Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: Off Topic:
It's the one month before the solstice reading thread!

Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


May 21, 3:05pm

Post #1 of 13 (2502 views)
Shortcut
It's the one month before the solstice reading thread! Can't Post

In other words, summer is upon us---I say with a dubious look out my window at the dark, wet, morning.

I'm almost finished with the audiobook of Georgette Heyer's The Foundling, which I've enjoyed despite its blithe acceptance of traditional class differences in English society. Although, to be fair, the premise of the book---the young duke curious about what it's like to be a normal person---does cast a very slight wry look at class entitlements.

At 11 discs, the book is too long. Listening to it has been like trying to make a solid meal off a meringue. But it's been nice to snack on every now and then, and Heyer's writing is, as always, a lovely precise old-fashioned prose.

On paper I'm reading Broken Ground, a mystery by Val McDermid in her series about a cold-case police unit based in Edinburgh. I've enjoyed the way the story is set in parts of Scotland I'm very familiar with. There are actually three mysteries, a major one involving a body found in a peat bog in Wester Ross and two minor ones, and I'm trusting McDermid will not try to wrench them all into the same story at the end. I could have done without the office politics in the background, but I assume this sort of thing isn't uncommon in real life.

So what have you been reading?

Where now the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing?
Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing?
Where is the hand on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing?
Where is the spring and the harvest and the tall corn growing?
They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow;
The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow....


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


May 21, 11:58pm

Post #2 of 13 (2437 views)
Shortcut
The Red Queen by Philippa Gregory [In reply to] Can't Post

Not one of Philippa's better books, I think. Most of it takes place in the protagonist's head, with remarkably little dialogue between characters. I also found it a challenge to be inside the head of a woman who devoutly believes that God's will matches her own perfectly (which her third husband challenges her about, to my delight), but the plot certainly lays out the Cousins' War very clearly, from start to finish.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


CuriousG
Half-elven


May 22, 2:16pm

Post #3 of 13 (2417 views)
Shortcut
The Man of Legends by Kenneth Johnson [In reply to] Can't Post

As Amazon is always inventing new ways to try to reach people, I stumbled across an aspect of Amazon Prime which I never knew about: "Prime Reading." Very small selection of books, but anyway, you can read them for free via Kindle, so I'm trying the above book, a supernatural thriller.

It's been hard to get into because of the excessive description (for my taste). For example, an immortal man who jumps through time is riddled with bullets in one scene, and we're told the anatomical destination of every single bullet, and it doesn't matter, because they're all gone in the next time jump. Not just that, but everything else gets loads of description too, so I'm skimming now, looking for dialogue and other key points. It's a shame when authors over-write like this since I'm the type of reader who likes to read every word.

It's tempting to parody writing like that: "His large, lumbering feet made regular, masculine impressions on the cool, succulent, ever-growing green blades of trimmed grass, a green not unlike the shimmering green of fresh lettuce in the overstocked produce department of an elegant grocery store, or perhaps the optimistic green of a field of German parsley recently kissed by a morning's worth of dew, or yet again, the ominous green he ruefully remembered of his beloved great-aunt Violet's house slippers that moved in a frenzied blur as she bravely but futilely swatted the mischievous gray flies in the old, decrepit house whose rusted, pocked, twisted window screens had beckoning holes in them..."
>>> all that to say a guy was walking across the grass. Oh, yeah, and the grass was green, because it always is. Smile


Annael
Immortal


May 23, 2:04pm

Post #4 of 13 (2324 views)
Shortcut
Fragile Things by Neil Gaiman [In reply to] Can't Post

mostly horror stories; not my thing, but well-written.

I also read School for Psychics by K.C. Archer, which is not so well-written; it has all the elements, but she can't do justice to her own ideas. For instance, things happen that she makes too clear too early in the book, so that one wonders why nothing is done about them when it's so obvious there is a big problem. If she'd merely hinted - or come up with a reason why the incident is totally ignored - many aspects of her plot would have worked better.

I also made an attempt at a romance/thriller by Mary Blalock, but her characters behave so inconsistently I couldn't believe in them. Sigh. Finding authors who actually know the craft - or get an editor to help them - seems to becoming harder and harder.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around Ö The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967
my blog: https://jodybower.com/myths-archetypes-in-film/


CuriousG
Half-elven


May 23, 3:38pm

Post #5 of 13 (2314 views)
Shortcut
I second that [In reply to] Can't Post

It's my problem with my modern fiction. Characters behave too inconsistently to be believable. And authors add another layer of inauthenticity by going for the absurd, which seems stylish for some reason. So nuclear bombs can be raining down all around them, and a couple of lovers will argue about how much sugar to put in the coffee, making no reference to the bombs at all--isn't that clever and deep? If you don't get it, then you're just not an intellectual.

