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Any teachers here?
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Starglass
Rivendell


Mar 13 2014, 3:41pm

Post #1 of 40 (304 views)
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Any teachers here? Can't Post

I'm currently getting my MAT in Spanish and will be certified to teach Middle and High School in about a year. I'm doing observations in a middle school now and doing my final student teaching this fall. I'm already starting to get nervous!

Just started this thread to hear from some other teachers- advice, stories, LotR references you made in the classroom, you name it!


(This post was edited by Starglass on Mar 13 2014, 3:42pm)


Dame Ioreth
Grey Havens


Mar 13 2014, 4:18pm

Post #2 of 40 (180 views)
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I'm not a teacher but I've been in the school system going on 18 years [In reply to] Can't Post

as a very active parent volunteer. I admire folks who go into teaching. My uncle was a teacher for over 30 years and my two sons want to become teachers.

From a parent POV, my advice is to keep an eye out for any resources you can use and that includes parents. It's harder in middle school and high school, but you'd be surprised at how many parents do want to stay active in their child's school.

My five children have had over 125 teachers so far and I can easily pick out the best of the best. They were the teachers who cared about the students learning, not memorizing. They set expectations for behavior in their classroom and stuck to them. They taught their students how to think not just regurgitate information. The most important thing? They truly enjoy teaching.

Good luck!

Where there's life there's hope, and need of vittles.
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings







Starling
Half-elven


Mar 13 2014, 5:23pm

Post #3 of 40 (179 views)
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Special needs teacher here [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been a specialist teacher for 14 years, and working with people with disabilities for about 25 years now. The kind of teaching I do is on the surface completely different to what a typical teacher does in the classroom, and it's very, very hands-on. But really, it's all about working with children to help them be the best that they can be, just like any teacher. For our children, the goals are different, and the steps are often tiny, but the learning for all of us is always meaningful and sometimes profound.
Some of the children I work with are under palliative care, and that brings its own special set of circumstances.

I'm in a management role in my school, so I have 20 children with a range of multiple disabilities to look after, as well as 20+ staff. Working alongside the children's parents and whanau is one of the biggest (and most rewarding and challenging) parts of my job.

My best advice to a new teacher? Never, ever stop learning: about your students, about yourself, and about teaching and learning as a craft.
(I was going to give the usual advice about 'having a life outside teaching', but I am a useless example of that and a very poor role model.)

And PS, I have been known to make the odd LOTR reference. A lot of our students are not the best at staying in the right place. I have been known to use the phrase, "You shall not pass!" on a fairly regular basis. "The way is shut..." is another favourite of mine. Laugh


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Mar 13 2014, 5:56pm

Post #4 of 40 (168 views)
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I wonder if you've heard this one: [In reply to] Can't Post

A colleague went into teaching and when she visited us a while after, she said she was given the most important piece of advice: "Don't smile until Easter*." I doubt you were told that with your school but I wonder if you've heard others saying it?

(*North Hemispherians: Our school year starts in late Jan/early Feb.)

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Mar 13 2014, 5:59pm

Post #5 of 40 (172 views)
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That was when I became disillusioned about high school. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
They taught their students how to think not just regurgitate information.


In fifth-form (age 15/16) English class I realised that those who did well in exams simply repeated what the teacher had told them. We weren't taught how to extrapolate information for ourselves.

I understand the system has changed a bit now. (This was - ah crikey - nearly 30 years ago now. I really shouldn't count back to my school days!)

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


(This post was edited by Ataahua on Mar 13 2014, 5:59pm)


Eruvandi
Tol Eressea


Mar 13 2014, 6:01pm

Post #6 of 40 (165 views)
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I'm not a teacher yet but... [In reply to] Can't Post

...I intend to become a teacher sometime in the not-too-distant future. I didn't even realize I wanted to be a teacher until a little over a year ago (I started volunteering as an assistant Sunday School teacher and fell in love with it) and being in my senior year now this revelation has come too late for me to change my degree program (BS in Interdisciplinary studies: Religion/ Business Marketing) without seriously pushing back my graduation date which I literally cannot afford to do. So I'm just going to focus my last year on taking almost nothing but teaching-related courses. So far I've taken Principles of Education, Learning Theory and Portfolio Development, Early Childhood Education Fundamentals, and I'll be starting a Developmental Psychology course on Monday.

