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JRRT Artist and Illustrator, Chapter 2 Visons, Myths and Legends Part II
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Saelind
Lorien


Mar 7 2007, 12:13am

Post #1 of 29 (359 views)
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JRRT Artist and Illustrator, Chapter 2 Visons, Myths and Legends Part II Can't Post

First installment of Silmarillion pictures.

Gondolin
“As depicted in Gondolin & the Vale of Tumladin from Cristhorn [58], dated September 1928, it is similar to the city in Tanaqui [43] , especially in its tall tower and in the steep cliffs of the hill; however, thirteen years later the architecture is more symmetrical- the tower is now in the centre… The wide road on the plain presumably runs between the city and the Way of Escape through the Encircling Mountains, south towards Sirion. … Cristhorn was the means by which Tuor and Idril escaped the sack of Gondolin, and the drawing recalls how in the Fall they looked back as the path wound round the shoulder of the hills and had a last glimpse of the city, burning and half-destroyed. In the picture Gondolin is at its full strength, whole and magnificent.”

http://i156.photobucket.com/...heValeofTumladin.jpg
Colored version: http://i156.photobucket.com/...lind/tolkienpics.jpg

Always thought the city took up the entire plain not just a hill. Looks very small compared with the surrounding area. In my reading, I always thought that the elvish kingdoms were bigger somehow.

Does the picture look like your “version” of Gondolin?

Nargothrond
“Tolkien made three illustrations of Nargothrond –four, if one includes Glórund. … All of these illustrations show three doors leading into the fortress and high hills and tree-covered lower slopes above and behind. In other respects they are quite different from one another. In [56] the entrances are visibly barred with the huge timbered doors described in the lays. In both the drawing [57] and the watercolor the doorways are correctly in the form of trilithons, pi-shaped with sloping sides. However they seem to be door-less, merely openings into the hill as in Glórund. Also, unlike [56] in these there is little attempt at concealment. In [57] Tolkien removed the centre steps to include the bridge built by Turin in the last days of Nargothrond.”

http://i156.photobucket.com/...ind/Nargothrond2.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/...ind/Nargothrond3.jpg
http://i156.photobucket.com/...Saelind/mirkwood.jpg

As it was discussed before, Tolkien reused elements from these pictures in his picture of Thurandil’s Halls in The Hobbit. Do any of these pictures look like what you thought the entrance of Nargothrond looked like?

Interestingly, we have pictures of Nargothrond and Gondolin but none of Menegroth.

Vale of Sirion
“The sun sinks behind the Eryd Lomin (later Ered Wethrin), the shadowy mountains in the west, opposite the rising Moon at right about the eaves of the forest. In the distance are Dor-na-Fauglith (Anfuoglith), ‘the fields of drouth, / the dusty dunes, the desert wide, and the horizon ‘the brooding cloud that hangs and lowers / on Thangorodrim’s thunderous towers’. The two birch trees in the foreground frame and emphasize the fortress on the island, above the caves hollowed out by water."

http://i156.photobucket.com/...ind/ValeofSirion.jpg

Mithrim
“This lake is mentioned in “The Book of Lost Tales but not described until later: it had ‘wide pale waters” it was ‘a great lake’, its ‘mighty waters reflect a pale image of the encircling hills’. Both the lake and the hills can be seen… the peak in the distance, left of centre is probably Thangorodrim: contemporary Sketch of the mythology implies that the hosts of Gnomes on either side of the Mithrim could see the ‘vast smokes and vapours… made and sent forth from Angband, and the smoking top of Thangorodrim...”

I like the patterned borders. I have a hard time seeing Thangorodrim in this picture.
http://i156.photobucket.com/.../Saelind/mithrim.jpg




Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Mar 7 2007, 2:49am

Post #2 of 29 (135 views)
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Mithrim [In reply to] Can't Post

 
Mithrim
This one is very eye pleasing, I do enjoy the intricacies of the border, yet is makes me ponder a few things. The border serves as a decorative device on the surface, but also serves to hold the viewer out. We get to view this beautiful and fantastic world in only a glimpse and are held back from getting any closer.

I wonder what compelled him to put borders on some images. I part the times, in part the influences of the decorative arts he enjoyed, but why this image and not some others. This image is vast in its scope, yet he puts a hard-tight border on it to seal off the edges…no entering, only looking and only a glimpse.

