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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Movie Discussion: The Lord of the Rings:
Is The Hobbit darker and more tragic than LOTR?

OhioDude72
The Shire

May 3, 2:33pm

Post #1 of 5 (1439 views)
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Is The Hobbit darker and more tragic than LOTR? Can't Post

Having watched both trilogies several times, and while the scope of LOTR is slightly bigger The Hobbit seems darker and more tragic. A small band of rag tag warriors makes one last stand for their stolen homeland, and ultimately fails. It really plays out like a classic Shakespearean tragedy, nobody wins. If you look at it closely it's actually pretty heartbreaking.


Darkstone
Immortal


May 3, 3:42pm

Post #2 of 5 (1429 views)
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Yes [In reply to] Can't Post

To me.

I've always found Bilbo's transition from childlike fat happy carefree hobbit to morally conflicted forcibly matured adventurer to be very very sad. (It's kinda like how innocent teenagers used to be drafted by the military and sent off to war, returning feeling old and haunted by nightmares.)

In contrast Frodo actually wanted to go adventuring, so to a certain extent he kinda sorta knew what he was getting into, as did the Dwarves of The Hobbit.

******************************************
“Did you say 'You Shall Not Pass' or 'You Shall Not Sass'?" asked the Balrog.

"I said 'You Shall Not Pass,'” replied Gandalf; "and I wish you wouldn't keep appearing and vanishing so suddenly: you make one quite giddy."

"All right," said the Balrog; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of its wings, and ending with its shadow, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone.

'Well! I've often seen wings without a Balrog,' thought Gandalf; `but a Balrog without wings! It's the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!’

-The Adventures of Gandalf in Middle-earth Land




OhioDude72
The Shire

May 3, 4:26pm

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Exactly [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
To me.

I've always found Bilbo's transition from childlike fat happy carefree hobbit to morally conflicted forcibly matured adventurer to be very very sad. (It's kinda like how innocent teenagers used to be drafted by the military and sent off to war, returning feeling old and haunted by nightmares.)

In contrast Frodo actually wanted to go adventuring, so to a certain extent he kinda sorta knew what he was getting into, as did the Dwarves of The Hobbit.


Being Tolkien's first tale, it might be the most honest reflection of his experiences in World War I.


Lindele
Gondor

May 3, 4:51pm

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Interesting [In reply to] Can't Post

I would say it is quite the opposite, especially from the movie point of view. Bilbo had a desire to adventure, while Frodo was literally completely thrown into it by Bilbo, having no desire to leave the Shire.

I think Bilbo's journey is dark and tragic, but nothing compared to what Frodo goes through. I think Frodo's journey is often underappreciated.


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


May 3, 9:24pm

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Nobody wins? [In reply to] Can't Post

Smaug is slain. Erebor is regained (though Thorin does not live to see it happen). Most of the Dwarves of the company survive to gain wealth and glory. Balin in later years becomes King of Moria (which ends in tragedy, but that is another story). Dáin becomes King under the Mountain. Bard is set up to become the King of Dale (with Bain as his successor). Bilbo gets his adventure and gains enough to set him up for the rest of his life (if only from the Troll hoard in the movies). Gandalf and the White Council are successful in driving the Necromancer out of Mirkwood. Alliances are formed or reforged among the Free People of the North.Yes, there is tragedy, but to say that nobody wins is far, far from the truth! Laugh

On the other hand, The Lord of the Rings is about the end of an era. Magic is fading; the Elves must either fade with it or leave the world. Much is lost that can never be regained. Many thousands of people die or suffer gravely, including important characters of the story. Frodo saves the Shire, but can never fully reconnect with it again. This is balanced by the renewal of the two kingdoms of the Dúnedain, the defeat of Sauron, Sam marrying Rosie and starting a family, and many other things; but LotR is still a very dark story at times.

"I may be on the side of the angels, but do not think for one second that I am one of them." - Sherlock

(This post was edited by Otaku-sempai on May 3, 9:36pm)

 
 

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