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It's the ohmygosh it's Tuesday reading thread!
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acheron
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 12:28pm

Post #26 of 55 (132 views)
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agreed from what I remember [In reply to] Can't Post

It's been decade(s) since I read any Brooks, but as a teenager I did enjoy the Shannara sequels. I seem to remember liking the second series a lot. (There was a trilogy -- Sword, Elfstones, Wishsong -- then a four-book series after that, right? That I can't remember the name of any of them.)

What I really liked as a YA reader was Running with the Demon. Its sequels too a bit but especially that one.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


acheron
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 12:34pm

Post #27 of 55 (133 views)
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I should seek that out again [In reply to] Can't Post

I know I read it once probably almost 20 years ago as well (geez, when did I get old?). I'm familiar enough with the short story and I've certainly read it much more recently. But I don't remember the novelization at all.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


acheron
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 12:37pm

Post #28 of 55 (137 views)
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I enjoyed the ITV Cadfael series [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm pretty sure my parents read most of the books, and we would watch the TV series together (looking it up it looks like it was produced by ITV in the UK; I'm pretty sure we saw them on PBS here and/or got videos from the library). I enjoyed the TV series a lot (love anything with Derek Jacobi!), but never read any of the books. My parents still have all the books, I should give them a go sometime.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 3:17pm

Post #29 of 55 (116 views)
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My favorite Banks book is non-fiction [In reply to] Can't Post

Raw Spirits, about him going around to every whisky distillery in Scotland. So much fun! I was very sad when he died recently.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 3:18pm

Post #30 of 55 (119 views)
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I haven't read any of the Shannara books [In reply to] Can't Post

What I've heard is what others in this thread are saying, that the first one or two are derivative of Tolkien. Please let us know what you think after you read it/them.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 3:19pm

Post #31 of 55 (120 views)
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I love it! [In reply to] Can't Post

I hadn't really looked at the story this way, but you're right. The Fool of a Took was quite a mover and shaker, wasn't he? Great analysis, thanks!




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 3:21pm

Post #32 of 55 (123 views)
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Oh dear [In reply to] Can't Post

I do hate it when favorite characters bite the dust. I was devastated by the loss of Lt. Bush in the Horatio Hornblower series, for example.

Thanks for the warning. I don't read books with graphic rape scenes, end of story, full stop.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 3:26pm

Post #33 of 55 (125 views)
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The TV series started out strong, IMHO [In reply to] Can't Post

And then went downhill as the stories deviated further and further from the original texts. (Hm---I think I've heard comments like that on this board before....)

I really, really liked Sean Pertwee as the under-sheriff, Hugh Beringar, in the first four episodes. The actors who played the part in the later episodes were perfectly good actors, but struggled with the scripts losing Hugh's original character (intelligent and capable) and turned him into a cardboard obstacle for Cadfael. Jacoby is brilliant, though. He always is.

I personally feel that Peters got into her stride with the later books. I like One Corpse Too Many, because it introduces Beringar, but there's some unfortunately rough writing in that one. YMMV of course. Yes, give the books a try!




elaen32
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 4:26pm

Post #34 of 55 (119 views)
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Yes, I agree Lily [In reply to] Can't Post

I think the problem with later episodes in the series was that they kept merging elements from 2 or 3 of the books, rather than just using individual books. Agree with you about Hugh B also- by the final episodes he was very incorrectly portrayed as Cadfael's adversary rather than his friend. I enjoyed reading all the books- The Virgin in the Ice was a particularly good one. I could imagine a younger RA as Olivier in a dramatization of that one!Smile


Is there a Tolkien topic that you have wanted to look into more deeply and write about your thoughts on it? If so, we'd like to hear from you for the next TORn Amateur Symposium- coming in November. Happy writing!



elaen32
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 4:32pm

Post #35 of 55 (116 views)
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Have to say that I really disliked Pillars of the Earth [In reply to] Can't Post

The portrayal of the real historical characters and events were pretty inaccurate. And, like you, I found the ott evilness of the villain too much. For an enjoyable, fictional but accurate account of that period, I prefer Sharon Penman's book, " When Christ & His Saints Slept"


Is there a Tolkien topic that you have wanted to look into more deeply and write about your thoughts on it? If so, we'd like to hear from you for the next TORn Amateur Symposium- coming in November. Happy writing!