I'm only learning about teaching preschool or elementary school and am therefore only taking courses related to those age groups, so I can't give you much advice specifically on Middle or High School. However, I have learned some helpful things that relate to teaching in general so I'll share what I can. Here are some basic "Teacher survival skills" that I recently learned and have already found useful (This is coming straight from my school notebook):

1. Be sure that you always keep yourself and your desk organized.
Plan ahead and prepare everything you need before you actually need it. It will help both you and your students have a sense of security/stability if you create a regular routine for the classroom so that you and they always know what's coming up next and can be ready for it.

2. Keep your classroom well managed.
At the very beginning of the year establish a few firm rules for your classroom. Just four or five basic standards of behavior is a good way to start. You will have to repeat the rules sometimes and that is perfectly ok. If someone challenges the rules, quickly and fairly correct it and move right along.

3. Be consistent
The students should never have to worry about you treating them differently/being more hard on them than usual because you're in a bad mood or having a bad day. Always make a conscious effort to stay upbeat, positive, and encouraging.

4. Get to know your students
Let your students know that you care about them as people. Learn about their unique likes/dislikes/family and whatever else is important to them. If you connect with them then they will want to learn from you.

5. Stop talking all the time
It is not necessary for you to ruin your voice by talking for every single minute of class time. Silence is ok. Plan quiet times, reading, work sheets and other things that will allow the students to work on their own and rest your voice for a little while.

6. Be self confident AND self critical in a healthy manner.
Be confident in yourself and your abilities as a teacher, but also be willing to analyze yourself and look for opportunities to improve.

7. Keep learning.
Just because you are now a teacher doesn't mean you have an excuse to stop learning things yourself. Keep yourself up-to-date on new studies/theories related to teaching and learning and be involved in the teaching community. Also remember that your fellow teachers (especially the ones that are more experience than you) are excellent resources as well. Learn from them and don't be afraid to ask questions.


Well, that's all I've got for now. I hope it helps.Smile

"So fare thee well, my own true love
I'll think of you night and day
A place in my mind, you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I'm alone, far away from home
I'll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy's green shamrock shore"
--The High Kings


Starling
Half-elven


Mar 13 2014, 6:10pm

Post #7 of 40 (156 views)
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Let's just say [In reply to] Can't Post

You can pretty much determine the age of a teacher by whether or not they are:
a) unfamiliar with this phrase
b) familiar with this phrase or
c) practitioners of this 'advice' Laugh


Elanor of Rohan
Lorien


Mar 13 2014, 6:17pm

Post #8 of 40 (163 views)
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I am a teacher of English (foreign language) [In reply to] Can't Post

my students are aged 11-14 (they say it's the worst age, but I disagree, of courseWink).

Maybe a few tips:
- you are the chief, they must respect you all the time, every time.

- the 1st key word is motivation: clear explanations, but you must always remember not to be boring. Never. Find interesting topics (of course after you have finished grammar Smile). By the way, interesting topics for them do not necessarily mean interesting topics for you and vice versa, so try and keep the balance right, as much as you can.

- the 2nd key word is caring. They must know from the start that you care for them, always. If you haven't laughed with them at least once, it has not been a good day. You judge the performance, not the people, if you understand what I mean.

- be professional, even the worst students can sense if you are at a loss, so a good professional knowledge, especially when teaching a foreign language is paramount - and the English pronunciation can be quite tricky sometimes!!

And, of course, in the final year, I always try to introduce them to Tolkien which is not so popular in my country as in the English-speaking world.

To cut it short, it can either be the best job in the world, or the worst nightmare. But I think you can imagine whose side I am on
Heart


CuriousG
Valinor


Mar 13 2014, 7:06pm

Post #9 of 40 (153 views)
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Don't smile until... [In reply to] Can't Post

In my 1st year of teaching, I read the book "Don't Smile Until Christmas," which would mean not the 1st half of the year, but only too late for me. I read it while very depressed after teaching for only 1 month, having been convinced that my passion for my students to learn would be all that I needed for classroom management. It didn't help that I was in Peace Corps, where the mission is to make people like Americans, not hate them, so that made it even harder to be strict in the classroom.

That book was full of stories of 1-year teachers who, having recently been students themselves, had tried so hard to win over their students by being fair, flexible, and friendly and not mean like the teachers we all hated in our past. The lesson is not to be harsh and mean, but to not, for a second, try to be friends with your students. It's the kiss of death. You have a job, they have a job, you are the Authority, and you have to make and enforce rules. I put that into practice my 2nd year of teaching, and things were great. The idea is start out strict and loosen up gradually over time. Starting out soft and trying to get strict later just doesn't work. They've seen you at your softest and know they can push you around.

