Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Middle-earth TV Series Discussion:
One year later - not much - you?
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

MoreMorgoth
Bree

Nov 13, 12:42pm

Post #1 of 36 (2329 views)
Shortcut
One year later - not much - you? Can't Post

It has been a year now and what we know about this series is precious little. I cannot tell you how completely underwhelmed I am about what has dribbled out in that time.

How do others feel about this lack of any really substantive news?

Does this lack of developments throw the timeline of getting the material on the air in jeopardy?


Dunadan of North Arnor
The Shire

Nov 13, 1:59pm

Post #2 of 36 (2243 views)
Shortcut
Give the showrunners a chance to actually read the books :) // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Nov 13, 2:32pm

Post #3 of 36 (2236 views)
Shortcut
Did anyone attend the panels at Los Angeles Comic Con? [In reply to] Can't Post

TORN-sister Kelvarhin seems to have been there, but she's been laid up with a bad case of the flu and still seems to be trying to get caught up. Surely someone else made it to the panel "Dispatches from Middle-earth: New Tolkien projects on the Horizon" and took some notes?

That's not to say I wouldn't appreciate some impressions of the other panel ("I am no Man: The Women of Middle-earth") as well.

"For a brief time I was here; and for a brief time I mattered." - Harlan Ellison

(This post was edited by Otaku-sempai on Nov 13, 2:33pm)


Thor 'n' Oakenshield
Lorien

Nov 13, 3:07pm

Post #4 of 36 (2222 views)
Shortcut
Growing very impatient myself. I'm not good at waiting. [In reply to] Can't Post

 

"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord."


Silmaril
Rohan


Nov 13, 3:53pm

Post #5 of 36 (2220 views)
Shortcut
Tolkien Estate: final approval over casting, storylines and scripts [In reply to] Can't Post

Jackson also revealed that Amazon had asked him about possibly being involved in upcoming The Lord of the Rings TV series, which they plan to be "set in the same world" as the movies. But while happy to share his designs and have a look at their scripts, he ruled out further involvement because of the Tolkien estate's insistence on final approval over casting, storylines and scripts. "It would be impossible for me to [direct] without that control," he said.

Source



(This post was edited by Silmaril on Nov 13, 3:55pm)


Dunadan of North Arnor
The Shire

Nov 13, 4:18pm

Post #6 of 36 (2200 views)
Shortcut
Good! // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Belegdir
Lorien


Nov 13, 4:41pm

Post #7 of 36 (2200 views)
Shortcut
A year isn't that much time for a series of this magnitude [In reply to] Can't Post

I'd be surprised if we saw anything substantial for at least another year, and then at least two more years before anything is aired.
This is a problem with the internet. You have access to minor details that may lead to nothing. Not like in the past when all we really had to go on was what was published in the Radio Times.


MoreMorgoth
Bree

Nov 13, 10:08pm

Post #8 of 36 (2162 views)
Shortcut
Estate approval [In reply to] Can't Post

Exactly what does anyone at the Tolkien Estate know about film casting or scripts or anything else as to what makes a good film or TV series?

I can see them having input into content and being expert advisers on Middle-earth, but this part seems a deal that only handicaps artistic folks who know more about that end of the business than they do.


Thor 'n' Oakenshield
Lorien

Nov 13, 10:43pm

Post #9 of 36 (2153 views)
Shortcut
It'll be the closest thing we ever get to a "Tolkien-approved" LotR [In reply to] Can't Post

So I'm here for it. You don't have to have professional knowledge of film casting and scriptwriting, I don't think. The film industry has always been biased against amateurs. Look, I wrote a pretty good 6-film screenplay for LotR (if I do say so myself). What I'm really interested to find out is whether Priscilla Tolkien is involved in the project; Christopher's not, but I haven't heard anything of Priscilla. If she is involved, that would make me incredibly happy and make me a lot more faithful in what Amazon is doing.

"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord."


MoreMorgoth
Bree

Nov 13, 10:55pm

Post #10 of 36 (2146 views)
Shortcut
reaction [In reply to] Can't Post

Jackson has already said he will not be extensively involved due to the Estate oversight into areas outside of their expertise. That is NOT a good thing although I imagine it is music to the Jackson hater ears.

If Jackson feels this way - I suspect lots of other creative people in the film industry will respond much the same way.

I still think Hemingway was correct about the way to sell a book to the film industry.

“Drive to the border of California, throw your book over the fence. When they throw the money back over the fence, collect the money and drive home.”




(This post was edited by MoreMorgoth on Nov 13, 10:57pm)


Thor 'n' Oakenshield
Lorien

Nov 13, 11:03pm

Post #11 of 36 (2142 views)
Shortcut
I'm not a Jackson-hater [In reply to] Can't Post

So I'm not biased in that regard. I just want to see the Tolkiens finally involved in a movie project that is approved by the whole family, and I'm glad that this is at least close to that (though it's not to Christopher's liking, clearly).

