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What movies (et. al.) did you watch last weekend?

Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 4:57am

Post #1 of 24 (219 views)
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What movies (et. al.) did you watch last weekend? Can't Post

which really means what visual, moving media have you watched recently or since the last time you posted?

Those in the US have one more day of our weekend but the rest of the world is back at work, I suppose. :-)

We went to see RED2 at the second run theater tonight. It was enjoyable. Although both my husband and I thought it might have been even more so if we had caught all the lines other people were laughing at. :-)

I also watched the third episode of George Gently (series 1). It's enjoyable.

We got Jack the Giant Slayer on DVD. It was okay. I like Nicholas Hoult (Warm Bodies) and it was fun to see Ian McShane and Stanley Tucci.

On TV, I am one of a handful of people watching Siberia. It moves a little slowly but it's right up my alley. And my other fav show, So You Think You Can Dance will be ending it's summer run in a few weeks.

Pacific Rim is playing at the second run theater and I may try to catch a second viewing of it this week.


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Starling
Half-elven


Sep 2 2013, 7:40am

Post #2 of 24 (143 views)
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Hey Magpie, have you seen Wah-Wah? And some 70's musings. [In reply to] Can't Post

I would definitely recommend Wah-Wah if you haven't already seen it. Your mention of Nicholas Hoult made me think of it. It's based on Richard E. Grant's childhood in Swaziland, which in many ways is so bizarre, you couldn't make it up. He wrote an interesting and very funny book called The Wah-Wah Diaries, about the making of the film.
Nicholas Hoult plays a young Richard E. Grant, and the wonderful Gabriel Byrne plays his father, who is in turns horrifying, funny and sad.

Anyway, I digress. Recently I have been watching some old stuff (when I really should be writing school reports), and stumbling upon a number of accidental 70's hairdos. You know how a lot of stuff made in the 70's, but set in other time periods, still looks 70's? It's often those hairstyles. Over the last week or so I've watched episodes of Little House on the Prairie (Dad's got the 70's hair going on), The Waltons (Dad's got the 70's hair again), and Mash (oh dear, BJ!).

I've also been revisiting a very good series called Holocaust, which was made in 1978. It stars a young Meryl Streep and also James Woods. I remember I was the only one in my class at school who was allowed to watch it (I was 11 at the time). I think it still stacks up very well. It's quite compelling so far, and there are parts I can remember from when I saw it all those years ago. But can I just say that one of the main characters (Dad) has the 70's hairdo going on. It does seem to be the man-do's that carry the 70's vibe the most.

Oh and I confess that I gave up on George Gently as I got a bit bored. I think I'll go back to Judge John Deed.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 2:59pm

Post #3 of 24 (125 views)
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The Great Gatsby (2013) and Psycho (the orginal) [In reply to] Can't Post

A week or two ago we watched the 1974 Great Gatsby, and then I read the book, and this week we watched the most recent remake. As in every version, the plot has the fascination of a train wreck. The characters are so awful, but you just can't look away. I was struck by the similarity to the plot of Wuthering Heights.

The acting was great in this version, and the visuals were very pretty. I'm still not sure how I feel about all the CGI. On the one hand, it did underscore the artificiality of Gatsby's life, and it was very beautiful. On the other hand, it was very obvious, and did pull me out of the movie.

I absolutely hated the rap music in the score. Ugh ugh ugh. That really pulled me out of the movie. It's a shame, because the movie would have been so much better without it.

And then Psycho. A few moths ago we watched the movie Hitchcock, a biopic about the making of Psycho, and it came out that Uncle Baggins had never seen the original. So we've been meaning to do that ever since, and finally got around of it. Neither of us is a fan of horror movies, but we both loved this one. I had seen it once before, and was saddened at the time that by cultural osmosis I already knew the plot twists. It would have been nice to have seen it without knowing. Uncle Baggins was less aware, but he admitted at the end that he thought he had been exposed to the plot too.

Anyway, we loved the acting, especially Anthony Perkins. What a genius actor! And of course the amazing editing that makes you think you're seeing more than you really are. What was really funny was that afterward we watched the extra "making of Psycho", and when they said it was shot in black and white, Uncle Baggins swore we had just seen it in color. But of course we hadn't.

One funny reaction: Uncle Baggins can't stand to waste water. After the first murder, when the shower is running on the body, he admitted shamefacedly "I just can't stand that the shower is running." Never mind that a murder just happened.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 3:05pm

Post #4 of 24 (118 views)
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I just put Wah-Wah in my Netflix queue [In reply to] Can't Post

thanks for the heads up.