Of course all the advice I had from experienced teachers to "be tough at first" just sounded like it came from embittered, bad teachers. Turns out they were right. It's all about moderation, of course, and you don't want to be a Nazi, but you don't put up with disrespect either.

Aside from preventing classroom chaos, my lessons always went best if I could relate the subject to the real world. It was algebra, so it wasn't always easy, but when I made the connection, you could see lights go off in students' heads. I was also honest with students, and they seemed to appreciate that. "Will we ever use second-degree parametric equations in real-life?" "Probably not, but you need them for the test, and you need good grades to get into a university and get a good job, so learn them for that reason." They'd nod and go ahead and study.

My 2 cents.


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Mar 13 2014, 7:29pm

Post #10 of 40 (142 views)
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If only our maths teachers had been that honest. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
"Probably not, but you need them for the test, and you need good grades to get into a university and get a good job, so learn them for that reason."



Their answers of 'just do as you're told' never went down well. These days, I think of it as exercising all the muscles of your brain - just as a runner also lifts weights and does other exercises to support those muscles that he/she really needs for their sport, we need to exercise all of our brain to do even better in the classes that we're focusing on for future careers.

As for teachers, one English teacher I had scared the living heck out of her students: she had the quietest class and I got my best grades in that year, but she also (unintentionally) squashed my creative writing bent for about the next eight years. My English teacher the year previously was a bit nutty, very flexible and not a disciplinarian - I got my worst marks at the end of his year.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Escapist
Gondor


Mar 13 2014, 7:41pm

Post #11 of 40 (140 views)
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When you get your first job [In reply to] Can't Post

pay close attention to what the other teachers in your pod do. There is probably a reason for it. It is in your best interest to be on very good terms with them - which often means harmonizing with them as much as possible.

If all the world's a stage then who's writing the script?


Dame Ioreth
Grey Havens


Mar 13 2014, 8:06pm

Post #12 of 40 (127 views)
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I love this advice! [In reply to] Can't Post

My daughter is trapped in a classroom (4th grade 9-10 year olds) with an amazingly ineffective teacher who cannot control her class. She's not new to the profession either, but this particular group of kids just smelled the ineffectiveness at the beginning of the year.

Just from what I've heard from my kids' friends and their parents, the best students will appreciate being able to learn in an environment that is free from distraction and those students who truly need extra help will be heard. The ones who are the potential troublemakers will get a lesson in how the real world works - they will not get to be the center of attention and need to excel in other ways to get what they want.

Three months to go in that class and then my daughter is free. It's my last year in the elementary school. After 18 years of volunteering, you can bet I'm insisting on the best teacher for her next year. I've never pulled rank but I will now. She's paid her dues this year. What a nightmare.

Where there's life there's hope, and need of vittles.
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings







Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Mar 14 2014, 1:09am

Post #13 of 40 (132 views)
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Me, but my students are adults. [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been teaching math at a community college for 30 years.

One piece of advice is to go to the bathroom whenever you get a chance, because you can't leave in the middle of class.

If you can't get them to quiet down, I've found that a vuvuzela works.

When someone's cell phone goes off, the punishment is that the class has to watch me dance to the ringtone.

But that's for adults; I think younger students might be completely different.

I carry my coffee cup to class with me, not because I'm thirsty, but because after I ask a question, I can take a long slow drink while I give them the chance to think of the answer.

Our college algebra book has a problem in it about Gandalf constructing a crystal ball. I tell them that everyone knows *Gandalf* doesn't make crystal balls. *Feanor* does that.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



(This post was edited by Aunt Dora Baggins on Mar 14 2014, 1:11am)


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Mar 14 2014, 1:14am

Post #14 of 40 (117 views)
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Yep, about being honest. [In reply to] Can't Post

Sometimes after we've done some pre-calculus, I tell them "You're not going to go home and balance your checkbook with this. This is so you can get ready for calculus, and if you're not going on, you probably won't use this. But the more math you take, the more doors you will open for yourselves."


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



squire
Valinor


Mar 14 2014, 1:42am

Post #15 of 40 (114 views)
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Learn by doing [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm in my 5th year of teaching high school kids. I have generally found that some kind of 'activity' makes a lesson work better. Obviously it has to be appropriate, manageable, and in line with the learning goals of the lesson, so creativity is called for. Many teachers find this daunting and many administrators find it distracting. Still, when I test my current students, I generally find better retention of material that was learned by doing than was learned by reading or by listening.

