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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Movie Discussion: The Lord of the Rings:
Screencap of the Day -- I'm glad to be with you, Samwise Gamgee

Arwen's daughter
Half-elven


Jul 23 2014, 9:41pm

Post #1 of 6 (251 views)
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Screencap of the Day -- I'm glad to be with you, Samwise Gamgee Can't Post


You can find the full-sized image HERE if you're so inclined.

1. Did you believe that this really was the end of all things?

2. This is the first time in a long time that Frodo has been the one to comfort Sam. How has their friendship changed on this journey?

3. In the past, we've talked about the switch to the line here. In the book the line is "I'm glad you're here with me." In the movie the line is "I'm glad to be with you." Do you think there's a significance to that change?

4. Any other thoughts or comments?


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cats16
Valinor


Jul 24 2014, 5:24am

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So powerful [In reply to] Can't Post

1. Being a movie-firster, yes, I thought it was the end and they were going to die there. I thought the fade out with them on the rock was the end of the movie...quite a sad few seconds, until Gandalf came. CrazyCool

2. A good question! I think they now have a bond that few people have come to create with another person, being through a journey unimaginable to most of us. In the films, the class dynamic of their relationship seems present throughout, but not as apparent as it is in the books (to me, that is). The movies express this with the way Sam addresses Frodo ("Mister Frodo" and "Master"), with him coming to call him by his first name in the end (and only "Mr." in the way that social equals might do so in conversation). That's just a brief thought to a question worthy of many more words.

3. I see it as placing much more emphasis on Sam's role here, with Frodo actively aware of the importance Sam played, and greatly appreciative of it.

4. Tearing up just looking at the still image.

(I'm now reminded of something near this part I've always found interesting: Gandalf arrives with three Eagles; I presume the other was for Gollum, if he should have lived the destruction of the Ring. Nothing of great interest, but I find it a remarkable move by Gandalf nonetheless given everything we know at this point. Sorry for my wandering away from the topic at hand!! *slaps wrists*)


Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Jul 24 2014, 1:40pm

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An excellent point, cats! [In reply to] Can't Post


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(I'm now reminded of something near this part I've always found interesting: Gandalf arrives with three Eagles; I presume the other was for Gollum, if he should have lived the destruction of the Ring. Nothing of great interest, but I find it a remarkable move by Gandalf nonetheless given everything we know at this point. Sorry for my wandering away from the topic at hand!! *slaps wrists*)



It's not quite as apparent in the movies, but in the books it's clear that not only Frodo, but Gandalf also, has hope that the good left in Gollum will prevail. (For just one example on Frodo's part, in TTT, Gollum says Sméagol went away--they took his Precious and now he's lost. But Frodo replies, "Perhaps we'll find him again, if you come with us.") Gandalf has the same kind of hope for Saruman...also to no avail. But it is rather touching to think that perhaps the third Eagle was for Gollum--certainly not out of character for Gandalf. Evil


“Tollers,” Lewis said to Tolkien, “there is too little of what we really like in stories. I am afraid we shall have to try and write some ourselves.”



Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Jul 24 2014, 1:53pm

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At the end of all things... [In reply to] Can't Post

1. No, I had read the books many times so I knew the end. But I would have loved to have experienced this moment not knowing--it would have made it more powerful for me, I think.

2. Frodo has had the strength for only one hope on this terrible journey--to fulfill the quest. Sam has carried everything else, including the hope of returning. Now that Frodo is free of his burden, he is also free to comfort Sam in a way he could not before. One of the great themes of LOTR is fellowship and friendship, and here we see an example of one of the main ways Tolkien developed it: that through hardship and common purpose (through fire, if you will Smile), friendships are strengthened and deepened. This powerful picture alone tells us the depth that their friendship has. There is no embarrassment in tears and grief. All that has been laid bare long ago and left behind.

3. I'm sure there's a lot more to say, but I think the switch of lines is significant. It represents a change in status, IMO, from master-servant to friend-friend.

4. I think it is so sweet that Sam has been cherishing this dream of Rosie all along (it was hard to tell if he just had a crush on her or it was the real thing), and never once mentioned the sacrifice it was for him to go away with Frodo. Evil Aww, Sam! Heart


“Tollers,” Lewis said to Tolkien, “there is too little of what we really like in stories. I am afraid we shall have to try and write some ourselves.”



cats16
Valinor


Jul 24 2014, 11:31pm

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Why, thank you! [In reply to] Can't Post

Ah, that part from TTT gives me the creeps. The Frodo/Sam storyline in TTT always reminds me of some sort of post-apocalyptic novel, with a gangly survivor leading them. There is Ithilien to break it up, but much of the descriptions of the land near Mordor come across that way to me.

I suppose it's my own UUT, as some would say, but like you said, it's a nice thought nonetheless! Smile


Loresilme
Valinor


Aug 3 2014, 12:57pm

Post #6 of 6 (94 views)
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Thoughts [In reply to] Can't Post

1. Did you believe that this really was the end of all things?
Movie firster...yes I did. And when the eagles showed up, accompanied by that gorgeous solo, I thought it was the most moving, most beautiful thing I'd ever witnessed in a film, ever. And I would say how many years later is it? I still feel that way.

Sort of a funny aside: I had heard the expression over the years "Here at the end of all things", in different contexts, and knew it was from LOTR but not what it meant, the same way I'd seen graffiti and buttons that said "Frodo lives" and "Gandalf for President". So when I was watching this scene (sobbing, beyond words) there was this small part of my brain that was still coherent and logical, and it suddenly piped up and thought, "Oh! That's where that came from. How interesting." lol... while the rest of me was this complete emotional wreck Crazy.

2. This is the first time in a long time that Frodo has been the one to comfort Sam. How has their friendship changed on this journey?
Sam's been so selfless up to this point, that no one even realizes what he has given up in order to accompany Frodo on the quest. And Frodo's been so consumed by the Ring, this is now the first time he can recall clearly all that Sam did. Frodo knows he 'wouldn't have got far" without Sam.

3. In the past, we've talked about the switch to the line here. In the book the line is "I'm glad you're here with me." In the movie the line is "I'm glad to be with you." Do you think there's a significance to that change?
I think there are character arcs, and in this particular story there is also a relationship arc, and the relationship between Frodo and Sam changes over time just like a character changes over time. At the ending of filmFOTR, and at the starting point of their solo quest together, Frodo says, "Sam, I’m glad you’re with me." Here, at the end of their solo quest together, Frodo says, "I'm glad to be with you." The shift in emphasis from "me" to "you", expresses the change in their relationship from master/servant to friend/friend. What an excellent use of dialogue to convey huge amounts information in just a few words.

4. Any other thoughts or comments?
Sean Astin and Elijah Wood were incredible in this scene. It still makes me cry. Even looking at just the still image, I get teared up.

 
 

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