"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord."


Eruonen
Valinor


Nov 13, 11:28pm

Post #12 of 36 (2133 views)
Shortcut
They don't want the integrity of the world being compromised with [In reply to] Can't Post

ridiculous or implausible plots and characters etc. All of us sit here and have ideas and can read scripts etc. and pick out some of the ill thought out events......Goblin Town Super Mario Brothers for example. I think The Hobbit movies ruined the Tolkien Estate trust. However, I do agree that working under such conditions as a producer/director/screenwriter would be difficult.


squire
Half-elven


Nov 14, 12:46am

Post #13 of 36 (2116 views)
Shortcut
Casting is one thing; scripts are another [In reply to] Can't Post

It's all very well to remind an author (or his representatives, in this case) that they know nothing about the realities of film-making. But it comes down to the author's conditions for granting the license to produce in the first place: if the author asks for script approval, and the production company agrees, both parties are obliged to negotiate the "realities" of a film project vs. the author's desire to have his work adapted in a reasonably faithful manner.

As most Tolkien fans know, there is a mordantly hilarious letter from the late 1950s in which Tolkien comments on the one draft of a film script for The Lord of the Rings that he ever read. As I read his comments, he did have an eye for what makes a good drama as opposed to a good read, and he accepted without question numerous adaptations and cuts to his book based on the necessities of the medium, while also chiding the screenwriter for numerous absurd, awful, or ignorant ideas for changing the story, the world, the characters, or the themes of his book.

I would even add that not every screenwriter is equally talented or imaginative in adapting a difficult property. The author may well be right, and the film producers wrong, in matters that can only ultimately be judged if and when a film actually reaches an audience.

"We had to change the book in [this way] because we know what makes a good TV series, and you don't" is not at all a closed statement. Its validity is based both on the terms of the agree-upon contract regarding script approval, and on the relative wisdom and taste of the screenwriters and the authors' representative.

I would sympathize with the Estate more in this regard - having heard numerous fans express their wishes that the series basically invent whatever seems cool as a generic fantasy adventure, and then simply apply names and places from Tolkien's Middle-earth - that is, if I didn't think that the Estate brought this hell upon themselves by selling the deal in the first place to let someone write an entirely new prequel to LotR aimed at the films-first Jackson audience.



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Archive: All the TORn Reading Room Book Discussions (including the 1st BotR Discussion!) and Footerama: "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
Dr. Squire introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


= Forum has no new posts. Forum needs no new posts.


Thor 'n' Oakenshield
Lorien

Nov 14, 1:47am

Post #14 of 36 (2105 views)
Shortcut
Haha, yes, I think we can agree on this, squire [In reply to] Can't Post

In this case, yes, I think you're right. And I know very well, I've already firmly decided, that when I publish my own novels, I will demand plenty of leverage with regard to the film rights. No author wants to see his or her vision tampered with, and the author or those close to him/her (in this case, Tolkien's children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren) probably know or at least understand the author's original intent better than some random filmmaker, scriptwriter, casting director, etc. Not always, but I'll guess that it's often the case. (Not always, though – I'm remembering the sad disaster that was L. Frank Baum's grandson, who decided to write his own Wizard of Oz novel).

Btw, I love reading that letter from the 1950s, and I've often wondered if it's possible to find the full letter anywhere? The letter as printed in Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien is very fun to read, but I can't help but notice how many of Tolkien's notes were skipped over during the abridgement. Is that the only copy, the one printed there? I've always wanted to see the full thing, so that while writing my own screenplays for Lord of the Rings, I might not make too many mistakes. I still crack up at the "ridiculously long sandwiches". Like, why??? Laugh

"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord."

(This post was edited by Thor 'n' Oakenshield on Nov 14, 1:48am)


Silmaril
Rohan


Nov 14, 7:24am

Post #15 of 36 (2073 views)
Shortcut
I'm not a PJ hater too [In reply to] Can't Post

I love what PJ did with LOTR, but I really dislike a lot of The Hobbit trilogy. That's why I think that these are good news.


Welsh hero
Gondor


Nov 14, 11:18am

Post #16 of 36 (2044 views)
Shortcut
Just wait, these things take time [In reply to] Can't Post

And would rather they take time to get it right than hurry out a rushed production.

-Irfon

Twitter: @IrfonPennant
middle earth timeline FB: https://www.facebook.com/MiddleEarth1


Fereth
Rivendell


Nov 14, 9:42pm

Post #17 of 36 (1960 views)
Shortcut
As far script and storylines go I guess it's subjective. [In reply to] Can't Post

But I thought PJ's casting at least for both trilogies was spot-on.

Wonder what casting choices they had a problem with.