And easy does it on the videos.



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Footeramas: The 3rd & 4th TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion and NOW the 1st BotR Discussion too! and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


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Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Mar 14 2014, 3:19am

Post #16 of 40 (123 views)
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You are AWESOME! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
If you can't get them to quiet down, I've found that a vuvuzela works.

When someone's cell phone goes off, the punishment is that the class has to watch me dance to the ringtone.



Sly

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Escapist
Gondor


Mar 14 2014, 11:27am

Post #17 of 40 (94 views)
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I'm going to say that it depends a little bit [In reply to] Can't Post

on the kids in your room and the mode of the school and teaching pod that you find yourself in. As one teacher I worked with has said "you are only as good as the kids you have".

If all the other teachers are absolutely strict and maintain pindrop silence in their rooms and you are the teacher that allows group work, the kids might confuse the difference as a weakness (and so might the teachers - and very likely the administrator). If none of the other teachers care that much about the little stuff and kids are bouncing between rooms without passes and chit-chatting freely and the cell phone policy is not really strong or enforced in most of their other classrooms and you are the guy who tries to maintain absolute decorum and order and control (no phones whatsoever), then you probably have some battles on your hands that may not be worth it (and they will probably start to hate your class - whereas if all their classes had been that strict, it wouldnt' stand out to them so much as a negative).

I have been subbing across 4 distracts this last year and I can tell you, there is a wide amount of variety out there, but teachers who survive tend to form cooperative / cohesive pods and come to agreement with each other about expectations (much like parents do in the home) and I think that consistency is pretty huge (not to mention the fact that there are ways to make things really hard for you if you get on the wrong side of a pod like this).

If I had my own classroom, I would venture to say that how strict I would be would almost depend on the kids I had. I taught one year in highschool before teaching several years in several community colleges (one for 3 years full time and others as an adjunct) (and before that I was a TA across many different math subjects and a student teacher in 3 different subjects for 2 different teachers). The year that I taught HS, I was at 2 different schools. At one school there were strict and systematic rules that everyone followed and all the kids knew concerning errata like coats and phones in class and things. No problem. I just plugged in. That school was pretty easy to harmonize with and get along in. Kids did really well in my class.

At the other school, there was kind of a word going around that there would be cuts, and in fact, one guy did get cut that year (and I left for teaching community college). The first semester, before that word had come down the pipeline, I let the kids earn some trust with me and had a system and the worst complaint was from an aide in the room about someone who was using a gameboy so stealthily that no one else noticed except her because she was staring at him in the seat behind the student she was supporting all day every day. But then, the next semester, I found it hard to harmonize with the other teachers because they would say one thing and do another (and at the time I hadn't thought to watch what they were doing more than what they were saying). Some teachers were not having detentions supported by their administration (which, by the way, got fired within a few years of all this). There were lock downs school wide so that kids couldn't use the bathroom at all during classes. The new kids that got added to my room were all kids who had just failed first semester - in a wide variety of classes. My take on HS is that you almost have to try to fail (ie not doing work, not showing up etc.). When I tried to start off strict again, it was hard because it went back on the trust and rapport I had started with the old kids. But I knew I had to do it because the new kids hadn't earned that same trust with respect etc. In fact, with that group, it probably never would have happened because many of them viewed the school and system as kind of an enemy and it was a little bit like a glorified detention hall that I was teaching. Just being strict all the time (in accord with the other teachers the same kids deal with and the administration compares you to), is the easiest and safest. Although, the group I had the first semester was fine with the slightly less strict and more friendly approach, the group I had the second semester couldn't handle it and I really should have started out the year with a system and approach that could handle both right from the start - in my case, I didn't know what I would be getting that second semester - so I should have erred on the side of strictness, at least I think so in hindsight (but maybe I wouldn't have had such luck with the first semester group if I had done that - it's hard to say!) On the other hand, with enough disharmony in a school, kid behaviors will feed off of that like sharks sensing blood ... I don't know if there would have been anything better I could have done that second semester than to be as strict as possible (except to key in more on what other teachers were doing than on what they were saying).

