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The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: The Pollantir:
A bit morbid 'praps - but what's the best,
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Poll: A bit morbid 'praps - but what's the best,
John Hurt in “Alien”
Marlon Brando in “Apocalypse Now”
James Caan in “Godfather”
Robert Duvall in “Lonesome Dove”
Sean Bean in “Fellowship of the Ring”
Slim Pickens in “Dr. Strangelove”
Robert Shaw in “Jaws”
Janet Leigh in “Psycho”
Val Kilmer in “Tombstone”
Steve Buscemi in “Fargo”
Other?
View Results (29 votes)
 

Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 16, 5:17pm

Post #1 of 34 (5024 views)
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A bit morbid 'praps - but what's the best, Can't Post

or most moving, movie death scene. Pirate


Alassea Elensar
Rivendell


Feb 16, 8:42pm

Post #2 of 34 (4893 views)
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Darn :-( [In reply to] Can't Post

I put my vote in before I noticed the 'other' option. I should have chosen that, and then nominated James Caan in 'Brian's Song'. Man, I cried like a baby over that one. Unsure


Lissuin
Tol Eressea


Feb 16, 11:01pm

Post #3 of 34 (4868 views)
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#1 - Ruth in "Fried Green Tomatoes". [In reply to] Can't Post

Friendship, love, real life, gone quietly.
https://www.youtube.com/...ngLrgf2N8&t=107s

#2 - Roy in "Bladerunner". Tears in rain. Memories.

Thorin Oakenshield and his little friend were pretty darned good, too.

See, it's those last quiet moments I appreciate.

And now, BG, after all this sharing, I'm going back to my pot of tea, my re-re-read of "The Princess Bride" and then, I think, a quiet walk in the woods. (phew) But thanks for the reminder to remember. Evil

Salud!


Darkstone
Immortal


Feb 17, 3:16am

Post #4 of 34 (4846 views)
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Lucy Burrows in "Broken Blossoms" (1919) [In reply to] Can't Post

Horrific. Heartbreaking.


cats16
Valinor


Feb 17, 4:27am

Post #5 of 34 (4839 views)
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Renée Jeanne Falconetti in The Passion of Joan of Arc [In reply to] Can't Post

Her eyes still haunt me.

Honorable mention: Emmanuelle Rive in Amour. Slow yet emotionally gutting.


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 17, 4:58pm

Post #6 of 34 (4798 views)
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Looks like I’ve got company -- Who dat? [In reply to] Can't Post

I’ve chosen “Lonesome Dove” too.

Here’s two hardened (and middle-aged) Texas Rangers: Robert Duval (Capt. McRae) & Tommy Lee Jones (Capt. Call). They are constantly carping and digging at one another. But we know they love each other (platonically), and each would quickly give his life for the other. When we truly read between the lines we understand their relationship, and Jones’ reaction, at the death of Duval in Miles City is heartbreaking, and … gets my vote.


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 17, 5:03pm

Post #7 of 34 (4791 views)
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YES! Me too... :( [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I put my vote in before I noticed the 'other' option. I should have chosen that, and then nominated James Caan in 'Brian's Song'. Man, I cried like a baby over that one. Unsure



Attalus
Lorien


Feb 18, 1:25am

Post #8 of 34 (4736 views)
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Psychologically speaking... [In reply to] Can't Post

I have heard it theorized, and have also heard that Larry McMurtry agrees with this analysis, is that Call, Gus, and Jake Spoon were all parts of a healthy psyche. Call, of course, is the Superego, trying to direct right actions no matter what the cost. His third-person internal monologue on early rising has been repeated by me, equally internally, many times. Gus is the Ego, seeking pleasure (i.e., tension reduction) and avoiding pain, but unlike the id, the ego is concerned with devising a realistic strategy to obtain pleasure. The ego has no concept of right or wrong; something is good simply if it achieves its end of satisfying without causing harm to itself.

Jake Spoon, of course, is the Id, the primitive and instinctive component of personality. It consists of all the inherited (i.e., biological) components of personality present at birth, including the sex (life) instinct – Eros (which contains the libido), and the aggressive (death) instinct - Thanatos.

When Jake, the Id, is executed by the boys, it disturbs their connection to basic instincts. Neither Gus nor Call is able to form a stable relationship, though both Lorie and Clara are available. When Gus dies, it leaves Call, the Superego, a confused and disoriented man. Thus the critics, or at least some of them. I actually agree with most of that. So, I guess, though I love Gus' character, and Robert Duvall does a superb job playing him in the mini-series, I really don't regard it as a tragedy like Boromir/Sean's death.My 2 cents, anyway.