Belegdir
Bree


Jan 9 2014, 4:36pm

Post #36 of 55 (104 views)
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I'll have to pick that one up [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been to a few distilleries in Scotland so I'd like to read what he had to say.


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 4:54pm

Post #37 of 55 (104 views)
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Ooooh! [In reply to] Can't Post

A young RA as Olivier! The description in the book is so vivid I can see him definitely see him playing the part. Thanks for putting such a nice image in my head. Smile




Elberbeth
Tol Eressea


Jan 9 2014, 4:59pm

Post #38 of 55 (109 views)
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The sequel to Pillars of the Earth (World Without End) [In reply to] Can't Post

is, IMO, much better.

"There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark."


Tintallë
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 5:17pm

Post #39 of 55 (105 views)
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I have never understood the popularity of that book. . . [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't believe it's particularly accurate historically and it is extremely brutal. I read it but I have absolutely no inclination to read it again, and I bypassed the opportunity to watch the miniseries without a second glance.

Oddly I do enjoy the Song of Ice and Fire books, which are also brutal, quite graphic and full of political intrigue - just like Pillars of the Earth. Hmmmm. . .


Brethil
Half-elven


Jan 9 2014, 9:12pm

Post #40 of 55 (93 views)
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Agreed, and what a lovely idea! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I think the problem with later episodes in the series was that they kept merging elements from 2 or 3 of the books, rather than just using individual books. Agree with you about Hugh B also- by the final episodes he was very incorrectly portrayed as Cadfael's adversary rather than his friend. I enjoyed reading all the books- The Virgin in the Ice was a particularly good one. I could imagine a younger RA as Olivier in a dramatization of that one!Smile
I read quite a lot of the books (after I had watched the series) and though they were very fast reads I did enjoy them.


Have an idea relating to the world of JRR Tolkien that you would like to write about? If so, the Third TORn Amateur Symposium will be running in the Reading Room in March, 2014. We hope to see you there!





Dame Ioreth
Grey Havens


Jan 9 2014, 9:53pm

Post #41 of 55 (88 views)
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Oh my , yes! [In reply to] Can't Post

RA as Olivier.... Smile

I read the entire series as it came out and then tried to collect them all. They rarely show up in our library used book shelves or in our local used book store so folks must love to reread them, as I do.

I have Brother Cadfael's Herb Garden. This spring I want to start my own herb garden. Just trying to figure out how to keep the deer away.

Where there's life there's hope, and need of vittles.
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings







Silverlode
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jan 9 2014, 10:33pm

Post #42 of 55 (91 views)
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In addition... [In reply to] Can't Post

I believe Edith Pargeter (Ellis Peters was her mystery nom-de-plume) passed away midway through the making of the series, and I always felt it really went steeply downhill at that point, lacking her input and restraint. I loved Sean Pertwee's take on Hugh Beringar (even if he was a bit too tall...Wink) but he couldn't return for the second series because he was already committed to something else. I really can't stomach the later episodes when they turned Hugh into the clueless sidekick and pointless opposition he never was and started messing around too much with the plots. One of the joys of Hugh and Cadfael's friendship was the equality and mastery in their own spheres which made them so complementary. A stupid Hugh is even worse than a stupid Dr. Watson (another thing I abominate).

I do love the Cadfael books as well as Edith Pargeter's historical novels like The Heaven Tree trilogy and The Brothers of Gwynedd quartet. She had a great talent for writing which gives a feel for the period and makes it come alive but never becomes so archaic and dense that it bogs down the modern reader.