Websites Directory, my drawings, Aloha & Mahalo


Nienna: “those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta


a.s.
Valinor


Mar 7 2007, 12:01pm

Post #3 of 29 (125 views)
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"only a glimpse" of all the Elven halls [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
This image is vast in its scope, yet he puts a hard-tight border on it to seal off the edges…no entering, only looking and only a glimpse.



It struck me as I was looking at the pictures how "far away" the kingdoms are, how entirely hidden in trees/hills, etc. As though we might pass by them everyday when we take a walk in remote forest land and catch a glimpse only---and interpret what we see as "Faerie" or just our imaginations. Then I read your comment and thought you summed it up well: we can look, but not enter.

I don't get that same feeling when I look at the pictures where I can see actual doors to hilly kingdoms; those pictures just seem fantastical but real, because there are "real" doors with "real" hinges, etc.

But the ones where the kingdoms are just glimpsed vaguely seem much more like "Faerie" to me.

a.s.

"an seileachan"

Everybody's wondering what and where they all came from.
Everybody's worried 'bout where they're gonna go when the whole thing's done.
No one knows for certain, and so it's all the same to me:
I think I'll just let the mystery be.
~~~~Iris DeMent


Draupne
Forum Admin / Moderator

Mar 7 2007, 6:58pm

Post #4 of 29 (115 views)
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Looks pretty much like [In reply to] Can't Post

what "my" Gondolin looks like. Like the b/w ones best, the green in the coloured is a bit too green somehow.

Hmm, I don't see two birches. Isn't that a birch and an alder? There's no birches in LOTR, is there? Maybe they got taken over by spruce.


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 7 2007, 7:02pm

Post #5 of 29 (142 views)
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Did people not eat in Gondolin? [In reply to] Can't Post

Tolkien's portrayal of the valley around the city suffers from the same problem that viewers identified in Jackson's Pelennor fields: it lacks any sign of agriculture. (This is more obvious in Riddett's colored version.)

What's the spot on the plain just to the left of the hill?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 5-11: Tolkien's "Visions, Myths and Legends".


weaver
Half-elven

Mar 7 2007, 7:16pm

Post #6 of 29 (136 views)
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Not my Gondolin... [In reply to] Can't Post

...but I confess to not being a very careful reader of the Sil, so this may be exactly what he wrote and I just saw it otherwise!

I've always thought of that city like Shangri-la -- a hidden city nestled into and surrounded by mountains, and not isolated in the middle of a crater like this.

Nargothrond (sp?) looks almost hobbit-ish to me, if you made the doors round instead of angular.

My sense from these drawings is that Tolkien was focused more on the "essence" of those places, rather than anything architecturally or geographically realistic, or practical in any sense of the word. What I get most of of them is how they seem organic rather than built -- the landscape and the structures are sort of "one." They remind me of Japanese gardens I've visited, in that way, with the union of the artificial and the natural into pleasing arrangements.

I haven't been able to post much, but I am enjoying the images! Thank you!

Weaver


Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Mar 7 2007, 7:48pm

Post #7 of 29 (124 views)
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yes, nestled! [In reply to] Can't Post

That is exactly how I pictured Gondolin. Tolkien's image took me be surprise. Though last night I couldn't think of how to describe in words what i see in my head.

The color version reminds me a little of 3-D art, dimensional in some places, flat in others.
examples:
http://fan.theonering.net/...o/collection/aaldijk
or
http://fan.theonering.net/rolozo/collection/young

Websites Directory, my drawings, Aloha & Mahalo


Nienna: “those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 7 2007, 8:36pm

Post #8 of 29 (125 views)
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If Rivendell looked like... [In reply to] Can't Post

this, it'd be even more vulnerable than are most Tolkien fortresses to attack from above.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 5-11: Tolkien's "Visions, Myths and Legends".


a.s.
Valinor


Mar 7 2007, 9:27pm

Post #9 of 29 (137 views)
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"A savage place ! as holy and enchanted" [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
...but I confess to not being a very careful reader of the Sil, so this may be exactly what he wrote and I just saw it otherwise!

I've always thought of that city like Shangri-la -- a hidden city nestled into and surrounded by mountains, and not isolated in the middle of a crater like this.


Or Xanadu. For some reason, I always think of this Coleridge poem whenever I read about Gondolin. I also am not a "careful" Sil reader, and never can get the geographical descriptions down pat anyway (in any book), but something about the hidden and magical and "holy" nature of both just resonate.

Here's a pretty nifty page I found with infor about Gondolin and some illustrations.


In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree :
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man

Down to a sunless sea.

So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round :
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.
But oh ! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover !
A savage place ! as holy and enchanted
As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted
By woman wailing for her demon-lover !
And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced :
Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst
Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail :
And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever
It flung up momently the sacred river.
Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean :
And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far
Ancestral voices prophesying war !


The shadow of the dome of pleasure
Floated midway on the waves ;
Where was heard the mingled measure
From the fountain and the caves.

It was a miracle of rare device,
A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice !
A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw :
It was an Abyssinian maid,
And on her dulcimer she played,
Singing of Mount Abora.
Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight 'twould win me,

That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome ! those caves of ice !
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware ! Beware !
His flashing eyes, his floating hair !
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread,
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise


"an seileachan"

Everybody's wondering what and where they all came from.
Everybody's worried 'bout where they're gonna go when the whole thing's done.
No one knows for certain, and so it's all the same to me:
I think I'll just let the mystery be.
~~~~Iris DeMent


Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Mar 7 2007, 9:30pm

Post #10 of 29 (101 views)
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that is [In reply to] Can't Post

an awful image, as are most of them on both page.

Then I was not lookign at content but quality of the elements: shapes, lines, colors, values, etc.

Websites Directory, my drawings, Aloha & Mahalo


Nienna: “those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta


drogo
Lorien


Mar 7 2007, 9:33pm

Post #11 of 29 (114 views)
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I like the cultivated fields Nasmith adds [In reply to] Can't Post

This is a more believable image of the valley, inasmuch as it looks like it can sustain a whole city

http://img-fan.theonering.net/...nasmith/gondolin.jpg


(Formerly drogo of the two names!)


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 7 2007, 10:41pm

Post #12 of 29 (108 views)
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That is nice. [In reply to] Can't Post

And I see there's a larger version among the links that a.s. gives below.

Just today I was looking at maps for the Appalachian Trail in southwest Virginia, where the path runs down a ridge that skirts an agricultural valley called "Burke's Garden", sometimes locally refered to as "God's thumbprint", that is bounded by (low Appalachian) mountains on all sides (two small aerial views here and here). When I hiked there, I remember thinking fancifully of Gondolin, though there's no city in Burke's Garden, only farms. (That section of trail is the first place I ever saw a rattlesnake in the wild. Man did I jump when it rattled.)

I think Karen Fonstad, working from one of Tolkien's descriptions, has the valley shaped more elliptically than either Nasmith or Tolkien himself drew it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 5-11: Tolkien's "Visions, Myths and Legends".


weaver
Half-elven

Mar 7 2007, 11:10pm

Post #13 of 29 (92 views)
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Xanadu works, too -- and nice additional images! [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks for quoting the whole poem -- nice connection!

The Gondolin page you linked to was very nice! The two pieces with the dragons in them come closest to my image of the place...

Weaver


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 7 2007, 11:20pm

Post #14 of 29 (99 views)
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I saw Tolkien's image of Gondolin before I read... [In reply to] Can't Post

its description: I got Pictures by J.R.R. Tolkien as a gift in about 1981, when I was nine, and read The Silmarillion a year or two later.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 5-11: Tolkien's "Visions, Myths and Legends".


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 7 2007, 11:43pm

Post #15 of 29 (113 views)
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Didn't Tolkien paint a "Xanadu"? [In reply to] Can't Post

I haven't got either J.R.R. Tolkien: Artist & Illutrator the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia at hand, but I seem to remember one of dna's drafts for his "Koivië-néni and Cuiviénen" article suggesting Coleridge's poem as a source for Tolkien's description of the Elvish "waters of awakening", and I think he cited Hammond and Scull on this point.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 5-11: Tolkien's "Visions, Myths and Legends".