I dearly loved The Waltons. Growing up, families on TV all looked too perfect for me to endure (since my family was WAY more um... let's say 'quirky'. I told my husband that being around my family was like being at a comedy club where each person had their own comedic personalities. 'comedic' is being kind, I think.) Anyhow, my family was never going to look like Beaver's or Donna Reed's. But The Waltons, they were real. I could identify with them.

As for Little House, I was much older when it came out so it held no allure for me. Michael Landon has always put out a weird, somewhat disturbing vibe for me (since his Bonanza days) and I never liked him nor LHotP (whose characters were too broadly drawn and which had way too much angst for me).

I sometimes catch MASH on local 'old time tv' channels and it's always worth watching any episode for the 15 or 20th time.

George Gently is very 'mild'. It doesn't stir any excitement in me but I find the characters just a tad bit more interesting than boring so I'll keep watching when there isn't anything else in my Netflix queue I want to bump up. I loved that first episode of Endeavour so much, I'm waiting for the rest to become available on Netflix.


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Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 3:14pm

Post #5 of 24 (124 views)
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Baz Luhrmann is an interesting director [In reply to] Can't Post

Moulin Rouge! is a movie I can watch over and over and over again. I suspect he handled The Great Gatsby in some similar ways ... including the inclusion of contemporary music which I loved in MR!

I've never been at all interested in writers like F Scott Fitzgerald or Sinclair Lewis. And the story itself (GG) doesn't interest me. I was sorry I didn't get a chance to see the movie at the second run theater near us. If for the visuals and Baz's touches if for no other reason.

Back in 1976, the Mister and I went on a three month circuit tour of the western half of Canada and the US and we stopped at Universal Studios (which was a fairly rinky dink tour at the time). We saw the house they used for exterior shots of the Bates Hotel in Psycho. The movie is like Casablanca where my 'knowing' of it is comprised as much by the jokes, references, and parodies I've seen of it than of the actual movie.


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Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 3:22pm

Post #6 of 24 (120 views)
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Fitzgerald [In reply to] Can't Post

The book wasn't the kind I usually read, and as I said, the characters are awful. But the writing is sooo yummy. Great swaths of it are like poems filled with light. That's another thing I didn't like about this movie version. The 1974 version used a lot of Fitzgerald's narration (which convinced me to try to the book, since I suspected that's where it came from.) This one didn't, and the narration felt a lot flatter.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Annael
Half-elven


Sep 2 2013, 4:15pm

Post #7 of 24 (129 views)
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Gunless [In reply to] Can't Post

This is a 2010 movie starring Paul Gross, who was the Mountie guy in "Due South." It didn't have great reviews, primarily from people who couldn't get past the idea of Gross playing a very different character, but I loved it. A gravelly-voiced American gunslinger with a bounty on his head escapes across the border & winds up in a little Canadian town where people think guns are for hunting food and are not only not combative, but friendly and interested in him as a person. Circumstances conspire to keep him in the town and he is gradually won over . . . until the bounty hunters show up too. A low-key comedy with a nice love story too. I liked it so much I watched it three times. Best scene: the locals discussing Aristotle.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 4:49pm

Post #8 of 24 (116 views)
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I haven't seen Due South but... [In reply to] Can't Post

I watched Paul in Slings and Arrows which I really liked, esp. the first season.

ha... went to put Gunless in my Netflix queue and it's already there. :-)


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cats16
Valinor

Sep 2 2013, 5:13pm

Post #9 of 24 (108 views)
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Also watched Psycho, and a sort of documentary on Cinerama [In reply to] Can't Post

Both were on TCM over the last day. I seem to catch Psycho about once a year, just by chance when it's on and I'm looking for something to watch.

I've seen Psycho many times. Yet there are still parts that are still creepy. Other parts, though, have aged. But I do not fault Hitchcock for this, as he was limited on his budget (paying for it himself!). He was being efficient and quick, and I think some shots suffered a little from this. All in all, just as good as ever.

The Cinerama picture was very interesting. It featured quite a bit of footage from the actual films made for that format. Some of the aerial shots are among the best I've seen. The documentary got a little dry at times, but picked up as footage from Cinerama starting to be shown. It was neat hearing about the filming process, as well as the entire period of Cinerama's popularity. It really was a phenomenon at the time.

Film history is a great topic to look at. With widescreen developing, we saw things like Napoleon (1927) do things no one dreamed to see. Then you develop technology, and out comes Cinerama and its copycats of the 50s/60s. This is the period of "immersive" cinema, with things like 3D and wrap around screens with better sound and picture quality coming to theaters around the country. Really, it's quite similar to the cinema of today.


