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The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: Off Topic:
The Watching Thread: "This is what life looks like..."

Aragorn the Elfstone
Tol Eressea


Feb 24, 8:30am

Post #1 of 24 (769 views)
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The Watching Thread: "This is what life looks like..." Can't Post

This was kind of a slow week for me on the movie front, but I did take the time to rewatch "Logan". In this age of the MCU & DCEU's CGI-fueled extravaganzas, Logan was (and is) a complete and utter breath of fresh air. It really is a shame that we likely won't see its like again, now that Disney has bought 20th Century Fox. X-Men will join the MCU, and any thought of a mature take on the characters will fall to the wayside in favor of appealing to the masses. Unsure

Speaking of films that don't appeal to the masses, I'm heading out to see "Annihilation" tomorrow. Seems like another sci-fi film that will flounder at the box office (due in large part to Paramount giving the film over to Netflix overseas and refusing to decently promote it in the US), but probably become a cult classic if the reviews are anything to go by. Can't wait! Smile

Then on Sunday, I'm going to see the 4K restoration of "The Dark Crystal" on the big screen. I haven't seen the film in ages, so I'm glad to get to re-experience it in theaters. Going to be so much fun. Cool

What have you been watching?

"The danger with any movie that does as well as this one does is that the amount of money it's making and the number of awards that it's got becomes almost more important than the movie itself in people's minds. I look at that as, in a sense, being very much like the Ring, and its effect on people. You know, you can kind of forget what we were doing, if you get too wrapped up in that."
- Viggo Mortensen

(This post was edited by Aragorn the Elfstone on Feb 24, 8:32am)


Kelly of Water's Edge
Rohan

Feb 24, 1:08pm

Post #2 of 24 (680 views)
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Rewatching Gargoyles. [In reply to] Can't Post

A fantasy/cyberpunk animated series from the 90's, which I highly recommend if anyone hasn't seen it. I love it for several reasons:

The mature storylines. Mortality, gun safety and even fake news!, the topics addressed were before their time, particularly in an animated series.

Shakespeare fan heaven. Characters from Macbeth and A Midsummer Night's Dream are recurring, and there's a significant shout-out to Othello. We can only weep that Tempest characters would apparently have eventually appeared as well had the series continued. How I would have loved to have seen the show's take on Ariel!

The artwork. The use of color, light and shadow is amazing.

The voice cast. From lead Keith David through the other regulars and inspired choices for the recurring characters, there wasn't a weak link.

The truly multicultural human characters, starting with the human lead Elisa Maza, who's a woman of mixed Native American and African American heritage. Almost everyone is represented.

The only warning I might give is for those affected by 9/11. The showrunners naturally had no way of knowing that would happen, and since much of the series takes place in New York, the Towers appear often in the background and were a location in one episode. Although the series would almost definitely not have lasted for almost 20 years, I can imagine it would have addressed the incident beautifully. With the city practically having been a character itself, it almost would have had to. I can almost see an episode dealing with the reactions of Elisa, Matt and the Gargoyles.


Annael
Half-elven


Feb 24, 11:18pm

Post #3 of 24 (660 views)
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The Shape of Water and my usual TV suspects [In reply to] Can't Post

LOVED "The Shape of Water." Everyone in it was excellent, especially Doug Jones. I was reminded of "Amelie" by several things: the color palette, the shy heroine whose only friend is the misfit artist across the way, the accordion music, and just the general feeling.

Speaking of Doug Jones, I'm still hooked on "Star Trek: Discovery." This show just gets better each episode. How they are going to reconcile it with prior Star Trek canon I have no idea. Maybe they won't?

Still loving "The Magicians" too - never can predict it, except that Eliot and Margot will be awesome.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around … The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


squire
Half-elven


Feb 25, 12:07am

Post #4 of 24 (658 views)
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Trying to knock off all the Oscar Best Picture noms. [In reply to] Can't Post

It's Winter Break this past week, so teaching duties were lighter and I ran off to the movies day after day.

"Three Billboards Outside Ebbings, Missouri". Very, very powerful with a great ensemble cast and involved writing. Probably too quirky to get the prize, I think.

"Dunkirk". I wrote about this earlier. I think this is deeply flawed, with occasionally powerful scenes assembled chaotically. Yes, that echoes the chaos of battle, but this is a film, not a battle. Someone has to pull it together, but no one does.