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator

Mar 8 2007, 1:19am

Post #16 of 29 (98 views)
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Yes, he did. [In reply to] Can't Post

"a sketch, made probably in 1913, of Xanadu after Coleridge [37]. From its roughness it seems to have been made quickly, and is on the back of a tailor's bill evidently snatched up on the spur of the moment. Tolkien must have been inspired to draw it as suddenly as Coleridge had been to write Kubla Khan when he work from his dream. It shows the 'chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething' in which a mighty fountain cascades down a cedar-covered slope to form the sacred river, Alph, which flows at lower left into the 'caverns measureless to man'. Behind the cleft is the 'stately pleasure-dome' decreed by Kubla Khan, like a Buddhist stupa with a tall finial. The spidery 'bridge' spanning the chasm is not in Coleridge, nor are the two trees or lamps drawn very small just over the tops of the two cliffs; but the latter look ahead to the Two Trees of Valinor in 'The Silmarillion'. Kubla Khan and Tolkien's vision of it may also be related to his description of the place where the Elves awoke in Middle-earth: 'Now the places about Koiviënéni the Waters of Awakening are rugged and full of mighty rocks, and the stream that feeds that water falls therein down a deep cleft . . . a pale and slender thread, but the issue of the dark lake was beneath the earth into many endless caverns falling ever more deeply into the bosom of the world."

A rather poor scan:






Promises to Keep: a novel set in 19th Century New Zealand.

The Passing of Mistress Rose

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Wynnie
Rohan


Mar 8 2007, 1:49am

Post #17 of 29 (94 views)
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It appears in Chapter 2 [In reply to] Can't Post

so should probably be coming up for discussion sometime this week.


Owlamoo
ink drawing by JRRT


a.s.
Valinor


Mar 8 2007, 1:51am

Post #18 of 29 (88 views)
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I thought about it first!!!!!! [In reply to] Can't Post

Hey, I just want my brownie points!!! I thought about Xanadu the very first time I read about Gondolin back in 1977.

No, just kidding (even though I forgot that Tolkien drew this...if I ever even noticed it). Thanks for quoting that. It's embarassing to say I own the book!!!

a.s.

"an seileachan"

