Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Movie Discussion: The Hobbit:
Chapter of the Week: A Good Omen
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

DanielLB
Immortal


May 17 2014, 8:32pm

Post #26 of 47 (281 views)
Shortcut
I don't see a problem with getting the audience to use their imagination. [In reply to] Can't Post

One has to do it in when reading the books, after all. You have to imagine the movie-universe is bigger than what we are shown - I like to imagine the Hobbits meeting Bombadil, Quickbeam in Fangorn and the terrifying Barrow-wights actually taking place - we are just not shown those scenes.

It's not about fans trying to come up with explanations to explain inconsistencies, its about imagining the characters actually doing things in between scenes.


pettytyrant101
Lorien


May 17 2014, 9:02pm

Post #27 of 47 (270 views)
Shortcut
I don't believe [In reply to] Can't Post

titles would have been appropriate or necessary, but fades of a variety of sorts in the hands of a skilful editor could have been used, time-lapse has been used in other films, or even a simple covering piece of dialogue to indicate they had been up the trees some time perhaps.

I am not particularly suggesting any of these methods, merely indicating that there are options available and something suitable could be found had the script showed any indication it needed to convey a passage of time- which it appears it did not.

My own suspicion therefore is the choice of time of day in those scenes was made long after the scripting, and that PJ liked the look of the sunset and equally liked the eagle scene set to a sunrise, and that the visual images he had overwrote any other considerations, such as it making sense.

There is precedent for this in LotR's too, for example Denethor's death.
After giving us establishing shots earlier in the film where Pippin follows Denethor through the courtyard, all the way down the stairs and then across the long bridge, PJ cavalierly throws all sense and likelihood out of the window by having Denethor then run this huge uphill distance, on fire, just to throw himself off the end of the Courtyard.

Why does PJ do this? By his own admission because he thought the image of a burning Denethor diving off there would look 'cool'. The fact that it is about a quarter of a mile away, that involves running not only along a long bridge, but up a flight of stairs and the entire length of the Court, whilst burning to death doesn't come into.

PJ it seems is primarily motivated by visuals, by the imagery, even when it makes no sense in a narrative way. It is more explicit in TH films than in LotR's but you can see examples of it in all his ME films.

If you are the sort of person who doesn't care about this sort of thing then it wont damage your viewing of the films I guess.

But I tend to feel, especially when adapting an author who is so careful over such matters as times of day, year and phases of the moon, that to just throw logic out entirely for visuals reduces my enjoyment (the actual script does the rest of the damage).

"A lot of our heroes depress me. But when they made this particular hero they didn't give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver so he could fix things. They didn't give him a tank, or a warship, or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn't give him a superpower, or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. And that's an extraordinary thing.
There will never come a time when we don't need a hero like the Doctor."- Steven Moffat

(This post was edited by pettytyrant101 on May 17 2014, 9:07pm)


pettytyrant101
Lorien


May 17 2014, 9:04pm

Post #28 of 47 (272 views)
Shortcut
I feel [In reply to] Can't Post

you have to judge a film on what is in it, not on what you wish was in it, or what you can fill into the gaps.

Doing so for your own pleasure is of course your prerogative and absolutely fine.
But doing so in order to defend a film on the merits of it being judged as a film I dont think is right.

And what of those who have no knowledge of the books? They cant add in the good stuff PJ left out to make the films better- they have to take it on its own merits.

It has to stand or fall on its own content as a film.

"A lot of our heroes depress me. But when they made this particular hero they didn't give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver so he could fix things. They didn't give him a tank, or a warship, or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn't give him a superpower, or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. And that's an extraordinary thing.
There will never come a time when we don't need a hero like the Doctor."- Steven Moffat

(This post was edited by pettytyrant101 on May 17 2014, 9:08pm)


SafeUnderHill
Rohan

May 17 2014, 10:25pm

Post #29 of 47 (258 views)
Shortcut
In my opinion [In reply to] Can't Post

It is more important for a scene to be enjoyable than completely realistic, is not after all a historic document or a piece of evidence documenting the books in a court of law but a piece of entertainment.