"Get Out". I saw this months ago, as a fan of Key & Peele from way back when. This is my personal favorite to win, but I don't think it will. It's edgy and deeply perceptive about black-white relations in our society.

"Lady Bird". Beautifully acted and written, it's small-scale all the way: how life is a tissue of relationships and unspoken knowledge. I hated the ending, where she actually escapes her rural backwater life (her perception, noted) for NYC, and discovers it's not all what she wanted.

"Phantom Thread". Eerily weird period piece about haut-couture fashion design in postwar Britain: specifically, the life and loves of a tremendous artist of fashion and his relationship with one woman he discovers who is his perfect model. Like many of these films, I felt this was a vehicle for the lead actors rather than what I think of as 'best picture.'

"The Post". This is the model of what I think Hollywood wants 'best picture' to mean: a huge, historically and politically relevant, epic in a respected genre (the newspaper film), with superstar leads and world-class direction. And in truth, it's an excellent film: absorbing, exciting, intricate, and big. I know this is ironic, but this is really the only one of the candidates that meets the old criteria, and so I wonder if it will miss because it's too obvious that it shouldn't.

"Darkest Hour". This is the flip side of 'Dunkirk': what was going on in England at the time, and focusing on one solitary leader rather than the everyday soldiers en masse. Again, the amazing performance by the lead as Churchill seemed to me to suck the air out of the rest of the film. This seems like a shot for best actor, not best film.

"Call Me By Your Name". This is exotic and clicheed at the same time. The tradition of a lazy summer spent at a fabulous European chateau as a wealthy family works out its next moves is a classic of continental cinema. The innovation here is that the next moves are a budding gay relationship between two young men. I was intrigued until I realized I didn't much like either of them, and then I was frankly a bit bored as the scales fell from various eyes. It's oddly a 'foreign film' in the 'best picture' category, allowed because the majority of the dialogue is in English. I don't see this one winning. But you never know.

And tomorrow we're going to go see the final contender, "The Shape of Water", which I'm looking forward to.

This list is an odd one: three aspiring epics in the realms of politics and war, and seven quirky personal novellas in the realm of realism (except, perhaps, 'Get Out' which the director calls a 'social thriller'; and, I think, the last one which I haven't seen yet but understand is more fantastical).

Oscar being Oscar, each of them is technically excellent and guaranteed entertaining. What does 'best picture' mean, anyway? But one thing I've learned over the years, which is why I made the effort this year: unless you've seen them all, you're in over your head rooting for just the one you like.



squire online:
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Aragorn the Elfstone
Tol Eressea


Feb 25, 12:22am

Post #5 of 24 (642 views)
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I remember Gargoyles very fondly. [In reply to] Can't Post

Though I don't remember clearly how many episodes of the series proper I actually saw. But I do remember the opening multi-part episode particularly. I had a VHS copy of it, and watched it many times. I'd love to revisit the series sometime. Smile

"The danger with any movie that does as well as this one does is that the amount of money it's making and the number of awards that it's got becomes almost more important than the movie itself in people's minds. I look at that as, in a sense, being very much like the Ring, and its effect on people. You know, you can kind of forget what we were doing, if you get too wrapped up in that."
- Viggo Mortensen


Aragorn the Elfstone
Tol Eressea


Feb 25, 12:35am

Post #6 of 24 (650 views)
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"What does 'Best Picture' mean, anyway?" [In reply to] Can't Post

Nothing at all, really. Tongue


In Reply To
Oscar being Oscar, each of them is technically excellent and guaranteed entertaining. What does 'best picture' mean, anyway? But one thing I've learned over the years, which is why I made the effort this year: unless you've seen them all, you're in over your head rooting for just the one you like.


Truth be told, I find that you still just end up just rooting for the one you like. And more often that not, that comes to nothing for me. The unfortunate side effect of getting caught up in the Oscars hoopla is that once you've wrapped your head around the idea of it being a competition, then you start getting antagonistic toward the films that aren't your favorite (even the ones you otherwise really liked). I don't like that.

The entire notion of a "Best Picture" (or "Best" anything, really) is absurd anyway. Though I'm not entirely above getting roped into awards season hysteria (old habits die hard), Oscar "culture" (for lack of a better term) has lost its appeal for me more and more as each year has passed by.