Pirate

edit: spelling


(This post was edited by Attalus on Feb 18, 1:28am)


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 18, 5:36pm

Post #9 of 34 (4683 views)
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The psych theory [In reply to] Can't Post

Thank you for this most interesting analysis. Yes it does make some philosophical sense. But up front I will stay with my choosing the moving death of Gus over the tragic death of Boromir, as we know Gus to a fair-thee-well upon his death, but Boromir is not nearly as developed a character. The actual shooting of the two scenes is so well done, yet as much as I love Tolkien the scene in Miles City never fails to bring a tear, as I see a much closer relationship between Call and Gus than perhaps the average person might detect, and Call’s reaction is so superb: “Aw, go ahead and die. What do I care.” And then the simple word “Augustus” with the hand softly on the forehead can’t fail to move.

But, I had never before thought of Call, McCrea, and Spoon as a trio. Spoon had been out doing his carousing for ten years when the show begins, whereas Gus & Call had never parted. Couldn’t we almost say that Deets might be the Id in your analysis, as he was a constant with the group? And it is quite clear that Call and Gus are and were of a higher status in the Rangers than Spoon. Spoon was a follower (the cause of his demise) whereas both Call and Gus were leaders.

As for the Superego and Ego I see these only loosely. Call spends his mornings bucking broncos or bossing the boys. Gus spends his mornings baking biscuits, reading the Bible, and then having a drink. Call spends his evenings sitting alone by the river cleaning his rifle. Gus spends his evenings drinking and telling tales to the boys. Who is really accomplishing anything of significance? But, yes, if we have to choose then Call is the Superego. But I contend that is so only because Gus allows it when it suits him: “You don’t boss me Woodrow. I’m the one man you don’t boss.” It’s quite clear that Gus (the ego) considers himself equal to Call (the superego) but is happy to play second fiddle quite often, as his ego is not wounded in doing so. A sign of self-assurance. This equality is shared by Call in many ways.

In defense of Call I don’t see him as a “confused and disoriented man” after the death of Gus. Quite the opposite. He is quite non-hesitant, has a promise to keep, a ranch to run, and goes about all these tasks with aforethought. Yes, a man of few words, but when he speaks you know it will happen: “I’ll be back in the spring.” Undertaker: “Yes, I believe you will.”
Cheers. My penny’s worth.


Attalus
Lorien


Feb 18, 6:46pm

Post #10 of 34 (4671 views)
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Deets? Naw [In reply to] Can't Post

If anything, Deets is closer to the superego if that analogy is continued (stretching it considerably) "No, sir, these pants gotta last.". As for Call at the end, he is returning to a ranch without hands (or stock) or much of a future. Going through the motions, as it were. You have to understand that I am going by the book, which I have read at least five times.

And I would have to say that I mourned for Deets a lot more than I did for Gus. "Damn, Woodrow, it's been a party." He's had his fun. Pirate


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 19, 7:12pm

Post #11 of 34 (4578 views)
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You’re probably right about Deets. [In reply to] Can't Post

The movie is fresher in my mind than the book. I’ve read it 3-4 times, but it’s been a while. And we are, or the subject IS “movie deaths”. And I’ve been basing my comments on same.

Seldom does a movie from a book live up to expectations. LOTR, of course, comes to mind. I literally read the books dozens of times before the movies came out. Although very well done I could never really get into the movies (as most here on TORn) as the inaccuracies, additions, etc. were almost a sacrilege to me.
Not so with Lonesome Dove. The movies, to me, meet and nearly surpass the book. And rereading the passages we’re talking about I see a quite accurate movie portrayal. But the film (in this case) has a quality that (to me) surpasses the book in many ways, most especially the death of Gus.

I threw Deets in there (knowing it would draw a comment Wink). Yes, Deets’ death is very moving and unexpected: Call: “We should have shot that boy.” Gus: “I don’t wanna think of what we should have done for this good man.” [paraphrasing]. I could have/should have mentioned Pea Eye also. I think my point was just to bring up the fact that Deets was an ongoing part of the Hat Creek Cattle Co. Whereas Jake was not a member. (Attempting to disassociate him from your trio.)

As for Call returning to a ranch “without hands (or stock) or much of a future”, I’m not sure what you mean here. The herd and the boys haven’t gone anywhere. Yes, Call is morose as he has lost a trio of his closest: Gus, Deets, and Jake. But he has a future such as it is, running a ranch and keeping a promise.