I'm not going to argue about this any further as I think we are just speculating on something that PJ could easily (and would probably be happy to) answer himself. If he decided to make backgrounds visually appealing and as a result the timeline of the scene to make it look better, then good for him. I'm sure he spends many hours thinking about every decision, but to call such a decision 'sloppy' or 'careless' is IMO unwarranted.

On a personal level, I can understand different people will be bothered in different ways. Personally, I never really noticed the timeline of the scene nor will it ever bother me. But I guess it bothers some people. I just remember it being a really beautiful scene, and possible errors don't detriment the beauty of it.


pettytyrant101
Lorien


May 17 2014, 11:54pm

Post #30 of 47 (248 views)
Shortcut
I did not [In reply to] Can't Post

call this particular decision sloppy.
I called the writing choice to undo the last fifteen minutes of film regards Thorin's injuries with a hand wave as sloppy. Thorin is only in this position as part of the re-jigging to give the film an ending at this point where none was originally written in. And then they need to get rid of it again, and they do so by having Gandalf vaguely wave and mutter at him and bobs your uncle he's right as rain again.

"A lot of our heroes depress me. But when they made this particular hero they didn't give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver so he could fix things. They didn't give him a tank, or a warship, or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn't give him a superpower, or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. And that's an extraordinary thing.
There will never come a time when we don't need a hero like the Doctor."- Steven Moffat


Annatar598
Rohan


May 18 2014, 2:24am

Post #31 of 47 (244 views)
Shortcut
No different than 70% of the Hobbit book [In reply to] Can't Post

where Gandalf miraculously saves the Dwarves at the right time.

Realize that the source material works on deux ex machinas all the time. Gandalf was Tolkien's plot advancement token.

It's astounding how so many Hobbit "fans" trash the movies for the same negative qualities that the book shares.

And it doesn't really matter what your brain thinks. It's FILM, its a medium where you can't show time as it is. You need to quicken things up. I don't see what's wrong with PJ when every director employs this manipulation of time.

Would you prefer that we sit all the way through movies to see characters sleep?

"[Annatar598] is an overzealous apologist [for PJ]" - Certain TORn member.

Really? Alright...

Well, proud to be one I guess.

(This post was edited by Annatar598 on May 18 2014, 2:26am)


pettytyrant101
Lorien


May 18 2014, 3:15am

Post #32 of 47 (237 views)
Shortcut
I don't agree [In reply to] Can't Post

Gandalf in the book is not just a deux ex machina, he serves a larger purpose in the development of Bilbo.

The first major adventure is with the trolls- and Bilbo and all the dwarves are helpless and captured and Gandalf's turns up to save them.

Next up is in the goblin tunnels- once again everyone is captured except Gandalf, but this time he only rescues the dwarves, Bilbo is left behind and forced to find his courage in the dark to go on alone, and to meet Gollum, and to escape and then sneak up on the dwarves. Thus impressing them for the first time.

Then Gandalf leaves for the next big adventure which is in Mirkwood and the ElvenKings Halls, but this time when they get captured he does not show up to rescue them, but Bilbo has now grown enough to rescue the dwarves all by himself and to earn all their respect so that they tend to look to him before Thorin for leadership from then on.

Of course none of this crafted development happens in the film between Gandalf's actions and Bilbo slowly finding his own courage because of it and stepping up to the plate when the moment comes.

In the film at the trolls it is Bilbo, acting way too soon and with way too much confidence when confronting trolls right after leaving home, is proactive and stalls long enough for Gandalf to do his thing.

And in the goblin tunnels he separated from the rest when Gandalf is not present and before Gandalf rescues anyone. Thus negating a large part of what Tolkien uses Gandalf for in relation to Bilbos growth when it comes to rescues.

