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It's the post-April-Fool's reading thread!

Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Apr 3, 2:44pm

Post #1 of 14 (968 views)
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It's the post-April-Fool's reading thread! Can't Post

Many thanks to the admins for their positively inspired April Fool's joke. Really, y'all surpass yourselves Tongue

I allowed myself to read another of the Ben Aaronovitch Peter Grant mystery/fantasy novels. I love these so much I'm rationing them out. This was Broken Homes, and was as delightful as the previous installments if slightly different in pacing. Me, I enjoy Peter's asides on architecture---which were very much relevant to the plot in this book---and the way the magic works in his world is fascinating. But not everyone may agree that this installment is enjoyably denser and chewier in those aspects.

I'm also reading a non-fiction book by Damien Enright titled The Kindness of Place: Twenty Years in West Cork, which I picked up several years ago in, well, West Cork. It's a very calming exploration of plants, landscape, society, domestic architecture, and so forth throughout the passing of the months. It's making me want to rush back to Ireland and just sit by the sea for a while.

I'm still not quite halfway through the audiobook of Little Women and am still enjoying it. I know I read it several times in my distant youth, but have forgotten many of the details. It's funny, though, how a scene or even a phrase will suddenly spark my memory.

So what have you been reading?

Where now the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing?
Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing?
Where is the hand on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing?
Where is the spring and the harvest and the tall corn growing?
They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow;
The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow....


Carcharoth
Rivendell


Apr 3, 3:25pm

Post #2 of 14 (906 views)
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Still reading FotR [In reply to] Can't Post

And I suspect I'll be at it for a long while; I keep getting distracted.
This morning, for instance, I've been poring over maps of Middle-earth and The Undying Lands since I've been wanting to get a nice [somewhat largish] wall map.



Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Apr 3, 4:32pm

Post #3 of 14 (897 views)
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Middle-earth Wall Maps [In reply to] Can't Post

Unfortunately I am not aware of any nice large-scale maps of Arda in either the First or Second Age.

Here is an illustration by Karen Wynn Fonstad, based on a drawing by Tolkien of Arda during the First Age (larger image here):



And here is how Middle-earth was imagined for Iron Crown's Middle-earth Role Play rpg in the 1980s (this was released as a poster map):



"I may be on the side of the angels, but do not think for one second that I am one of them." - Sherlock

(This post was edited by Otaku-sempai on Apr 3, 4:42pm)


Annael
Half-elven


Apr 3, 4:40pm

Post #4 of 14 (886 views)
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finally [In reply to] Can't Post

finished researching & writing a lecture on the Jungian concepts of anima & animus, which involved a LOT of reading, too many books to list, although I found Ann Belford Ulanov and James Hillman particularly helpful. Also spent quite a bit of time online looking up what the differently gendered have to say, which was interesting. This may become an article.

Also read "The Bear and the Nightingale" by Katherine Arden, the first in the "Winterknight" trilogy. It's based on Russian folk tales, which I love. Reads rather like a YA novel, but then the author is quite young herself; I would have liked a bit more depth. Still, it was well written and I will read the rest of the trilogy.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Petty Dwarf
Bree


Apr 3, 6:28pm

Post #5 of 14 (873 views)
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April Fools' prank nearly gave me a hernia. [In reply to] Can't Post

Still, I can laugh at how I was so thoroughly taken in, and now I'll be prepared for next year. I have finished FotR and am now on to TTT. No other serious reading going on right now.

"No words were laid on stream or stone
When Durin woke and walked alone."


Attalus
Lorien


Apr 4, 5:33pm

Post #6 of 14 (746 views)
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I am reading... [In reply to] Can't Post

Elizabeth Moon's Command decision and enjoying it immensely. Just acquired as a gift Charles Knight: The Artist Who Saw Through Time. Looks interesting.

We are the fighting Uruk-Hai! We slew the great warrior! Well, yeah, first he killed a bunch of us and another whole lot of Mauhr's lads, and we had to shoot enough arrows into him to drop a Mmak. But we got him!


Kelly of Water's Edge
Rohan

Apr 4, 11:05pm

Post #7 of 14 (675 views)
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I have the Charles Knight [In reply to] Can't Post

Very nice overview of his work. Some of his paintings are here in New York at the AMNH in the Dinosaur Halls. They're small, unlike the apparently larger works (from what I've seen in pictures) at the Field in Chicago, although I haven't gotten out there yet to see in person.

