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It's the new DoS trailer reading thread!

Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 2:16pm

Post #1 of 24 (212 views)
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It's the new DoS trailer reading thread! Can't Post

Of course the first thing I did this morning was dart over to the Hobbit board and watch the new trailer a couple of times. Whew. Okay.

Oh yeah---reading thread!

I've been reading bits and pieces of several books: Murder and Mystery in the Highlands, by Francis Thompson. The Supernatural Highlands, also by Francis Thompson. The Jacobites and the Supernatural, by Geoff Holder. And, without a woo-woo element, The Appin Murder, by Seamus Carney. And I've started The Legacy of Rome: Scotland's Roman Remains, by Lawrence Keppie.

I always enjoy stories of ghosts, second sight, water-horses, and the like, and am particularly amused (I suppose "amused" is the word) in the Jacobites book by the legends that have grown up around the original historical events. There seem to be no ghost stories about the Appin Murder, oddly enough, although Stevenson certainly did a superb job fictionalizing the events in his Kidnapped and its sequel, Catriona.

It remains to be seen how I'm going to track from the Jacobite rebellions of the 17th and 18th centuries back to the Roman frontier in Scotland. Stay tuned Wink

What have you been reading?




Na Vedui
Rohan


Oct 1 2013, 3:18pm

Post #2 of 24 (127 views)
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"The Planet in a Pebble" by Jan Zalasiewicz [In reply to] Can't Post

Traces the "life" of a pebble (and its components) found on Aberystwyth beach in Wales, right through from the Big Bang through planet formation, continental drift, glaciation and all the rest of it, to the likely end of the Earth. Absolutely boggled my mind. I'm always picking up pebbles and stones and wondering about them, but am pretty ignorant about geology and astronomy, so it was a real eye-opener


Angharad73
Rohan


Oct 1 2013, 3:31pm

Post #3 of 24 (127 views)
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'Memory of Flames' [In reply to] Can't Post

by Armand Cabasson. A Napoleonic thriller (I suppose, it might fall into that category), quite good if a little confusing at times. And even the English translation is so very French... (not as bad as the translation of one of his other books, though, which I had to give up on in frustration because the English was so very bad)

Now I am on to Rateliff's 'History of the Hobbit', which I find extremely interesting. My only quibble is that it is rather a hefty volume to carry around... Tongue

Your Scottish reading material sounds very interesting, Lily. I love ghost stories, true or otherwise, and now that autumn and winter are coming, it's definitely the time to read them...


AlassŽa Eruvande
Valinor


Oct 1 2013, 3:54pm

Post #4 of 24 (138 views)
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Still reading Georgette Heyer. [In reply to] Can't Post

I finished Grand Sophy and am on Frederica. But what I'm noticing, after about half a dozen of these stories, is a definite pattern. The heroine is always not particularly pretty, but has some gumption about her; is somewhat past her prime, or "on the shelf"; and is often referred to as "a remarkable woman". The man who ends up marrying her is older than she is, a nobleman plagued by grasping relatives, and always does his duty, no matter how distasteful it may be. The heroine helps him out of a major bind, or helps him see what a ninny he is. During the time it takes for her to help him, he realizes he can't live without her, and they get married and live happily ever after. Laugh

Which that's okay with me. Sometimes, not having to think very hard is what you need in a novel. Laugh



I am SMAUG! I kill when I wish! I am strong, strong, STRONG!
My armor is like tenfold shields! My teeth like swords! My claws, spears!
The shock of my tail, a thunderbolt! My wings, a hurricane! And my breath, death!

(This post was edited by AlassŽa Eruvande on Oct 1 2013, 3:57pm)


Elberbeth
Tol Eressea


Oct 1 2013, 3:58pm

Post #5 of 24 (129 views)
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The second book in the Dream of Eagles series [In reply to] Can't Post

by Jack Whyte, The Singing Sword. This novel continues the first-person account of Publius Varrus, who created the 'singing sword' from meteorite metal and which is given the name 'Excalibur.' It is a mesmerizing account of Roman Britain coming to an end with the deterioration of the Roman Empire. I absolutely love this stuff. Towards the end we have the birth of Merlyn (Britannicus) and Uther Pendragon (father of Arthur) on the same day, at the same time, forever joined in myth and legend. Can't wait to read the next one.