Silverlode

"Dark is the water of Kheled-zâram, and cold are the springs of Kibil-nâla, and fair were the many-pillared halls of Khazad-dűm in Elder Days before the fall of mighty kings beneath the stone."



(This post was edited by Silverlode on Jan 9 2014, 10:35pm)


elaen32
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 10:40pm

Post #43 of 55 (82 views)
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I'm glad.... [In reply to] Can't Post

that I seem to have made quite a few of us very happy with this idea!Smile I cannot remember now which came first, reading about Olivier and then seeing RA and connecting the two or vice versa.
Good luck with your herb garden Ioreth!


Is there a Tolkien topic that you have wanted to look into more deeply and write about your thoughts on it? If so, we'd like to hear from you for the next TORn Amateur Symposium- coming in November. Happy writing!



elaen32
Gondor


Jan 9 2014, 10:49pm

Post #44 of 55 (79 views)
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I agree completely Silverlode!// [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Is there a Tolkien topic that you have wanted to look into more deeply and write about your thoughts on it? If so, we'd like to hear from you for the next TORn Amateur Symposium- coming in November. Happy writing!



One Ringer
Tol Eressea


Jan 9 2014, 11:16pm

Post #45 of 55 (76 views)
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Starting Stephen King's 'Different Seasons' again. [In reply to] Can't Post

I had started reading it a couple months back when I got it for my birthday, but at the time I realized I was in need of a break from King (I had just read 'It' over the course of a month and a half). I only got twenty odd pages into the Shawshank Redemption, and am currently retreading them. So far I gotta say it's refreshing to read some King that's very drama based. Although most of his work revolves around his characters, there's always that horror or mystery hanging overhead. Reading something more down-to-earth is a nice way to come back into the world of Stephen King. I'm most looking forward to reading The Body. Smile

"You do not let your eyes see nor your ears hear, and that which is outside your daily life is not of account to you. Ah, it is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all; and if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain."


Kim
Valinor


Jan 10 2014, 3:43am

Post #46 of 55 (77 views)
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Percy Jackson [In reply to] Can't Post

So, I've just finished the last couple of books in the latest series, The Mark of Athena and The House of Hades. A friend of mine got me started reading these, kind of Harry Potter crossed with ancient Greek mythology, and while I've enjoyed the series, I find these too succumbing to the "epic" epidemic. Everything gets bigger - bigger monsters, end of the world etc. It just gets kind of exhausting after a while. I think there's one more book in the series, which I will probably read just to wrap up the story, but after that, probably not. This is actually a problem I have with a lot of fantasy series - they just keep ratcheting up the stakes, separating the heroes with ever more dangerous quests and such. I think I just need a nice quiet mystery.


Also, still working my way through The Woman in White, so am going to try to go back to that and see if I can finish out the story.


Brethil
Half-elven


Jan 10 2014, 4:03am

Post #47 of 55 (78 views)
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I liked that book too Elaen [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
For an enjoyable, fictional but accurate account of that period, I prefer Sharon Penman's book, " When Christ & His Saints Slept"
Ages since I read it though, but I really liked it. Something you could really get your teeth into.


Have an idea relating to the world of JRR Tolkien that you would like to write about? If so, the Third TORn Amateur Symposium will be running in the Reading Room in March, 2014. We hope to see you there!





Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 10 2014, 4:28pm

Post #48 of 55 (62 views)
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Yes, exactly [In reply to] Can't Post

Pertwee as Hugh, and Freeman as Watson, and we're good to go!




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 10 2014, 4:29pm

Post #49 of 55 (55 views)
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King certainly has an impressive body of work [In reply to] Can't Post

Personally, I enjoy his essays on writing.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Jan 10 2014, 4:31pm

Post #50 of 55 (58 views)
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A good series.... [In reply to] Can't Post

...I say, having only read the first couple of books. I'm sorry to hear it's succumbing to the epic bug, like so many others. It could be the publisher is pushing that aspect on the author. However, there's that aspect of human nature---you see it most vividly in sports, I think---where you always have to top the previous record.



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