Your interesting quote by Deets, “Damn, Woodrow, it’s been a party.” is nearly identical to Gus’ last words to Call in the movie and nearly his last words in the book…
Interesting discussion ….Smile


Attalus
Lorien


Feb 19, 8:12pm

Post #12 of 34 (4569 views)
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Well, the dialogue [In reply to] Can't Post

...is mostly straight out of the book, and Larry McMurtry is an author with a gift for snappy dialogue. Wink I wish that PJ had been similarly reverent to JRRT. Brego the horse, indeed. Mad


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 19, 8:42pm

Post #13 of 34 (4563 views)
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Yes, the dialogue is masterful [In reply to] Can't Post

by a great wordsmith.

As an aside on how I found out about Lonesome Dove.
Years ago I was on an airplane (going somewhere?), and a fellow across the aisle from me had a book. He said he just couldn’t get into it and asked if I would like to give it a try. “Yes, of course.” It was Lonesome Dove and I was immediately hooked.

Different strokes for . . . Shocked


Alassëa Eruvande
Valinor


Feb 22, 5:25pm

Post #14 of 34 (4360 views)
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"Augustus." [In reply to] Can't Post

Gets me every time.


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Feb 22, 10:52pm

Post #15 of 34 (4336 views)
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I missed a very important one!!! Edward G. Robinson (Sol) in “Soylent Green”. [In reply to] Can't Post

His death is moving in several ways: This is Robinson’s last film. He dies (in real life soon after completing this film). He is near stone-deaf and his “vision” of the wonders of yesterday in the movie is added in later. Thus, as he lays comfortably on the gurney he hears nothing of “Morning” (I think) by Grieg and he sees none of the beautiful cineramic portrayals of Earth’s animals, countryside, flowers, skies, etc., yet his facial expressions of poignant wonder are classic Robinson acting.

Heston’s tears during this scene are real and not forced, knowing (somehow) that Robinson has not long to live (in real life AND in the film).

Sol: “I love you Thorn.” Thorn (Charlton Heston): “I love you too Sol.”

It's said that Robinson's wife would bring him lunch everyday during shooting, but that she could never hang around for this death scene. Just too hard for her. . .


Attalus
Lorien


Feb 23, 8:48pm

Post #16 of 34 (4279 views)
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Certainly [In reply to] Can't Post

...an improvement over his death scene in the original "Scarface": "Is this the end of Rico?"

OTOH, Jimmy Cagney's death scene is better in "The Roaring Twenties," Gladys George's epitaph for him is affecting: "He used to be somebody."

Some people prefer the ending of "White Heat." "Made it, Ma! Top of the world!"


Annael
Half-elven


Feb 24, 5:15am

Post #17 of 34 (4243 views)
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Crais and Talyn in "Farscape" [In reply to] Can't Post

chills


Annael
Half-elven


Feb 24, 5:18am

Post #18 of 34 (4241 views)
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second: Roy Batty in "Blade Runner" // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Attalus
Lorien


Feb 24, 7:33pm

Post #19 of 34 (4195 views)
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Yes... [In reply to] Can't Post

It was strange how much sympathy one could all of a sudden develop for the villain of the piece. It's called the "Tears in Rain Speech" and has an article to itself on Wiki: Rutger Hauer himself adapted the script the night before.

Quote
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.



Lissuin
Tol Eressea


Feb 24, 8:28pm

Post #20 of 34 (4189 views)
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Just this week someone I've known a while but not not well said, "Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion." [In reply to] Can't Post

I was surprised because he seemed much too young to roll that phrase out spontaneously, but he is a film buff, with the correct sensibilities. Smile Now we share another bond across generations.Evil


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Feb 28, 12:42pm

Post #21 of 34 (3972 views)
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Lefty on Buffy the Vampire Slayer movie [In reply to] Can't Post



Poor, poor Lefty

Gotta love Paul Reubens! :D


(This post was edited by grammaboodawg on Feb 28, 12:44pm)


Attalus
Lorien


Mar 1, 3:14am

Post #22 of 34 (3936 views)
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How about... [In reply to] Can't Post

...John Wayne's death in "Sands of Iwo Jima?" I cried when I was a kid Unsure


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Mar 1, 3:53am

Post #23 of 34 (3929 views)
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Ohhh... Not the Duke! [In reply to] Can't Post

I cried, too. I can't watch films where he dies. *sniffle*

*reaches for McClintock & Quiet Man*


Bracegirdle
Valinor


Mar 1, 10:55pm

Post #24 of 34 (3864 views)
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NOOOoooo !! John Wayne LIVES ! It was just a movie... Wadn't it ?? / [In reply to] Can't Post

 


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Mar 2, 1:19pm

Post #25 of 34 (3810 views)
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*pats shoulder* Yes :D You're absolutely right! // [In reply to] Can't Post

 

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