Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Movie Discussion: The Hobbit:
Night worm / day worm

Lucky Luke
Bree


Sep 24 2013, 10:00pm

Post #1 of 11 (698 views)
Shortcut
Night worm / day worm Can't Post

Smaug's attack of Erebor and Dale in the prologue in AUJ was pretty nice, but for some reason it did not fit with what I imagined. Rereading the book, I finally realised the dragon attack in the book occured at night, which gave it a very different feel and atmosphere. The fact that the dwarves sing the verses of the Misty Mountain's cold describing that night attack ( "The winds were moaning in the night"), contrary to the film scene, is also odd. Anybody have an idea why that change was made? Are they keeping the night attack for Laketown? Another difference was that Smaug's attack in the film seemed less deadly : the survivors in the book were much fewer,


RosieBaggins
Rivendell


Sep 24 2013, 10:12pm

Post #2 of 11 (422 views)
Shortcut
I enjoyed the prolouge too. [In reply to] Can't Post

It did seem like Smaug's attack was less deadly in the film though.

My progress so far on my walk to Rivendell
I have traveled 71 miles
I have passed Buckleberry Ferry.
It is 2 miles to the next landmark.
I have 387 miles until I reach Rivendell.


Ziggy Stardust
Gondor


Sep 25 2013, 12:32am

Post #3 of 11 (341 views)
Shortcut
I enjoyed the prologue [In reply to] Can't Post

but perhaps it would've been more dramatic if it happened at night, like in the song. The only explanation I can think of for the change, is that during the day, more people in Dale would be out and about, making for potential victims. Yet if there were more survivors...I can't fathom it.


Rembrethil
Tol Eressea


Sep 25 2013, 1:24am

Post #4 of 11 (326 views)
Shortcut
Maybe I am weird.... [In reply to] Can't Post

But I had thought of the attack later in the day. I had always imagined "the mountain smok(ing) beneath the Moon' ,"the pines...blazing" , and 'winds...moaning in the night', as describing the scene when Thorin, Thrain, and Thror looked back at the mountain, from a distance. The embers from the attack still smouldered and smoke rose from the scorched pine trees, as wind whistled through the new formed wasteland.


Lucky Luke
Bree


Sep 25 2013, 1:43am

Post #5 of 11 (298 views)
Shortcut
Not weird... [In reply to] Can't Post

I had the same images, dark and atmospheric... Like in that beautiful song.

I think they might want to keep the night attack for Laketown in a way to differenciate the two scenes.

From a film perspective, the attack of Erebor and Dale was made difficult by the fact that they did not want to reveal Smaug. Hence filming a dragon more eager to hide and snooze in the tresor than to snack on dwarves!


Werde Spinner
Rohan


Sep 25 2013, 2:53pm

Post #6 of 11 (159 views)
Shortcut
I'm with you. [In reply to] Can't Post

I have a mental image of the Lonely Mountain giving a brief impression of the Mountain of Fire in Mordor - burning for hours, days even, as all the trees smoulder and smoke and a gray haze lit from beneath by red hangs about the land for weeks. Dale would be burning, too... Wouldn't that be the most horrible sight, even/especially at night? It'd be cold, desolate, and thanks to the smoke the most visible thing would be your burning home.

Gah, I need to stop thinking about burned Dale and Erebor as well. Giving myself too many feels. Frown

"I had forgotten that. It is hard to be sure of anything among so many marvels. The world is all grown strange. Elf and Dwarf in company walk in our daily fields; and folk speak with the Lady of the Wood and yet live; and the Sword comes back to war that was broken in the long ages ere the fathers of our fathers rode into the Mark! How shall a man judge what to do in such times?"

"As he ever has judged. Good and ill have not changed since yesteryear; nor are they one thing among Elves and Dwarves and another among Men. It is a man's part to discern them, as much in the Golden Wood as in his own house."


Rembrethil
Tol Eressea


Sep 25 2013, 4:22pm

Post #7 of 11 (131 views)
Shortcut
Well my thought was this... [In reply to] Can't Post

'Who else could compose such a bitter song?'