(This post was edited by cats16 on Sep 2 2013, 5:15pm)


Kim
Valinor


Sep 2 2013, 5:46pm

Post #10 of 24 (106 views)
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Magic Mike [In reply to] Can't Post

Finally got around to seeing this - BORING! Ugh, I thought at least it would be entertaining Evil but no. Finally gave up and just fast forwarded to the end (which made the last couple of dance sequences kinda funny Tongue )

On a side note, I hit the Labor Day sales and got my new tv this weekend, and after it was all set up, guess what happened to be on tv? TTT! The opening sequence in the mountains looked absolutely beautiful. And then I had to watch AUJ again just to see how it looked. Fantastic! Smile


Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 6:20pm

Post #11 of 24 (102 views)
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We used to have a Cinerama theater in Minneapolis [In reply to] Can't Post

and I saw Lawrence of Arabia (in re-release) there.

Each ladies bathroom stall had its own sink. It was a beautiful theater. I saw something on Cinerama recently... I think it might have been a local history tv show on public tv.

http://discussions.mnhs.org/...ost-twin-cities-iii/

http://www.slphistory.org/...ry/coopertheater.asp

http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/930


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Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 6:21pm

Post #12 of 24 (106 views)
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I have a cute, blushy crush on Matt Bomer [In reply to] Can't Post

but I haven't heard enough good things about this movie to rent it.


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Starling
Half-elven


Sep 2 2013, 6:24pm

Post #13 of 24 (103 views)
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The Waltons [In reply to] Can't Post

When I casually mentioned at work a few years ago that I had it on dvd, there was a queue of people wanting to borrow it. One colleague watched the whole series with her children, and they absolutely loved it. She said it generated all sorts of interesting conversations, and her kids would be pestering her, asking to watch the next episode.
I loved it when I was growing up. I had a rural childhood and felt a sense of connection with that family, even though they were different to me in many ways. And it's still a very good show. The way it explores dilemmas and challenges is something I really like - things are not necessarily simple, or easily resolved, or resolved at all.

Little House is really just a bit of nostalgia for me, and I can't watch too much of it. I really cannot believe Laura's voice in the early episodes - she sounds like a wind up doll! I keep remembering Sawyer quoting 'Little House' wisdom to Kate in a crucial moment in LOST. Very weird.


Kim
Valinor


Sep 2 2013, 6:35pm

Post #14 of 24 (96 views)
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I like him too [In reply to] Can't Post

but you can barely tell he's in this movie. Probably best to stick with White Collar Wink


Magpie
Immortal


Sep 2 2013, 6:47pm

Post #15 of 24 (104 views)
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that's not hard to do. :-) // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


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Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Sep 2 2013, 7:17pm

Post #16 of 24 (103 views)
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Django Unchained. [In reply to] Can't Post

I finally got around to seeing it, and thanks to comments here I knew when to look away.

The best scene, by far, was the wannabe Klansmen arguing about not being able to see through their hoods. Then seeing Tarantino on screen and hearing a broad Aussie accent come out of his mouth was a big surprise!

As for the film ... nah. I know that Tarantino places his stories on a surreal plain, but in this film I just didn't care about anyone - not even Django's wife. The movie's really well made but it didn't go beyond superficial for me.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


cats16
Valinor

Sep 2 2013, 7:23pm

Post #17 of 24 (90 views)
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Sounds--and looks--like it was incredible! // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


cats16
Valinor

Sep 2 2013, 7:32pm

Post #18 of 24 (94 views)
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How about that ending... [In reply to] Can't Post

Quite self-aware that it's a Tarantino film, if that makes sense. The ending seemed to be a "crap we still have 20 *insert vulgarity* to say and a lot of fake blood left to use or Quentin won't be satisfied" moment. Wink

I've only seen it the one time in theaters. I remember sitting there thinking that the film went straight downhill after ***spoilers*** Dr. Schultz is killed.

On a slightly separate note: Is anyone else really looking forward to 12 Years a Slave?? Looks like it will be what Django could/should have been. The trailer had me sold instantly. Well, I was actually sold when I read the cast names...Cool There are several releases coming out this fall that I'm really looking forward to.


(This post was edited by cats16 on Sep 2 2013, 7:38pm)


dubulous
Rohan

Sep 2 2013, 7:32pm

Post #19 of 24 (95 views)
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Blue Jasmine [In reply to] Can't Post

I finally got to see Blue Jasmine and wow, even a couple of days later I'm still in awe of Cate Blanchett's performance.