Am also reading Under the Dome, by Stephen King. I picked this up because we have watched the TV series, and enjoyed it in spite of its lack of credulity and now find that there is little connecting it to the book except the names of some of the characters! I am reading it in segments -- I don't read much King because I find it disturbing and not in a good way, but I have to admit he's a he!! of a writer.

"There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark."


RosieLass
Valinor


Oct 1 2013, 3:59pm

Post #6 of 24 (129 views)
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Jasper Fforde's "The Last Dragonslayer," same as last week. [In reply to] Can't Post

I've been kinda lazy and haven't been reading a whole bunch.

But we've met the dragon now. They still haven't established whether the continued existence of magic is connected with the existence of the dragon.

And the regular folks aren't a particularly attractive bunch...especially not the ones waiting to stake their claim in the land grab when the dragon finally expires.

As for the trailer, I've seen it just once so far, and only on my cell phone. So maybe I'll be more impressed when I see it on a bigger screen and can analyze it better. But I'm just "meh" so far, and the comments from other people aren't really reassuring me any. Frown

"BOTH [political] extremes are dangerous. But more dangerous are team fanboys who think all the extremists are on the OTHER side." (CNN reader comment)

It is always those with the fewest sensible things to say who make the loudest noise in saying them. --Precious Ramotswe (Alexander McCall Smith)


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 5:32pm

Post #7 of 24 (107 views)
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This sounds like an intriguing premise [In reply to] Can't Post

I enjoy geology, although I've never had any formal training in it, and this author's approach sounds very, well, approachable. Smile I'm now looking at some of my collection of pebbles with new interest.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 5:34pm

Post #8 of 24 (113 views)
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Ghost stories [In reply to] Can't Post

I've always enjoyed ghost stories, but only in the middle of the day! I can creep the heck out of myself reading them at night. I would assume there are some cool ghost/supernatural stories based on the Napoleonic Wars and Waterloo. If ever there was a haunted battlefield, you'd think Waterloo would be it.

(My husband just got back from France and one of the highlights of his trip was seeing Napoleon's eagles in Paris.)




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 5:35pm

Post #9 of 24 (112 views)
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True [In reply to] Can't Post

I find that with the Precious Ramotswe books. They follow a similar pattern, but that just makes them an even more comfortable read. Obviously Heyer found a winning formula and decided to stick with it!




Na Vedui
Rohan


Oct 1 2013, 5:37pm

Post #10 of 24 (103 views)
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Yes, it was very readable [In reply to] Can't Post

It's in paperback, so it didn't cost an arm and a leg either. Published by Oxford University Press.


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 5:37pm

Post #11 of 24 (115 views)
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Oooh... [In reply to] Can't Post

What a great idea for a novel! Since I'm nosing about in Roman Britain myself right now, I'll have to look out for this series.

Oddly enough, a writer-friend of mine wrote a very similar novel to Under the Dome at least 20 years ago, perhaps longer---and could never get it published. She just didn't have that magic touch like King, obviously.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 5:42pm

Post #12 of 24 (103 views)
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No need to make reading a job [In reply to] Can't Post

Just picking up a book when the spirit moves you to do so is a nice peaceful way of doing it.




Angharad73
Rohan


Oct 1 2013, 6:43pm

Post #13 of 24 (94 views)
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Waterloo ghosts [In reply to] Can't Post

Waterloo is said to be haunted by whole armies of ghosts, it seems, who hold their own reenactment of the battle, although there aren't a lot of real stories about, just rumours. Maybe the ghostly armies are just gathering strength for the 200th anniversary...

Oh, I love Paris and all the Napoleonic things there. Did your husband also go to see Napoleon's tomb (or supposed tomb, if some people are to be believed)? One of my favourite 'haunts' has to be Pere Lachaise cemetery, though. I have spent a good bit of time there looking up all the Napoleonic soldiers I could find.


