bell" back in the day.
Yes, I got that one easily. Well-played, or perhaps well-dialed. I would guess this shows they mined the appendices, and before lighting the fuse they rescued a few names of rulers in Minas Tirith from the annals of the Third Age: King Telemnar (1636), King Telumehtar (1810), and Steward Belecthor II (2852).

8. Follies are beloved architectural oddities of British whimsey [photo].
What a fabulous folly you found. I would add that, in America, “Someone’s Folly” inevitably evokes the famous Seward’s Folly, i.e. Secretary of State William’s Seward’s purchase of the apparently useless territory of Alaska from the Czar in the 1860s.

Note another insulting personal remark, hydrocephalic for the old king’s heir, Nabisco. Symptoms for the condition when untreated can include “gait instability, urinary incontinence, and dementia”. (Wikipedia)

A delicious detail is that, in this version, Minas Troney is built as a towering city on otherwise “flat land”. Remind anyone of a certain controversial cinematic setting?

9. Ah, the afflictions of the king: nephritis and 'phyllis.
Excellent catch! And it repeats the gag from earlier in the book about indeterminate names: “Either Arglebargle IV or someone else”. The image of a bride-and-groom statue at the top of seven-layered Minas Tirith is very hard to erase from memory.



10. I wonder if the authors visited Boca Raton, Florida during Spring Break.
Very likely. I completely missed this one; again, good catch.

11. Italian wedding cake [photo].
Perfect!

12. Considering the city's main products, what do you think a "yeo" is? Were they polished with the emery wheels?
It's funny, but I would have sworn that Tolkien mentions yeomen in Lord of the Rings. But I can’t find the word anywhere. Have I missed it? If not, then this gag just devolves into another poke at the generic medievalism of fantasy epics and touristy folk festivals: after all, neither I nor anyone I’ve ever asked has known just what the “yeo” means in yeoman – and I’m an old fan of ‘The Yeomen of the Guard’ and other likely Anglophilic examples of the word’s survival in modern times.

Oops: looking it up (finally), I find the etymology isn’t really clear. It could be descended from Old English iunge man, “young man”; however there has been a suggestion of an unattested Old Frisian cognate geaman, with gea- “province” implying “villager, a rustic”.

13. Dentists must have been Important People in the '60s.
I think we’ve discussed this before (probably about eight years ago). I have a vague memory that an earlier dentist joke in BotR led us to speculate that it was a trope for the writers, perhaps spoofing the fact that dentists were known for making very good money for doing a very uncharismatic job. They became the ironic symbol in this parody of the replacement of the warrior aristocracy of the old regime with the Nouveau Riches of medical technocrats in prosperous postwar America (see Alan Arkin’s dorky but rich dentist character sucked into a thrilling CIA adventure in the 1979 comic film The In-Laws). The discussion ended, I believe, with an epiphanic realization of the meaning of the giant shining white toothbrush on the original cover of Bored of the Rings!

14. This distribution of refuse begs the question: how would the residents of Minas Tirith handle their own waste?
I think I actually visited a castle in Europe where they pointed out the hole in a wall, with an inclined slide, where the nightsoil and food waste could be ejected from the keep. I’m not sure how that would work for an entire city the size of Minas Tirith, not to mention it having seven rather than one curtain walls. Possibly wagons were used to collect organic waste and carry it down the roadways to be delivered to the farms in the Pellenor during peacetime; and when under siege, carried down to the main wall and thrown out at the enemy?

A similar question comes up as to the city’s fresh water supply, I would imagine: how did the upper levels get water? Was there, luckily, a spring of sufficient flow in the sides of Mindolluin above the town that was channeled via aqueduct to the citadel, hundreds of feet above the surrounding lands? Certainly Tolkien doesn’t mention what I thought was a commonplace in medieval cities: a trough of waste water in the center of the roadways, running downhill to carry away liquid waste. Evidently the stench alone could drop a dragon at a hundred paces.

15. Try to draw an overhead view of Minas Troney.
Thanks, maybe later.

16. (And who recognizes the end of this chapter part's title?)
Yes, indeed, “Minas Troney In The Soup”. A very clever reference by our Harvard boys to Tolkien’s famous comment in his “On Fairy-stories” essay, recasting Dasent’s earlier warning, that his readers must be satisfied with “’the soup’ [by which] I mean the story as it is served up by the author or teller” in contrast to their asking about the “bones” (sources) from which the soup was boiled.

Thus here ‘Bored of the Rings’ asks us to laugh at its gags because they’re simply funny, without wasting time in actually analyzing them, sourcing them, or comparing them elaborately and with mock-academicism to the original book by Tolkien. Sound advice!



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Archive: All the TORn Reading Room Book Discussions (including the 1st BotR Discussion!) and Footerama: "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
Dr. Squire introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


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dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 5, 4:16am

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You are most welcome! [In reply to] Can't Post

"Here I am, trying to compose myself before leading the discussion of The Muster of Rohan next week - and you throw at me this curveball, turkey, whatever?!"

Yes, Bored of the Rings will show up at the most unexpected - and inconvenient - times! Laugh

I fixed your link to Shelley's The Moon. Not all who wander are lost, but that is a very depressing description of it! Actually, the very first Middle-earth sunrise was in the West, not East.

Did Tolkien ever read Beatrix Potter?

I'd always thought the crude oil referred to unrefined motor oil, but maybe it's a tongue-in-cheek reference to poor-quality vegetable oil, ground by the emery wheels, and used to polish the yeos. Come to think of it, a funnier gag would have been to spell yo-yo as yeo-yeo.