Thor 'n' Oakenshield
Lorien

Nov 14, 10:46pm

Post #18 of 36 (1950 views)
Shortcut
I would agree [In reply to] Can't Post

I thought the casting for both trilogies was great. Elijah Wood is the perfect Frodo, and Martin Freeman the perfect Bilbo, and I can't imagine anyone else in those roles. Cate Blanchett, Ian McKellen, Sean Bean, Viggo Mortensen, Richard Armitage, Christopher Lee, they're all so good. The only ones I might have a problem with are…hmm, it's so hard. I'm not exactly fond of John Rhys-Davies - I imagine Gimli a bit different, but that's just me. Some of the Dwarves in The Hobbit seemed a bit random (Ori, in particular, and maybe Bifur, but I didn't really have problems with their casting, just their looks). Maybe Liv Tyler - though again, I love her as Arwen so much I could never say she was miscast.

"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord."


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Nov 15, 12:50am

Post #19 of 36 (1935 views)
Shortcut
Hobbit Casting [In reply to] Can't Post

If I really wanted to be picky, Billy Boyd was perhaps a bit too old to play Peregrin Took who was supposed to have been the youngest among Frodo and his hobbit companions.

"For a brief time I was here; and for a brief time I mattered." - Harlan Ellison


Farficom
Rivendell


Nov 15, 1:38am

Post #20 of 36 (1926 views)
Shortcut
On this weeks TORN Tuesday... [In reply to] Can't Post

Cliff said at the end of the show that Royd Tolkien will be on next week, and I'm hoping along with info on his own project(s) he will have something to share about what is going on with Amazon. Any little bit of info would be welcome.


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Nov 15, 3:30pm

Post #21 of 36 (1840 views)
Shortcut
TORn Tuesday: Viggo's Tips for Young Aragorn! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Cliff said at the end of the show that Royd Tolkien will be on next week, and I'm hoping along with info on his own project(s) he will have something to share about what is going on with Amazon. Any little bit of info would be welcome.


Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIi03IDnNhk

"For a brief time I was here; and for a brief time I mattered." - Harlan Ellison


uncle Iorlas
Rivendell


Nov 16, 5:11am

Post #22 of 36 (1741 views)
Shortcut
I don't hate Peter Jackson [In reply to] Can't Post

Hate the sin, love the sinner.


In Reply To
So I'm not biased in that regard.

I'm also not biased.


Voronwë_the_Faithful
Valinor

Nov 18, 7:09pm

Post #23 of 36 (1413 views)
Shortcut
And Elijah Wood was too young [In reply to] Can't Post

I know the argument is that even though he was 50 years old he retained the appearance of a young Hobbit who had just came of age at 33, and that a 33-year-old Hobbit is arguably equivalent to a 21-year-old human, but the 18-year-old (at the time of filming) Elijah definitely plays the role of Frodo very differently than in the book, in which Frodo is by far the elder of the four hobbits.

For the most part, however, I thought the portrayal worked okay.

'But very bright were the stars upon the margin of the world, when at times the clouds about the West were drawn aside.'

The Hall of Fire


Thor 'n' Oakenshield
Lorien

Nov 18, 10:44pm

Post #24 of 36 (1384 views)
Shortcut
Maybe in your opinion [In reply to] Can't Post

But in mine, Elijah Wood perfectly captured Frodo's other-worldliness, the fragility of a pure and perfect soul tormented, shattered, utterly ruined, and finally given rest and healing. There is not a thing in his performance that I can point to and say: "that's wrong", because when I first read the Lord of the Rings aloud to my sister, Frodo was just like that, and to see that onscreen then was like seeing something that you thought only existed in your head, placed in a movie. It was just wonderful. I cry when I watch the movie because it's so nostalgic for me, to see the Frodo I've always known onscreen.

"Torment in the dark was the danger that I feared, and it did not hold me back. But I would not have come, had I known the danger of light and joy. Now I have taken my worst wound in this parting, even if I were to go this night straight to the Dark Lord."


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Nov 19, 1:13pm

Post #25 of 36 (1282 views)
Shortcut
Frodo is younger in the films. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I know the argument is that even though he was 50 years old he retained the appearance of a young Hobbit who had just came of age at 33, and that a 33-year-old Hobbit is arguably equivalent to a 21-year-old human, but the 18-year-old (at the time of filming) Elijah definitely plays the role of Frodo very differently than in the book, in which Frodo is by far the elder of the four hobbits.


Elijah Wood works in the films, though, because Frodo is supposed to have reached his age of majority (at 33) on the same day as Bilbo's farewell party. The time leading up to his own departure from the Shire is greatly compressed so that Frodo is no more than a year older and no where near 50. Admittedly, it still seems strange for Frodo to seem younger than even Pippin.

"For a brief time I was here; and for a brief time I mattered." - Harlan Ellison

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.