If possible, I am hoping to go with middle school some time soon full time. One of my favorite things about Middle Schoolies is that they are not too old or too cool most of the time to have fun with games - either games as rewards or games as part of a lesson. I am a huge fan of games of all kinds. I love teaching middle school!

I enjoyed teaching HS and it was rewarding to pull several kids out of the fire (being the new teacher I systematically had kids that were at risk of failing / had a history of failing). They are also reaching more of their potential by that age which makes the topics more interesting to teach. But I just don't know what to say to a 16/17/18 year old who looks at me in my face and says "I'm just going to get my GED". I am expected to try to override that kid's decision, and haven't figured out how to do it. They are getting to be old enough to decide, and yet, I am held responsible for that decision. It's a tough spot to be in that I haven't figured out. In Middle School there are not quite so many that have bailed out on the whole system like this.

If all the world's a stage then who's writing the script?


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Mar 14 2014, 4:51pm

Post #18 of 40 (81 views)
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I'm not a teacher, but I can be taught :D [In reply to] Can't Post

GOOD FOR YOU!!! I administer the teacher certification testing for future teachers in Michigan, so I know that all the years of hard work coming down to one day of testing is very stressful! Best of luck and GET AN "A"!!!!


:)



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I'm SO HAPPY these new films take me back to that magical world!!



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Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Mar 14 2014, 5:29pm

Post #19 of 40 (76 views)
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I don't know about kids, but that dancing really works with adults. [In reply to] Can't Post

The whole class is laughing, and the culprit is red-faced and trying desperately to turn off the phone. Plus I get to dance for a bit, which is fun for me. The only thing is that it's become a pavlovian response for me. If I'm in a meeting or some other place and a cell phone goes off, I can't help dancing.

I bought the vuvuzela when I had a particularly rowdy class. Yelling only made me angry, but blowing that horn made me laugh, which is a good thing.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Starglass
Rivendell


Mar 14 2014, 5:58pm

Post #20 of 40 (68 views)
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I'm so happy to hear [In reply to] Can't Post

your opinion as an involved parent. I'm also glad to hear that many parents still want to be involved at the secondary level. Unfortunately, I've seen students in my limited experience where that's not the case and it often shows.

I agree with the importance of not just memorizing material. It happens far too much nowadays with testing and all. I hope that with Spanish I'll have more freedom to design my own curriculum and be creative with the students.


Starglass
Rivendell


Mar 14 2014, 6:02pm

Post #21 of 40 (67 views)
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Thanks for sharing! [In reply to] Can't Post

I enjoyed hearing about your experiences as a special needs teacher. I took a special education class last fall and volunteered in a resource room with some students. It was very rewarding. I learned a lot about myself and had to adjust to fit each students' needs which I'm sure will help me in the future.

Love the LoTR references! Smile


Starglass
Rivendell


Mar 14 2014, 6:07pm

Post #22 of 40 (65 views)
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I didn't know that I wanted to be a teacher right away either [In reply to] Can't Post

My undergrad was in Psychology and I picked up a double major in Spanish since I just loved it so much. I ended up TAing in a Spanish class and I enjoyed it so much that I wanted to look into teaching for grad school. My school actually just added the masters program the year the I graduated so the timing was perfect.

Thanks for sharing the tips! I've heard/experienced some of them before, but it was very helpful to see them again!
Best of luck in your future education and teaching endeavors! Smile


Elwen
Lorien


Mar 14 2014, 6:15pm

Post #23 of 40 (65 views)
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Ok. You are way cooler than any teacher I ever had. [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm jealous.

 photo b46d46c9-4c74-4ab7-b020-9f8681a9c904_zps24eb4def.jpg
Even elves love a Friday Fiesta


Draupne
Forum Admin / Moderator

Mar 14 2014, 6:50pm

Post #24 of 40 (70 views)
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Yes, I am staring at a heap of physics papers [In reply to] Can't Post

that needs grading.

I know that once I start it'll go really fast, but I'm not sure I want to start tonight.

Not a lot of LOTR-references, there's a Harry Potter reference in the Physics test. Come to think of it, maybe I should come up with something from LOTR til Friday. I think it might be wasted on some of them, so it'll have to be physics and not math.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Mar 14 2014, 6:56pm

Post #25 of 40 (65 views)
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I'm always tempted to follow my dad's advice [In reply to] Can't Post

and throw the tests down the stairs. The ones that land on the top step get an A, second step B, and so on. He says you can get a nice normal distribution that way. But neither he nor I ever actually did it.


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"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
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"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
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