And though Bilbo does rescue the dwarves from the spiders and the Elvenking halls the sgnifcance of this is not there as he has already killed a goblin and a warg and saved Thorin's life a film ago, nor do the dwarves change their view of him and look to him first. Partly because of the changes to Thorin's character and arc too.

So I cannot agree Gandalf is merely a deux ex machina in the book.

But ironically by detaching his actions from Bilbo's development the films make him more of one however, particularly in the goblin town section where his sudden reappearance serves no other purpose now but to rescue all the dwarves.

"A lot of our heroes depress me. But when they made this particular hero they didn't give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver so he could fix things. They didn't give him a tank, or a warship, or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn't give him a superpower, or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. And that's an extraordinary thing.
There will never come a time when we don't need a hero like the Doctor."- Steven Moffat

(This post was edited by pettytyrant101 on May 18 2014, 3:18am)


NecromancerRising
Gondor


May 18 2014, 5:46am

Post #33 of 47 (220 views)
Shortcut
An exquisite sequence.A true highlight of AUJ. [In reply to] Can't Post

1. What do you make of this montage? How would you comment the cinematography, editing, visual effects, score etc.?

The cinematography of this sequence is breathtaking with all these fantastic locations we see during the flight.Visually,it is stunning and the score is one of the best.Ethereal,with a discreet lyricism.It comes across as a major relief for the viewer after all the dangers our heroes encountered right before that.

2. What about the Eagles themselves? Do they come off as realistic to you? How would you compare these Eagles with those we saw in LOTR?
The Eagles design and animation is an improvement over LOTR.More natural and realistic.Their claws,their eyes,their movement,they all look great.

3. Did you notice that the Carrock is shaped like a bear? Do you like this “little” detail?
I noticed that detail during my second viewing of the film and thought that attention to details from the filmmakers was outstanding once more.Things like this make me appreciate them even more than i do.

4. What did you think was going to happen to him? In case you hadn’t read the book before you saw the film, were you afraid he might die?

I had read the book many times so i was certain he would not die.Although,i was a bit sad about his injuries and defeat by his ArchNemesis,Azog.

5. What kind of a spell do you think Gandalf is whispering? Could it be the same he uses on Pippin in ROTK after the incident with the palantír?

Certainly,a healing one bearing many similarities to the one he used on Pippin.

6. Did you believe Thorin was still discontented with Bilbo?

Not at all.The screenwriters were playing with the audience once more. It was pretty obvious.

7. What could have our burglar been thinking of at that moment?

Our burglar was thinking what a grumpy and ungrateful Dwarf Thorin was with an aura of discontent illustrated on his face.If i were Jackson,i would share that sentiment exactly, towards some members/fans of Middle Earth.After Thoring hugs him,a sense of relief and surprise from Bilbo is also obvious as he hugs him back.

8. What kind of emotions does this moment create in you? What do you make of this turn of events?

It was a totally cliche scene but still managed to bring a stupid smile upon my face .Frankly,i was expecting this scene to take place in Mirkwood.The realisation of Thorin that Bilbo is a capable member of their company after killing a spider.But,i understand the need for such a scene in the end of AUJ.An emotional resonance was necessary.

9. What do you think of the reactions of the others? Does someone’s reaction stand out from the rest for you?

They were totally flushed with exhilaration and joy, that
their leader,finally managed to accept Bilbo as a worthy member of their quest

10. What was your reaction when you first saw the mountain in the distance?

There is still a long long way to go...

11. What about that of the characters? How would you describe their response, let's say, in one word?

Impressed

12. Why end the film with such an obviously ironic note?

Because there is an obvious irony.I remember myself thinking "Yeah,sure sure"Laugh

13. Do you feel it was a good place where to end the first film?

I think it was the perfect spot for the closure of the first movie,knowing beforehand that there were 2 more to come.Their journey across the Misty Mountains had officially ended.New and much more dangerous stakes were now in front of them.