"The danger with any movie that does as well as this one does is that the amount of money it's making and the number of awards that it's got becomes almost more important than the movie itself in people's minds. I look at that as, in a sense, being very much like the Ring, and its effect on people. You know, you can kind of forget what we were doing, if you get too wrapped up in that."
- Viggo Mortensen

(This post was edited by Aragorn the Elfstone on Feb 25, 12:35am)


Aragorn the Elfstone
Tol Eressea


Feb 25, 12:39am

Post #7 of 24 (644 views)
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Canon... [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Speaking of Doug Jones, I'm still hooked on "Star Trek: Discovery." This show just gets better each episode. How they are going to reconcile it with prior Star Trek canon I have no idea. Maybe they won't?


I don't remember exactly where I heard it, but I recall it being said that slavish devotion to continuity is the death of creativity (paraphrasing).

I used to get bent out of shape with regard to shows, movies, etc. getting the smallest of details wrong (in connection with prior installments), but I've gotten over that. I'd rather a writer, director, etc. go all in with the story they're telling than get wrapped up in lining everything up perfectly with what's come before.

"The danger with any movie that does as well as this one does is that the amount of money it's making and the number of awards that it's got becomes almost more important than the movie itself in people's minds. I look at that as, in a sense, being very much like the Ring, and its effect on people. You know, you can kind of forget what we were doing, if you get too wrapped up in that."
- Viggo Mortensen


Kelly of Water's Edge
Rohan

Feb 25, 3:58am

Post #8 of 24 (634 views)
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Do rewatch it! [In reply to] Can't Post

If the multi-part opening is your clearest memory, you're in for a treat. The abbreviated first season and the second season are on DVD. The third season, known as "The Goliath Chronicles", is not. It was made after creator Greg Weisman's rift with Disney and he doesn't consider it cannon. Most fans note a significant dip in quality in Chronicles, and the series would undoubtedly have lasted a few seasons longer had Weisman not departed and the vision he had mapped out come to fruition.

Also, if you're a Star Trek fan, you'll note a big connection. Jonathan Frakes (Riker) and Marina Sirtis (Troi) were regulars - Xanatos and Demona respectively. Apparently they must have enjoyed the experience and gotten others from the franchise on board. Recurring characters included Brent Spiner (Data) as Puck, Michael Dorn (Worf) as Goliath's brother Coldstone, who survived the massacre in a very different way than the others, Kate Mulgrew (Janeway) as Titania and Nichelle Nichols (Uhura) as Elisa's mother. Several others voiced one-off characters. Unfortunately, we can only speculate whether or not the show might have nabbed Patrick Stewart to voice Prospero had it lasted longer.


Aragorn the Elfstone
Tol Eressea


Feb 25, 7:48am

Post #9 of 24 (628 views)
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I remember that! :) [In reply to] Can't Post

One of the things that definitely stuck in my mind was that Star Trek TNG connection.

Thanks for the heads up on Season 3. I won't bother about missing out on it. I've got an Amazon gift card headed my way, and the DVD sets sound like a perfect way to spend it (the sets are only $10 each, so I'll only have to spend $5).

I pulled up a couple clips on YouTube this evening, and the memories came flooding back. Smile In retrospect, it's no surprise that I responded to the show. I love mythology, and the show was steeped in that stuff. While I may not have fully understood the importance of it as a kid, the complicated characters were undoubtedly a major pull as well. The show (based on my memory) seems like it was of a kind with Batman: The Animated Series, in that it didn't shy away from telling an adult story and respected its audience's intelligence.

"The danger with any movie that does as well as this one does is that the amount of money it's making and the number of awards that it's got becomes almost more important than the movie itself in people's minds. I look at that as, in a sense, being very much like the Ring, and its effect on people. You know, you can kind of forget what we were doing, if you get too wrapped up in that."
- Viggo Mortensen


Annael
Half-elven


Feb 25, 4:00pm

Post #10 of 24 (605 views)
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You'd like "Discovery" then [In reply to] Can't Post

if you're not already watching. They are committed!


Quote
I'd rather a writer, director, etc. go all in with the story they're telling than get wrapped up in lining everything up perfectly with what's come before.