I've also seen Rudolph Zallinger's stunning Age of Reptiles mural at the Yale-Peabody, which is in striking distance. I don't know how old you are, but it was the quintessential dinosaur image for those of us who were children in the 70's. No longer scientifically accurate, but still mightily impressive to look at.

I'm now looking through James Kuether's The Amazing World of Dinosaurs. It's a nice collection of computerized paleoart covering the Mesozioc pretty comprehensively.


Attalus
Lorien


Apr 5, 1:14am

Post #8 of 14 (664 views)
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Heh! [In reply to] Can't Post

I am old enough to remember when Brontosaurus was a thing :)

We are the fighting Uruk-Hai! We slew the great warrior! Well, yeah, first he killed a bunch of us and another whole lot of Mauhr's lads, and we had to shoot enough arrows into him to drop a Mmak. But we got him!


Kelly of Water's Edge
Rohan

Apr 5, 2:14am

Post #9 of 14 (654 views)
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I've got another blast from the past for you. [In reply to] Can't Post

How about when Edmontosaurus/Anatotitan used to be Trachodon?

The two in the Charles Knight painting, which depicts the two now-Anatotitan skeletons at the AMNH, were my favorites growing up. Their names seem to change every decade or so, and I'm getting dizzy trying to keep up. :-)

Things are changing fast in palaeontology nowadays compared to when we were younger, aren't they?


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Apr 5, 5:18pm

Post #10 of 14 (615 views)
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The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been checking out the kindle books from my library and listening to them as I commute.

My dad recommended this series to me a while back, but I just now started on them. They take place in Botswana. The main character is a "traditionally-built African lady" who starts up her agency after leaving her abusive husband. Her father leaves her his large cattle herd and she sells to rent space for her business.

I like that the mysteries she solves are not murders but more benign day-to-day mysteries like missing persons and shady businesses. She also has a lot to say about life along the way. She's such a likeable character, kind and smart and capable but still full of the doubts that plague us all.

I knew nothing about Botswana before beginning this, so it's nice to learn something about this successful and progressive African nation.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
GNU Terry Pratchett
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



cats16
Valinor


Apr 6, 7:39am

Post #11 of 14 (571 views)
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About 2/3 of the way through Middle C [In reply to] Can't Post

by William Gass. Quite simple yet profusely complex. Dark, funny and undeniably odd.

Join us every weekend in the Hobbit movie forum for this week's CHOW (Chapter of the Week) discussion!




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Apr 10, 3:06pm

Post #12 of 14 (500 views)
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It's another reading thread! [In reply to] Can't Post

I could say something about it being the time of the year those of us in the US have to file our taxes, but I'd hate to use that as a subject heading Tongue

I'm now well past the halfway point of Little Women. The story has leaped ahead three years, to the part where Meg marries and has her children, and Jo and Amy are developing their talents. The gender assumptions, especially about Meg, make me roll my eyes a bit, but I'm sure that when the book was written, just having it center on several female characters was a bit bold.

On paper I'm reading a historical novel (that is, written today, unlike Little Women, which was contemporary at the time it was written), The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson. I'd read her Major Pettigrew's Last Stand a couple of years ago and enjoyed it, but this is a very different sort of book, not least because Pettigrew took place in today's diverse UK but Summer is set in 1914.

The main character is Beatrice Nash, a young woman who's taken up the position as schoolmistress in the town of Rye just as the WWI begins. Simonson presents Beatrice's frustration about the restrictions placed on women without making her seem anachronistic. However, Simonson also spends a lot of time, a la Austen or Trollope, presenting the social/class frictions and aspirations of the town. This is entertaining to a certain extent, but there is, in my opinion, too much well-rounded dialog with the characters concealing their ulterior motives and feelings, as though Simonson simply loves the sound of her own voice.

There's not much of a plot, just the way the war affects all aspects of the characters' lives, but I'm still reading. Good writing will carry me through a certain amount of dither.

So what have you been reading?

Where now the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing?
Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing?
Where is the hand on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing?
Where is the spring and the harvest and the tall corn growing?
They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow;
The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow....


Carcharoth
Rivendell


Apr 10, 3:58pm

Post #13 of 14 (496 views)
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Out of the Shire and into the Lone-lands. [In reply to] Can't Post

After a slow start to my current FotR re-read, I finally made it out of the Shire this past weekend; just finished "A Knife in the Dark."
Oy, this might take me as long as the actual Quest...



entmaiden
Forum Admin / Moderator


Apr 12, 2:06pm

Post #14 of 14 (469 views)
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I'm in Rohan [In reply to] Can't Post

and Eomer has just met up with Aragorn, Legolas and Gimil.

 
 

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