14. Do you think this shot of the thrush flying across the lifeless land around Erebor was a deliberate move by the filmmakers to connect the first film to the second one titled The Desolation of Smaug or simply a coincidence?

It was an undoubtedly deliberate move to connect AUJ with the "Desolation of Smaug"

15. In your opinion, was this a great way to end the first film? What kind of alternative endings could you imagine?

I could not think of a better way to end this.The temporay state of safety by our main characters after all the stakes they encountered in the Goblin Caves and outside them.Smaug's opening eye is the perfect foreshadowing for the next film

16. Does it make a good closing credit song (for a Middle-earth film)?

This still remains my favourite song of all.Great lyrics,great music,great performance by Neil Finn.I still get goosebumps whenever i hear it,especially the instrumental part which begins at around 2 :45.Perfect!!

"Obsession and narrow-mindness is the trend of the 2000's and synonyms to many Tolkien fanatics"


BlackFox
Valinor


May 18 2014, 8:48am

Post #34 of 47 (199 views)
Shortcut
Thanks for taking the time to answer, Necromancer! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Ethereal,with a discreet lyricism.

Oh, excellently put! Smile


"Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake." - Henry David Thoreau


cats16
Valinor


May 18 2014, 9:20am

Post #35 of 47 (212 views)
Shortcut
We're baaaaack! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
AUJ Chapter of the Week: A Good Omen


I. THE FLIGHT OF THE EAGLES
1. What do you make of this montage? How would you comment the cinematography, editing, visual effects, score etc.?
Simply wonderful! The cinematography is much more calm, sitting back rather than the 'swooping' motion we see in Goblintown. I prefer this *much* more. Much more similar to what we see in the grand landscape shots of LOTR (not that that matters entirely). The editing also seems to let this sequence breathe, allowing the Eagles to float--and descend--to the rock. No quick cuts needed.

The VFX is incredible here. The realization of the Eagles' bodies is amazing, and the layering with the Eagles and the environment is wonderfully realized. The score...phenomenal. Love hearing the chorus (which I would have loved even *more* of!).
2. What about the Eagles themselves? Do they come off as realistic to you? How would you compare these Eagles with those we saw in LOTR?
Definitely! I think they work very well here, both in the daylight and nighttime sequences. Harder to compare between trilogies, since in LOTR we see Gwaihir for only a couple of seconds--but I like both.
3. Did you notice that the Carrock is shaped like a bear? Do you like this “little” detail?

I actually missed this the first time. Or, rather, I *thought* I saw it, but missed the real thing. I was looking too generally at the Carrock, and thought I saw a bear's figure on a larger scale. Tl;dr- I saw the wrong thing. Smile