I also love that there's no magic reset button.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around … The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Kilidoescartwheels
Tol Eressea


Feb 26, 11:04pm

Post #11 of 24 (573 views)
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Finally made it to "Black Panther" [In reply to] Can't Post

If you haven't seen it yet, you might give it a try. It's closer to "Civil War" in many respects, since much of the fighting is one-on-one, and there are some ideological issues involved in this movie. I was afraid that it might be too urban America, but surprisingly it did have a good African feel to it (or at least my idea of African, which I admit is based on white Hollywood's previous African-based films). And the very first thing in the film was a distinctly African problem of women & boys being kidnapped from villages & forced into marriage or being soldiers. Very contemporary, and I mean WOW! The acting was good all around, but I give big kudos to Michael B. Jordan for playing a killer that you could somewhat sympathize with. You know, I was pleased with Michael Keaton's performance in "Spiderman: Homecoming," and MBJ's character was a lot like that; well-developed with a backstory and motive instead of a one-dimensional villain whose only real purpose is to get defeated by the hero. So don't despair just yet, maybe Marvel has turned a corner on that.


Some of my friends went to see "Annihilation" yesterday, I think of it as "female Predator" but would be interested in what people think of it. And speaking of "Black Panther," I have a Netflix DVD with Chadwick Boseman playing Thurgood Marshall, called "Marshall" (big surprise). Yeah, I'm a history geek & actually like legal drama, so win-win. I'll watch that sometime this week, that's the plan anyway.

I'm not scared to be seen, I make no apologies - this is me!

from The Greatest Showman




Annael
Half-elven


Mar 2, 3:37pm

Post #12 of 24 (540 views)
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Black Panther [In reply to] Can't Post

I loved it. I was intrigued by the daring raising of the question "what would happen if those who have been oppressed all along get the power?" I think that's behind a lot of the fear we hear these days, and it's a legitimate question when one looks at the MIddle east . . . will things be just as bad or worse, only with the roles reversed, or will those who've been kept down be wiser than to just seek revenge, however justified?

The thing I loved the most was how T'Challa is surrounded by strong women of every description. To me the story evoked old Welsh stories of Gawain, the Knight of the Goddess who respects women's sovereignty and fights to uphold it. I even blogged about it. And what do you know, respecting women and letting them have a say turns out to the be answer to the first question.

I loved the visuals. I loved how the city felt like a small town and how the country kept its rural roots strong despite having fantastic technology, which as a city-bred person who prefers country life, I think is something we need to be paying much more attention to.

And yeah, Michael B. Jordan is great. My niece insists that I MUST see "Creed" which stars him & has the same director at "Black Panther."

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around … The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967

(This post was edited by Annael on Mar 2, 3:38pm)


imin
Valinor


Mar 2, 8:42pm

Post #13 of 24 (529 views)
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Black Panther [In reply to] Can't Post

Went to see Black Panther with friends after the hype this film has been receiving. Haven't been to the cinema in ages. It was dross. Complete dross.

So completely predictable and the whole story is one which made me think - who cares? The acting was fine, the CGI was over the top and over bearing, the big battle at the end was same old, same old.

Two of my friends wanted to leave before the end of the film but i asked them to stay - more out of principle of paying a fortune for my ticket than anything else.

Honestly the film was a massive disappointment but i haven't watched any of the newer marvel movies as i dislike most, other than guardians of the galaxy vol 1, so maybe it just was never going to be good to me as its probably not aimed at me, partner or my friends - though we are all late twenties early thirties and male, female, so i dunno.

To try and end on a positive im trying to think of something i liked about the film....erm.....the female general was decent, there you go! only good part is i went to bingo for first time ever and won my money back, haha.

Other programmes i watched - dont have tv but stayed in hotel due to weather and the room had a tv so watched a BBC Panorama programme on Harvey Weinstein which was very interesting in a shocking and saddening way. I hope in a way it isn't true, as its terrible someone could be such a creep but if it is true then i hope the victims get justice.

All posts are to be taken as my opinion.


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 2, 11:03pm

Post #14 of 24 (512 views)
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"How Rotten Tomatoes may have radically skewed the Oscars’ Best Picture race." [In reply to] Can't Post

"Finally", claims this article, "the Best Picture category feels like the most thorough gathering of the year’s best films."

Some interesting points are made there, particularly about how traditional Oscar-bait fare has been supplanted by more innovative works, but that sentence, with which the piece closes, is laughable. In almost every year, it is probable that at least a plurality of the best films are foreign language works, which almost never receive Best Picture nominations.