I have given the credit to the heirs of Durin, in my mind. Thorin seemed to me, the best one to wrote such a song, discounting Thrain and Thror because they died or disappeared too early IMO to pass on a song that was, seemingly, known by all the dwarves in Bag End. I also believe that the dwarves were more or less, scattered until Thorin united them, so that makes him a better candidate IMO.

All that time pounding on the anvil would give him opportunity to brood over this dour composition.


Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Sep 26 2013, 3:34pm

Post #8 of 11 (75 views)
Shortcut
Good point [In reply to] Can't Post



In Reply To


I think they might want to keep the night
attack for Laketown in a way to differenciate the two scenes.




That's a good idea--varying the time of day of the attacks so that they look different on the screen and the audience doesn't get bored with them.

There's always the possibility, too, that the "night" of the song is also metaphorical, as in the waning or bleakest time of Dwarven civilization, having lost their last great stronghold.



"Our perennial spiritual and psychological task is to look at things familiar until they become unfamiliar again."
--G. K. Chesterton



Werde Spinner
Rohan


Sep 27 2013, 12:50am

Post #9 of 11 (56 views)
Shortcut
Completely off the subject [In reply to] Can't Post

but I *love* your signature, Riven Delve! GKC is one of my trinity of favorite authors, right up there with Peter Kreeft and good ol' Professor Tolkien. I'm always excited whenver I see someone else quote him! Smile

"I had forgotten that. It is hard to be sure of anything among so many marvels. The world is all grown strange. Elf and Dwarf in company walk in our daily fields; and folk speak with the Lady of the Wood and yet live; and the Sword comes back to war that was broken in the long ages ere the fathers of our fathers rode into the Mark! How shall a man judge what to do in such times?"

"As he ever has judged. Good and ill have not changed since yesteryear; nor are they one thing among Elves and Dwarves and another among Men. It is a man's part to discern them, as much in the Golden Wood as in his own house."


Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Sep 27 2013, 1:18am

Post #10 of 11 (44 views)
Shortcut
He's a good one! [In reply to] Can't Post

I came across that particular GKC quote most recently in a book about cultivating thankfulness as a path to joy. Smile

I must confess, however, that I'm not crazy about the Father Brown books, which seem to be his most popular. Unsure Just not my cup of detective tea! Wink


"Our perennial spiritual and psychological task is to look at things familiar until they become unfamiliar again."
--G. K. Chesterton



Werde Spinner
Rohan


Sep 27 2013, 1:50am

Post #11 of 11 (52 views)
Shortcut
I collect GKC quotes like there's no tomorrow. [In reply to] Can't Post

*looks around before whispering guiltily* I also collect the little meme e-cards with pictures of him and his quotes written on them. And I collect his books. Wink

Ah, Father Brown. I actually like Father Brown - he's so adorable. But he is a very different sort of detective from the ones we are used to (i.e., the brilliant Sherlock Holmes), so I can see why some might not favor it as much. If you're up for philosophy, Manalive and The Man Who Was Thursday are also pretty good.

And, of course, there's always The Ballad of the White Horse. I know in one of Tolkien's letters he comments about helping Priscilla read it and observes that GKC really didn't know all that much about the cultures he was writing about in the Ballad, but I like it regardless. Lepanto is good, as well. I just like the way the words smash together and glitter in such a pretty and memorably way when GKC rhymes.

Sorry for going overboard on the GKC! It's just I find so few fellow fans...

"I had forgotten that. It is hard to be sure of anything among so many marvels. The world is all grown strange. Elf and Dwarf in company walk in our daily fields; and folk speak with the Lady of the Wood and yet live; and the Sword comes back to war that was broken in the long ages ere the fathers of our fathers rode into the Mark! How shall a man judge what to do in such times?"

"As he ever has judged. Good and ill have not changed since yesteryear; nor are they one thing among Elves and Dwarves and another among Men. It is a man's part to discern them, as much in the Golden Wood as in his own house."

 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.