I loved this detail. It's a great nod to folks like us as to what's coming in DOS, and something we can point out to non-fans who are interested.
4. What did you think was going to happen to him? In case you hadn’t read the book before you saw the film, were you afraid he might die?
I think I wondered whether or not it would end in a cliffhanger, leaving us to wonder whether or not Thorin was alive. That *would* have been a tease for those not familiar with the text!
5. What kind of a spell do you think Gandalf is whispering? Could it be the same he uses on Pippin in ROTK after the incident with the palantír?
Likely a similar spell. The music *felt* similar, too. Sort of a reviving spell, I suppose.
II. “I’VE NEVER BEEN SO WRONG IN ALL MY LIFE!”
6. Did you believe Thorin was still discontented with Bilbo?
Yep.
7. What could have our burglar been thinking of at that moment?
"Don't hit me, don't hit me don't---"
8. What kind of emotions does this moment create in you? What do you make of this turn of events?
Surge of sentimentality (that sounds negative at heart, but I don't necessarily mean so). I think it's quite an emotional pivot, as we think Thorin might be dead, then he's alive, then he's angry with Bilbo, then it's all better. It's a lot at once, and I could see this coming off as sentimental (in a bad way) for some.
9. What do you think of the reactions of the others? Does someone’s reaction stand out from the rest for you?
Bifur, always. That fist pump never gets old! Laugh
III. A GOOD OMEN
10. What was your reaction when you first saw the mountain in the distance?
Such a magnificent shot. Very painterly. There's something about these large scale shots of ME that I find captivating. My eyes really love to explore the frame; here, I can wander left and right, seeing the river below, the forest ahead, the sky, and the mountain far off beyond.
11. What about that of the characters? How would you describe their response, let's say, in one word?
Well, another great shot. The scaling really works well here. The sunrise gives a great sense of warmth to the end of the film. Hope is revived, and the quest may continue. The worst is behind them. They're wrong, of course, but why not let them think that until the next movie comes out. Tongue
Next, a bird cheeps and flies by. “A raven!” cries Oin. “The birds are returning to the mountain.” Gandalf corrects him by saying it’s a thrush instead. “But we’ll take it as a sign – a good omen,” declares Thorin, to which Bilbo replies: “You’re right. I do believe the worst is behind us.”
12. Why end the film with such an obviously ironic note?
Sometimes self-deception is the only way to move forward. Yes, danger is obviously still following and ahead of them. So, at this moment, all is safe and sound. Optimism is very contagious; pessimism, thought, is the same way. They need to stay positive; it's one thing to have conflict coming from without, but, from within the group, *that* is where things may fall apart.
13. Do you feel it was a good place where to end the first film?
I think there are some issues throughout the film that make it harder to establish the amount of ground covered in the film. But, I think this works (without considering the fight sequence before this). There were many options--this might not have been the best, in my eyes, but I accept it and think it does work well enough.
IV. THE EYE OF THE DRAGON
14. Do you think this shot of the thrush flying across the lifeless land around Erebor was a deliberate move by the filmmakers to connect the first film to the second one titled The Desolation of Smaug or simply a coincidence?
Definitely a connection to the next film. There aren't three books in this trilogy. So, there needs to be a more evident transition between movie 1 and 2.
15. In your opinion, was this a great way to end the first film? What kind of alternative endings could you imagine?

I liked it. Hmm...if we're assuming the Company was still at the Carrock, perhaps I would've had a *gasp* walking shot from above and behind it. I think a walking shot--not necessarily the same as the one for FOTR--would have given the ending some momentum forward in the journey.
16. Does it make a good closing credit song (for a Middle-earth film)?
Sure. I wasn't sure at first, but I grew to like it pretty quickly.
17. Is there anything else you’d like to say about this chapter? Any additional comments or observations?
Thanks again, BlackFox, as always! Beautiful screencaps to end AUJ. Thanks to anyone who has participated in this great discussion!!

DOS CHOW will be starting soon, so everyone keep an eye out for a sign-up post in the coming days! Smile



(This post was edited by cats16 on May 18 2014, 9:21am)


NecromancerRising
Gondor


May 18 2014, 9:22am

Post #36 of 47 (184 views)
Shortcut
You are welcome Fox! [In reply to] Can't Post

Great questions and screencapsCool

"Obsession and narrow-mindness is the trend of the 2000's and synonyms to many Tolkien fanatics"


cats16
Valinor


May 18 2014, 9:24am

Post #37 of 47 (193 views)
Shortcut
Interesting to hear that! [In reply to] Can't Post

Even as someone who had read the book, I was wondering how he would recover from such a beating. Cool


cats16
Valinor


May 18 2014, 9:30am

Post #38 of 47 (187 views)
Shortcut
Reminds me of my avatar, actually [In reply to] Can't Post

Now that I see the picture from the Ring motif, it's quite similar to the Huor/Húrin shot (at least in composition). Or at least how I imagine that scene in motion during a film. *suddenly realizes he really wishes to see Gondolin on film someday*

Knowing the concept artists, this very well may have been intentional (though I won't assume it!).