Treason doth neuer prosper? What's the Reason?
for if it prosper none dare call it treason.


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Annael
Half-elven


Mar 3, 4:19pm

Post #15 of 24 (486 views)
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I do wish [In reply to] Can't Post

Marvel could come up with another story line for their origin-story movies than "and then he has to fight the guy who has the same powers as him only more so." Except . . . I guess that's always going to happen with a hero story, innit. Heroes can't be heroes without villains, and if you have superpowers, the villain has to also, and if their powers are very different, then probably you're not the hero on tap for that.

So it comes down to how well the story is done.

I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the words begin to move around … The words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young.

-- Gaston Bachelard

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Otaku-sempai
Immortal


Mar 3, 7:29pm

Post #16 of 24 (474 views)
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The Rogues [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Marvel could come up with another story line for their origin-story movies than "and then he has to fight the guy who has the same powers as him only more so." Except . . . I guess that's always going to happen with a hero story, innit. Heroes can't be heroes without villains, and if you have superpowers, the villain has to also, and if their powers are very different, then probably you're not the hero on tap for that.


Actually, I've always felt that what makes the Flash's rogues gallery so much fun is its diversity in powers and abilities. Well, that and their slightly odd 'Silver-age' vibe.

"I may be on the side of the angels, but do not think for one second that I am one of them." - Sherlock

(This post was edited by Otaku-sempai on Mar 3, 7:31pm)


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 3, 8:09pm

Post #17 of 24 (473 views)
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John Hurt had been cast as Neville Chamberlain in "Darkest Hour" [In reply to] Can't Post

Hurt, perhaps best known in these parts for playing Aragorn in Ralph Bakshi's animated film of The Lord of the Rings, was already too sick from cancer when filming began. Ironically, in Darkest Hour, Chamberlain (played by Ronald Pickup) is dying of cancer.

(Interesting that the phrase "darkest hour" was used more than 80 times on TORN before the Churchill film was released, mostly because it's a DVD chapter title in one of the Hobbit movies.)

Treason doth neuer prosper? What's the Reason?
for if it prosper none dare call it treason.


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Discuss Tolkien's life and works in the Reading Room!
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squire
Half-elven


Mar 3, 10:08pm

Post #18 of 24 (468 views)
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I didn't think much of how Chamberlain was portrayed [In reply to] Can't Post

He and Lord Fairfax were simply villains, the near-treasonous bad guys compared to whom Churchill, for all his quaint flaws, was clearly preferable. I doubt Hurt could have done anything about that basic choice of the writers.

The only political character who could even stand up to Oldman's overwhelming performance was King George VI, played by Ben Mendelsohn. Churchill's wife, Clemmie (Kristin Scott Thomas) and the increasingly less intimidated secretary (Lily James) also just barely hold their own when he's on the screen.

When I think of John Hurt, I think of his amazing Winston Smith in 'Nineteen Eighty-four', more than I remember his voice performance in the Bakshi film. But as many noted on a TORn thread when he recently died, his career was marked by amazing versatility.



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Archive: All the TORn Reading Room Book Discussions (including the 1st BotR Discussion!) and Footerama: "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
Dr. Squire introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


= Forum has no new posts. Forum needs no new posts.


squire
Half-elven


Mar 3, 10:27pm

Post #19 of 24 (465 views)
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So, "The Shape of Water" makes ten. [In reply to] Can't Post

I did see this, finally, to complete my Oscar Best Picture collection, but also because it has of course received fabulous reviews. It's only my second or third Del Toro picture, but I liked it very much more than his more ostensibly 'fantastic' films (Hell Boy II, etc.).

My overall impression was of a director playing with Hollywood genres as if they were keys on a piano. Back and forth, in and out, switching seamlessly, the film is at times a Cold War thriller, a love story, a horror film, a heist film, a monster movie, 'Beauty and the Beast', and film noir. It's anchored by Sally Hawkins' understated but passionate performance, and spiced to a poisonous degree by Michael Shannon as the villain. The supporting characters are all excellent - within the constraints of genre, to be sure - and the monster (Del Toro's reliable Doug Jones) does as much with a rubber suit as any monster I've ever seen. This definitely joins the cadre of 'quirky, almost arty' small-scale films for Best Picture, compared to the big historical epics.