I enjoyed the move as a whole, and it felt refreshingly real (down to the non-Hollywood ending) after all the summer block busters, re-makes and sequels, but it does rest heaivly on Cate's shoulders. I don't know how well the movie would stand without her stellar performance (and the help of an overall strong cast) but luckily we don't need to find out.


Tintallė
Gondor


Sep 2 2013, 7:34pm

Post #20 of 24 (92 views)
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Ditto about Cate in that movie! [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't usually like Woody Allen films and I'm not sure I would have liked this one either had it not been for Cate Blanchett's stellar performance. She was absolutely amazing and I hope she is recognized for this work.


Tintallė
Gondor


Sep 2 2013, 8:16pm

Post #21 of 24 (92 views)
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The Butler [In reply to] Can't Post

I liked it very much and thought it was quite well done, although many scenes were brutal and painful to watch. I grew up with all of it. I feel that I'm still growing up with it. I shed a lot of tears during this movie.

The leads were terrific. Forest Whitaker was stunning as Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland; here he is stunning as well, but with a persona that is pretty much the polar opposite of that role. He is quite an actor.

I really wish they had cast unknowns for the presidents. Robin Williams as Dwight Eisenhower was the most difficult to swallow, but I couldn't help thinking John Cusak was just Cusak imitating Nixon. I had the same feeling about Liev Schreiber playing Johnson. On the other hand, Alan Rickman made a pretty fine Reagan and Jane Fonda was perfectly believable as Nancy, although that bit of casting was incredibly ironic considering Fonda's politics, past and present.

I believe this film has gotten a lot of flack but I thought it reflected the times I grew up in very well, especially the deep-seated hatred and bigotry that I observed as a child but could interpret only when I was older.

I did make one horrible mistake, though - I went to a matinee populated by older (okay, just plain old) white people. Even that would have been ok had I not stopped in the restroom before leaving the theatre. Things I overheard there while a temporary captive on the porcelain throne made my hair stand on end. I felt both angry and despondent. I wanted to move to another country. The best I could do was dissociate myself from that situation as quickly as possible and be glad that I did not know those folks.

For me, Lee Daniels has crafted another thought-provoking emotional roller coaster that prods at my comfortable existence and forces me to think outside my personal box. I'm glad of it.


(This post was edited by Tintallė on Sep 2 2013, 8:18pm)


Ardamķrė
Valinor


Sep 5 2013, 1:01am

Post #22 of 24 (56 views)
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Tae Guk Gi (2004) and The Truman Show (1998) [In reply to] Can't Post

Tae Guk Gi - wow... I just don't even know where to start. This movie was fantastic. It's a Korean film about the war between North and South Korea. It was exceptionally good, and the only film to date that has made me cry. (Technically, there were no rolling tears, but my throat was raw and the tears were welling up in my eyes.) I don't know what else to say other than that it was very powerful, very moving, and incredibly emotional.

One thing to note, though, is that it's a very violent and gory movie. But I felt it appropriate due to it's depiction of the war.

The Truman Show - this was also good. It's about a guy whose whole life has been a reality show, and he doesn't know he's on it. It's quite an interesting premise, and it explores an interesting question of reality. Anyway, while not as amazing as Tae Guk Gi, it was still a good film.

THE SONG OF TUOR
Only the reeds were rustling, but a mist lay on the streams
Like a sea-roke drawn far inland, like a shred of salt sea-dreams.
'Twas in the Land of Willows that I heard th'unfathomed breath
Of the Horns of Ylmir calling - and shall hear them till my death.


Meneldor
Tol Eressea


Sep 5 2013, 1:48am

Post #23 of 24 (51 views)
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The Pirate, 1948 [In reply to] Can't Post

Gene Kelly dances, Judy Garland sings, Walter Slezak sleazes, all in glorious Technicolor accompanied by Cole Porter tunes. Speaking as a straight man, I'd have preferred Gene's tights to be a little less tight, but his dancing is
AMAZING! What an athlete! Judy Garland is adorable and very very funny. Acting is par for an MGM musical; moderately over the top. The musical numbers didn't do much for me, but the story was a fun little romp, parodying the classic pirate romance stories.


They that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters; These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep.


Kim
Valinor


Oct 10 2013, 8:29pm

Post #24 of 24 (64 views)
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A little something to brighten your day [In reply to] Can't Post

Just in case you haven't already seen this: http://insidetv.ew.com/...collar-season-4-dvd/

Cool

 
 

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