Fiction isn't supposed to be real in the literal sense, but it should feel like you've been swept into a story that feels real.


Elberbeth
Tol Eressea


May 24, 2:54pm

Post #6 of 13 (2209 views)
Shortcut
I think Margaret Beaufort isjust plain unlikeable.// [In reply to] Can't Post

 

"There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark."


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


May 24, 10:18pm

Post #7 of 13 (2195 views)
Shortcut
Fully agree. [In reply to] Can't Post

I think you'd have to have the patience of a saint to live with her and her certainty of righteousness.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Finding Frodo
Tol Eressea


May 25, 4:51am

Post #8 of 13 (2184 views)
Shortcut
The Library Book [In reply to] Can't Post

Boy, what a writer! I'm loving it.

Also reading, or possibly re-reading, Bill Bryson's "The Road to Little Dribbling". I'm halfway through and still can't figure out if I've read it before or not. Either way, it's enjoyable.

Dark, cold, and wet here too -- good for reading!

Where's Frodo?


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


May 28, 2:50pm

Post #9 of 13 (2087 views)
Shortcut
It's the end of May reading thread! [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm enjoying listening to Terry Pratchett's Unseen Academicals---Stephen Briggs, who reads Pratchett's books, is a brilliant narrator with an infinite number of voices. In this installment, the wizards at Unseen University discover that in order to keep a generous bequest they have to play a game of football, much to their confusion and consternation.

There's a sub-plot concerning Nutt, a well-educated goblin trying desperately to fit into Ankh-Morpork's society. Think of one of JRRT's orcs discussing philosophy. And there's another sub-plot concerning Juliet, a beautiful but not-so-bright kitchen wench who becomes a model for a new line of dwarf fashion.

As always, it's both funny and profound---often in the same passage!

On paper, I've just finished My American Revolution, which is subtitled A Modern Expedition Through History's Forgotten Battlegrounds. The author, Robert Sullivan, is a New Yorker who sets out to explore many of the Revolutionary battlegrounds that are now obscured by modern development in New York and New Jersey. While his adventures are a bit meandering, still he presents them well and I've learned a lot about the history of that area.

So what have you been reading?

Where now the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing?
Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing?
Where is the hand on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing?
Where is the spring and the harvest and the tall corn growing?
They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow;
The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow....


Aragorn the Elfstone
Tol Eressea


May 28, 6:26pm

Post #10 of 13 (2083 views)
Shortcut
Finally been reading Beren and Lķthien... [In reply to] Can't Post

...and it may end up acting as a gateway to me finally getting into Christopherís HoME books. Iíve been enjoying the book immensely, and itís so interesting to see how the tale evolved over the years. The sections of the book pulled from the Lay of Leithian have been my favorite. As soon as I discovered that these were only extracts (and not all of the Lay that Tolkien wrote), I immediately ordered The Lays of Beleriand (which will be arriving tomorrow).

Happily, I already own both volumes of the Book of Lost Tales (I just have never read them before).

"The danger with any movie that does as well as this one does is that the amount of money it's making and the number of awards that it's got becomes almost more important than the movie itself in people's minds. I look at that as, in a sense, being very much like the Ring, and its effect on people. You know, you can kind of forget what we were doing, if you get too wrapped up in that." - Viggo Mortensen


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


May 28, 7:10pm

Post #11 of 13 (2081 views)
Shortcut
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm about half-way through and I have a lot of respect for how the author has managed to weave three storylines into a cohesive tale. As well as telling how the cancer cells from Henrietta went from being the first 'immortal' human cells to be cultured in a lab through to their being the basis of a great many medical breakthroughs, Rebecca Skloot also writes about Henrietta's life and that of her family, and the changing ethics of medicine through the decades.

It's a remarkable achievement and a heck of a story.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


cats16
Valinor


May 29, 3:59am

Post #12 of 13 (2071 views)
Shortcut
I saw Pratchett's name on Twitter today [In reply to] Can't Post

It was a screenshot of an interview he conducted with Bill Gates over 20 years ago regarding the digital future. I don't trust my phone to create a proper link, but the tweet in reference came up as the first search result on Google if you search both of their names together. Wish I could track down the full article, thought it may not be findable online (fitting! Smile)

Edit: And I should add the fact that his name may very well have been in journalists' minds due to the premiere of Amazon's Good Omens TV series in LA tonight.

Join us every weekend in the Hobbit movie forum for this week's CHOW (Chapter of the Week) discussion!




(This post was edited by cats16 on May 29, 4:00am)


Annael
Immortal


Jun 2, 5:55pm

Post #13 of 13 (1907 views)
Shortcut
so well-written [In reply to] Can't Post

I was riveted throughout.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around Ö The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967
my blog: https://jodybower.com/myths-archetypes-in-film/

 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.