I'm still rooting for 'Get Out', but frankly this or, really, any of them could take the prize as far as I can tell. No turkeys here - only great films large and small. See you after tomorrow night!



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Archive: All the TORn Reading Room Book Discussions (including the 1st BotR Discussion!) and Footerama: "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
Dr. Squire introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


= Forum has no new posts. Forum needs no new posts.


sevilodorf
Grey Havens


Mar 3, 10:43pm

Post #20 of 24 (461 views)
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While not ready to go as far as you [In reply to] Can't Post

I also am not in the gee this is fantastic movie. It's good a solid B, on par if not a tiny bit better than the other Marvel Universe movies. There's hope for some of the characters becoming more that cardboard cutouts in the next movie.

Fourth Age Adventures at the Inn of the Burping Troll http://burpingtroll.com
Home of TheOneRing.net Best FanFic stories of 2005 and 2006 "The Last Grey Ship" and "Ashes, East Wind, Hope That Rises" by Erin Rua

(Found in Mathoms, LOTR Tales Untold)




(This post was edited by sevilodorf on Mar 3, 10:44pm)


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 4, 1:12am

Post #21 of 24 (448 views)
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"Britons never, never, never shall be slaves." [In reply to] Can't Post

I only just saw Darkest Hour last night. My reaction probably benefited from having recently read comments by a historian who found much to fault in the film's accuracy; thus steeled for a disaster, I found it to be rather better, although I agree with David Bratman's comment that the "need to paint Churchill as a hero and therefore Halifax (and Chamberlain) as villains infects everything. They were all of them flawed but honorable men doing the best they could". Another historian's review I just now read is pretty forgiving.

The only other of this year's nominees I've seen is Dunkirk, which obviously overlaps this one in content. One detail near the end of both films struck me. Before Churchill addresses the House of Commons with his famous "We shall fight on the beaches" speech (in Darkest Hour this is wrongly shown as having been broadcast on the radio; it wasn't), he speaks to his Outer Cabinet, whose response to his suggestion that the UK might have to seek terms with Germany prominently includes the cry, "never, never". Meanwhile, as Dunkirk concludes, the generally experimental score takes up the "Nimrod" movement of Edward Elgar's Enigma Variations (which Bratman, as it happens, has identified as very Tolkienian music)--and some musicologists have argued that the mystery theme upon which Elgar built the piece is the "never, never" line from "Rule, Brittania".

Treason doth neuer prosper? What's the Reason?
for if it prosper none dare call it treason.


-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
Discuss Tolkien's life and works in the Reading Room!
+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
How to find old Reading Room discussions.


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 4, 2:23am

Post #22 of 24 (452 views)
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Here's a "brutally honest" take from an Oscar voter. [In reply to] Can't Post

Apparently The Hollywood Reporter offers a few Academy voters the opportunity to rant anonymously every year. This actress saw every nominated film in every category, and has something to say about almost all of them. Her comments on Get Out have already received some understandable censure, but as a guide to understanding somewhat of the thinking of the Oscar electorate, it's a helpful piece. Her choice for best picture? The Shape of Water.

Treason doth neuer prosper? What's the Reason?
for if it prosper none dare call it treason.


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squire
Half-elven


Mar 4, 2:41am

Post #23 of 24 (446 views)
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Whoa [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, that's certainly helpful in understanding how the Oscars really work.

I noticed that the respondent used the phrase "Oscar-worthy" to eliminate films, but never defined it. That's understandable - we usually assume our own frameworks for understanding are universal - but here it brings out that the Academy's voters have a kind of standard they follow but don't or can't articulate.

I also thought her comment:
[del Toro] said, “I wrote a love story because I really think that if we love each other more, it will solve a lot of the problems in the world today.” I hadn’t thought about things that way and I liked that.
was pretty telling. Huh? You've never heard anyone else say that love can change the world? "All you need is love" (Beatles, 1960s)? Etc.? Think about art much, ever? Or just vote for Oscar because, work in the industry and know the players?



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sevilodorf
Grey Havens


Mar 4, 4:05am

Post #24 of 24 (439 views)
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So much of the thinking there [In reply to] Can't Post

Is not based on the actual movie but upon personal association with the actor, director or setting. Yes the voting is subjective but you should at least be basing it on the movie and not on how the actor presented himself at another event.

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