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 6:55pm

Post #14 of 24 (91 views)
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Yes, he saw the tomb [In reply to] Can't Post

I've heard the rumors that the British poisoned Napoleon, or that the arsenic in the wallpaper killed him, and so forth, but there are also rumors that he's not buried in his tomb? Was he supposedly buried on St. Helena instead?

If I'd been there I'd have liked to look around Pere Lachaise, but I wasn't.




Angharad73
Rohan


Oct 1 2013, 7:04pm

Post #15 of 24 (87 views)
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Even worse... [In reply to] Can't Post

... I have once heard a rumour that the British removed Napoleon's body and buried him in Westminster Abbey... The ultimate insult.


acheron
Gondor


Oct 1 2013, 7:38pm

Post #16 of 24 (94 views)
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"This sword was forged from a fallen star. Antimony impurities make the blade surpassingly brittle and weak." [In reply to] Can't Post



For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 8:24pm

Post #17 of 24 (74 views)
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Whoa! [In reply to] Can't Post

You'd think that would cause a few upheavals in the British graves already there, too!




Annael
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 9:01pm

Post #18 of 24 (71 views)
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The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss [In reply to] Can't Post

second in the Kingkiller Chronicle. I have to read this book very slowly, there's SO MUCH going on, so much detail, so many threads . . . LOVING IT!

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Annael
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 9:04pm

Post #19 of 24 (78 views)
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she's got two basic types of heroine [In reply to] Can't Post

the slightly older, confident woman who needs the right man to appreciate her worth

and the very young & innocent, but true-hearted girl whose unspoiled nature gets the older, blase or embittered man to find joy in life once again.

However, Cotillion broke the mold; the heroine's very young & untried but so is the hero; they grow up together in a delightful way.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Oct 1 2013, 9:05pm

Post #20 of 24 (72 views)
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I think the only novel of hers I've read is "Royal Escape" [In reply to] Can't Post

I loved it, because that whole "king in exile" thing is a story I enjoy. But I haven't gone back and read any of her other books.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



AlassŽa Eruvande
Valinor


Oct 1 2013, 10:26pm

Post #21 of 24 (63 views)
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Oh, I haven't read Cotillion yet. [In reply to] Can't Post

It's in the queue, though!



I am SMAUG! I kill when I wish! I am strong, strong, STRONG!
My armor is like tenfold shields! My teeth like swords! My claws, spears!
The shock of my tail, a thunderbolt! My wings, a hurricane! And my breath, death!


Ciars
Rohan


Oct 2 2013, 6:55pm

Post #22 of 24 (40 views)
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It's a great book! [In reply to] Can't Post

I've just read it again and once more was immersed in Kvothe's world. The characters are so engaging and the multiple stories or chronicles? really keep the plot fresh, I'm still confused though by Bast and his motives. Can't wait for the third book to hit the shelves, especially as it will have to answer quite a few questions about the war, the exile and of course the seven!


Kim
Valinor


Oct 4 2013, 1:30am

Post #23 of 24 (25 views)
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11/22/63 [In reply to] Can't Post

by Stephen King. It's about a man who is shown a doorway to travel back in time from 2011 to 1958, and he is asked to try to stop the assassination of JFK. So he basically has to live in the past for 5 years leading up to it, and the story focuses on his experiences, as well as trying to track the movements of Lee Harvey Oswald. Very well written and interesting story. The ending was not what I expected, and am still pondering it. Good book to read on vacation as it's really long (almost 900 pages, thank goodness for my Kindle!)


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Oct 4 2013, 3:37pm

Post #24 of 24 (27 views)
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That would be a heavy book to carry around! [In reply to] Can't Post

I've heard good things about this book, but I have to confess that since I live in the Dallas area, we're hearing so much about the 50th anniversary of the assassination I'm not sure I'd enjoy reading an entire book about it. Unsure



 
 

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