Everybody's wondering what and where they all came from.
Everybody's worried 'bout where they're gonna go when the whole thing's done.
No one knows for certain, and so it's all the same to me:
I think I'll just let the mystery be.
~~~~Iris DeMent


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator

Mar 8 2007, 2:06am

Post #19 of 29 (91 views)
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*Awards brownie points* [In reply to] Can't Post

I believe you :-)

I own the book, too (obviously, since I just looked it up), and I had completely forgotten about "Xanadu".




Promises to Keep: a novel set in 19th Century New Zealand.

The Passing of Mistress Rose

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator

Mar 8 2007, 2:07am

Post #20 of 29 (85 views)
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Oops. [In reply to] Can't Post

That's what comes of living a day in the future - it leads to jumping the gun :-)




Promises to Keep: a novel set in 19th Century New Zealand.

The Passing of Mistress Rose

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


drogo
Lorien


Mar 8 2007, 2:22am

Post #21 of 29 (93 views)
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Those do resemble Gondolin [In reply to] Can't Post

I have seen several pictures of valleys that seem to fit Tolkien's description, but those are pretty good.


(Formerly drogo of the two names!)


Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Mar 8 2007, 3:02am

Post #22 of 29 (80 views)
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far away [In reply to] Can't Post

Sometimes I want very much to know the dates of these images, at least as it relates to what was happening in his life and his creations.

I sense that there is a possibility that he himself may have felt shut out of his own world at times. Maybe the natural barrier that a writer/artist feels when creating the thing that is new to him. Or, perhaps all his duties seemed to hinder him from his desired activities of creating these worlds. Or, maybe its the implied danger of Faerie itself...the barriers being a warning not to get too close, to him an dot us the viewer.

It is probably just simply that Faerie is only as close as our imagination, but as far away as actually ever being there in reality. Frown



In Reply To

In Reply To
This image is vast in its scope, yet he puts a hard-tight border on it to seal off the edges…no entering, only looking and only a glimpse.


It struck me as I was looking at the pictures how "far away" the kingdoms are, how entirely hidden in trees/hills, etc. As though we might pass by them everyday when we take a walk in remote forest land and catch a glimpse only---and interpret what we see as "Faerie" or just our imaginations. Then I read your comment and thought you summed it up well: we can look, but not enter.

I don't get that same feeling when I look at the pictures where I can see actual doors to hilly kingdoms; those pictures just seem fantastical but real, because there are "real" doors with "real" hinges, etc.

But the ones where the kingdoms are just glimpsed vaguely seem much more like "Faerie" to me.

a.s.


Websites Directory, my drawings, Aloha & Mahalo


Nienna: “those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta


squire
Valinor


Mar 9 2007, 3:58am

Post #23 of 29 (100 views)
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Gondolin, Isengard, Le Corbusier, and Speer [In reply to] Can't Post




What an odd drawing. The focus is supposed to be the hidden city, but it is tiny and faint in the distance. The most "worked" part of the drawing is the sequence of cliffs on the left, which thus pulls the eye completely off subject. Meanwhile, the entire right of the drawing is cut off by an arbitrary slope line with so little meaning that the entire composition becomes a trapezoid that breaks the picture plane into fragments and betrays the very idea of the picture.
The left side cliffs, which are reminiscent of his Misty Mountains and Lonely Mountain in The Hobbit with their obsessive line patterns, show that the entire thing is really a gigantic doodle. I suspect he laid out the drawing to show himself how Gondolin looked, got caught up in patterning the left foreground and dropped the entire project as soon as the doodling fit had past.

As far as the subject goes, all I can think of is Isengard. Tolkien had certain fixed images in his head involving cities, which had little to do with any real cities I've ever heard of. I'm not sure why he loved the idea of a tower built on a projection of rock in the midst of a wide circular plain surrounded by mountains, but what is clear is that he surely did.
As NE Brigand has noted, such an arrangement makes food a problem; and Ted Nasmith provides for agriculture in his version:



But Nasmith has done something interesting, especially when we compare him to Tolkien's own version of Gondolin. Nasmith's fields have a pure geometry that translates to a gigantic social order, where the entire civilization sticks to one great plan. His vision reminds me of Corbusier or Wright (especially Wright, who loved circles) with their insistence on a single omniscient and omnipotent city planner. And their ideology prevailed exactly when when Tolkien was writing of Gondolin, in the early 20th century with its post-Victorian and post-WW I idealism, and its proto-totalitarian belief in the social collective guided by a visionary leader.

Is that what Tolkien meant when he imagined Gondolin: a Brasilia or a Corbusian post-Paris or Wright's Usonia or Speer's Berlin? If you read the text, it is possible to see just that, and I imagine that's what Nasmith read and saw too.

But look at Tolkien's vision. It's picturesque in its unconsciousness. There's no science there, no all-powerful city-state. In fact, it's naive. It's obsession with towers (echoed in those things along the road - like the bollards in Isengard, I think), and with the purely graphic textures, shows no awareness of things that a real city would need. It's a true fantasy. And it's nothing but a doodle.

Sometimes the well-formed dreams of idealists and poets and artists, with their lonely psychological dynamics, are seized upon by others and made into nightmares. But with Tolkien, pace Corbu and Wright and Speer, I believe he himself began to understand what it all meant, when he translated the anti-paradisical paradise of Gondolin into the science park gone mad that he called Isengard.






squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Footeramas: The 3rd TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion; and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Mar 9 2007, 4:14am

Post #24 of 29 (86 views)
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Nice catch! [In reply to] Can't Post

What a fascinating comparison. Can a resemblance between the structure of Isengard and of Hell in The Divine Comedy be thrown into the mix?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Mar. 5-11: Tolkien's "Visions, Myths and Legends".


a.s.
Valinor


Mar 9 2007, 11:27am

Post #25 of 29 (116 views)
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who's Cobusier? Wright? Speer? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

But Nasmith has done something interesting, especially when we compare him to Tolkien's own version of Gondolin. Nasmith's fields have a pure geometry that translates to a gigantic social order, where the entire civilization sticks to one great plan. His vision reminds me of Corbusier or Wright (especially Wright, who loved circles) with their insistence on a single omniscient and omnipotent city planner. And their ideology prevailed exactly when when Tolkien was writing of Gondolin, in the early 20th century with its post-Victorian and post-WW I idealism, and its proto-totalitarian belief in the social collective guided by a visionary leader.

Is that what Tolkien meant when he imagined Gondolin: a Brasilia or a Corbusian post-Paris or Wright's Usonia or Speer's Berlin? If you read the text, it is possible to see just that, and I imagine that's what Nasmith read and saw too.





Who's those guys? Talk down to me.

Evil

a.s.

"an seileachan"

Everybody's wondering what and where they all came from.
Everybody's worried 'bout where they're gonna go when the whole thing's done.
No one knows for certain, and so it's all the same to me:
I think I'll just let the mystery be.
~~~~Iris DeMent

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