BlackFox
Valinor


May 18 2014, 9:53am

Post #39 of 47 (192 views)
Shortcut
Thank you for your thorough answers! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
12. Why end the film with such an obviously ironic note?
Sometimes self-deception is the only way to move forward. Yes, danger is obviously still following and ahead of them. So, at this moment, all is safe and sound. Optimism is very contagious; pessimism, thought, is the same way. They need to stay positive; it's one thing to have conflict coming from without, but, from within the group, *that* is where things may fall apart.

Well said. The ending of AUJ reminds me that of FOTR. The endings of DOS and TTT are, on the other hand, much more ominous.

Thank you so much for organizing, cats! Smile


"Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake." - Henry David Thoreau


pettytyrant101
Lorien


May 18 2014, 7:20pm

Post #40 of 47 (162 views)
Shortcut
What about last chapter? [In reply to] Can't Post

Will it appear at some point or are we wisely all going to pretend it just never happened at all. Wink

"A lot of our heroes depress me. But when they made this particular hero they didn't give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver so he could fix things. They didn't give him a tank, or a warship, or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn't give him a superpower, or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. And that's an extraordinary thing.
There will never come a time when we don't need a hero like the Doctor."- Steven Moffat


cats16
Valinor


May 18 2014, 7:39pm

Post #41 of 47 (156 views)
Shortcut
I have a guess... [In reply to] Can't Post

...as to which you would prefer. TongueLaugh

It very well may appear at some point. For now, though, it's onward to DOS. Smile


pettytyrant101
Lorien


May 18 2014, 8:30pm

Post #42 of 47 (159 views)
Shortcut
I don't think [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
For now, though, it's onward to DOS. Smile


that helps!! Mad


"A lot of our heroes depress me. But when they made this particular hero they didn't give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver so he could fix things. They didn't give him a tank, or a warship, or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn't give him a superpower, or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. And that's an extraordinary thing.
There will never come a time when we don't need a hero like the Doctor."- Steven Moffat


cats16
Valinor


May 19 2014, 11:22am

Post #43 of 47 (105 views)
Shortcut
Thank *you*! [In reply to] Can't Post

Agreed on the endings to each film. TTT, to me, ended on just as big of a cliffhanger as did DOS (I hadn't read the books yet, to be fair).

I remember when Gollum spouted out something about "She could do it!", I got a mad rush of anxiety seeing this for the first time, realizing the true danger they were following. Ah, the memories. Cool

Thanks, as always, for compiling such wonderful screencaps and questions, BF. Smile


elostirion74
Rohan

May 19 2014, 3:08pm

Post #44 of 47 (103 views)
Shortcut
hmmm [In reply to] Can't Post

I agree with you mostly about needing to keep track of the day in a film, and this particular montage I enjoy immensely, but different viewers react to different things. Tolkien himself was very careful with maintaining logical consistency about the weather, the time of day, the moon phases and so on when he wrote about two different events taking place at the same time and at different locations. Personally I think the beauty of this montage and how it connects to Tolkien's focus on the beauty of the natural world is more important than the focus on logical consistency about the time of the day, but I expect that such details would feel very different for a person who largely disliked the film than someone who mostly enjoyed the film. If you for the most part disliked a film, it's more likely that details or logical mistakes like this will feel grating.


Old Pilgrim
Rivendell


May 23 2014, 5:01am

Post #45 of 47 (72 views)
Shortcut
Chapter [In reply to] Can't Post

1. What do you make of this montage? How would you comment the cinematography, editing, visual effects, score etc.?
Just beautiful. During my first watch of this movie I wasn't so impressed by it as I am now, but even then I have enjoy this scene very much. It is so majestic, you can see more of magical Middle Earth and the quality of pictures is just amazing - that is one positive side of new tecnique of shooting.

2. What about the Eagles themselves? Do they come off as realistic to you? How would you compare these Eagles with those we saw in LOTR?