Yes, that is clever the way the symptoms of pellagra show up in the book. I seem to recall one to dermatitis, but so far haven't been able to find it.

Yep, it looks like squire found the source of "ferndock"!

*reads article on Yarkon River* It says only something about restoring its natural flow...had it been diverted to go upstream at one point? The Androscoggin flows into another river, so it's not affected by tides and flows only one way. The Chicago River, now: that's a different story!

"Fabled capital": did you know that Washington, D.C. was built on a swamp?

Really? Your dad worked for La Ma Belle! You'd probably have to remember the days of that monopoly to get the reference.

I didn't know about follies until I took an interest in old castles, and discovered them in my internet wanderings. Fascinating pieces of architecture!

Oh, good catch on the Kubla Khan reference! And the "decayed teeth" of the authors.

My son had me try to play Portal. I don't do well with fast-moving three-dimensional computer games. And now he's gotten tired of me quipping "The cake is a lie", serves him right! Laugh


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


sador
Half-elven


Feb 5, 7:28am

Post #7 of 12 (212 views)
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A smile in need is a smile indeed [In reply to] Can't Post

And a BotR discussion is always good for a hearty chuckle.


In Reply To

Yes, that is clever the way the symptoms of pellagra show up in the book. I seem to recall one to dermatitis, but so far haven't been able to find it.


I do not recall it either. Perhaps you are misremembering Bromosel's "They early bird gets hepatitis?"



In Reply To
*reads article on Yarkon River* It says only something about restoring its natural flow...had it been diverted to go upstream at one point?


Not quite. But for years, the only power_station Israel had was on its northern bank; and as the state's population grew rapidly, so did the power output - and water pollution... while water from the Yarkon sources was pumped for home use. So at some point, the wastewater stream overwhelmed the weakened current - and up to a distance of some ten minutes' walk from my grandmother's house, the river seemed to flow upstream.
When I was a kid, the National_Water_Carrier was already in use, and a second, larger power station was being built; but it took some time for the river to heal.



In Reply To
"Fabled capital": did you know that Washington, D.C. was built on a swamp?


Actually, I did know that; but was not thinking of that when I posted. Nice, err, catch!




In Reply To

Really? Your dad worked for La Ma Belle! You'd probably have to remember the days of that monopoly to get the reference.


I don't quite. My parents divorced, and we returned to Israel when I was five. For some reason, my mother insisted that I begin primary school in Israel - and using fourty-odd years' hindsight, I can safely say that we could have stayed on for a few more years, without me missing a thing.
On the other hand - that would have left me to the tender mercies of the Canadian education system under Trudeau père; so I don't quite blame her...

Thinking about things I don't understand


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 5, 5:27pm

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Indeed! [In reply to] Can't Post

Tolkien could probably give the etymology of the transformation from "yeo" to "yo".

And, of course, it explains why yeo-yeos are one of the city's primary products!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 5, 5:33pm

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Hah! [In reply to] Can't Post

As I told sador: my geeky son insisted I try playing Portal. I get quite confused with the motion of three-dimensional layouts on two-dimensional computer screens, but did manage about ten minutes of the game.

Have you tried playing it? By the way, thanks for the Portals!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 5, 5:44pm

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A BotR post is never late, [In reply to] Can't Post

it arrives precisely when it's least expected! I had actually hoped to post a couple weeks earlier, but was...delayed.

Will respond later, but - where on earth did you find that Aragorn/Arwen "wedding cake"? Or did you craft it yourself? It's hilarious!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 6, 3:54am

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Nearly five years... [In reply to] Can't Post

I must admit to being horrified when I realized how long it had been! Crazy

1. You're right about Tolkien use of "wont" being parody-worthy. I found something strange, though: a quick search of LotR shows that word used only seven times! It does seem like it was more.

2. The Warhol connection: would that be his (in)famous painting of a can of Cambell's chicken noodle soup, the stuff of lunches we all grew up on?

3. That pellagra reference would be an easy one to gloss over, I'd thought it was a brand name until plunking it into Google!

4. I knew you could puzzle out "ferndock"! I've found one instance of "Roll 'em, Ferndock" on the Lansing, Michigan kids' show with Al E. Katt, Pansy, and Mr. Mayor: it was shouted before cartoons were shown. And "rolling ferndocks" comes naturally from that

6. Ooh, "Westrons" would have been great! And how about "Eastrons"? They must not have wanted to take that gag too far.

Must go, left something on the Bunsen...


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"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 7, 1:09am

Post #12 of 12 (152 views)
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Continuing the folly [In reply to] Can't Post

8. Seward's Folly is always the first thing that comes to my mind, when I see that word. Just imagine if that land had NOT been purchased...

9. A cake expert could make an actual cake like that, with A&A on top! I bet some clever Tolkien fan-couple has already done it...yes, it looks like someone did:



12. I did a search, and you're right: "yeoman" or "yeomen" is mentioned nowhere in LotR! Yes, they were at the lowest level, socially, the grunt-workers.

13. I had originally thought that was a gleaming white back-scrubber on the cover, threatening to give the baddies a bath! It wasn't until discussions of the dentists that I'd realized my error. Very clever of the artist, who apparently was more knowledgeable about BotR than Barbara Remington was with LotR, but then Kenney & Beard may have specified how they wished the cover drawn.

14. The waste disposal and water delivery do present interesting problems for a city with this kind of design. I'd love to confront the Professor with this. So many fantasy novels never acknowledge the need to use the loo!

16. Great explanation for "in the soup"! I hadn't remembered Tolkien's analogy.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"

 
 

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