They come off very realistic to me and they are also one major reason why this scene was so great and emotional to me. Eagles in LOTR were always like godly creatures to me, and seeing them again in AUJ was just wonderful. I wasn't surprised that they were make better and more realistic then those in LOTR and that makes even a greater impact on whe whole scene.

3. Did you notice that the Carrock is shaped like a bear? Do you like this “little” detail?

Didn't notice that first, only when listening to director's commentaries. It is nice but not very important to me.


4. What did you think was going to happen to him? In case you hadn’t read the book before you saw the film, were you afraid he might die?

Since I have read the book I know for sure that Thorin wouldn't die, but I was a little surprised nontheless to see him in such bad shape. But despite all chances they make in movies I knew that killing him would be just too much for audience.


5. What kind of a spell do you think Gandalf is whispering? Could it be the same he uses on Pippin in ROTK after the incident with the palantír?

Probably though I must admit I am not very fond of this healing scene. That is probably because Thorin's unconscious is something completely different then Pippin's incident and also what was the point of all Thorin's injuries if he was healed a second later with a few words from Gandalf.


6. Did you believe Thorin was still discontented with Bilbo?

I certainly was.


7. What could have our burglar been thinking of at that moment?

Not again... I can do everything and he still won't be pleased having me in his company.


8. What kind of emotions does this moment create in you? What do you make of this turn of events?

That was a strong moment and a very emotional one that makes a good point for ending this movie. I was surprised first, especially because of Thorin's sudden change of behaviour but then I felt satisfied and happy for Bilbo who certanly didn't deserve such harsh words after his heroism in combat with Azog.


9. What do you think of the reactions of the others? Does someone’s reaction stand out from the rest for you?


As always I was watching Gandalf the most and he seems to be happy. Also the others react in similar way.


10. What was your reaction when you first saw the mountain in the distance?

It was so small that I didn't see it first but once I saw it I immediately knew what it represents. I knew at that point that they have survived their first obstacle - the Misty Mountains but only to counter a new ones as their journey continues.


11. What about that of the characters? How would you describe their response, let's say, in one word?

Positively surprised.


12. Why end the film with such an obviously ironic note?

I cannot helped myself but smile when heard those words. They are very optimistical but I knew that this is just the beginning of everything and I thought that they would later remember their words, knowing how wrong they were at this point.

13. Do you feel it was a good place where to end the first film?


It was a good place in my opinion. I like good happy endings and though I knew this is far from ending, it was a nice end of the first film since it also reflects the end of they journey through one part of Middle Earth.


14. Do you think this shot of the thrush flying across the lifeless land around Erebor was a deliberate move by the filmmakers to connect the first film to the second one titled The Desolation of Smaug or simply a coincidence?

Hard to say but it was nice to look closely at Erebor after it's destruction and finnaly see something of Smaug, though only the eye this time.


15. In your opinion, was this a great way to end the first film? What kind of alternative endings could you imagine?

It was. I have no ideas about alternative endings at the moment.


16. Does it make a good closing credit song (for a Middle-earth film)?

At the beginning I didn't like that song as it didn't sound very dwarvish to me, but know I like it much better and I think it is a good closing credit song. It reflects the point of this move like the others in LOTR.





BlackFox
Valinor


May 23 2014, 9:19am

Post #46 of 47 (65 views)
Shortcut
Thanks for the answers, Old Pilgrim! [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't think I've had the pleasure to see you on these boards before, though it looks like you've been here longer than I. Anyway, I'm glad you decided to join the discussion. Smile


"Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake." - Henry David Thoreau


Old Pilgrim
Rivendell


May 25 2014, 12:43pm

Post #47 of 47 (53 views)
Shortcut
It was very enjoyable. [In reply to] Can't Post

You created such a great discussion that I simply could not ignore it. Smile
I am here quite a long time already but I wasn't active for some months now though I was still reading threads from time to time.

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.