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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Reading Room:
Why inconsistency in Tolkien's canon is actually a good thing

News from Bree
spymaster@theonering.net

Apr 24 2013, 11:07pm

Post #1 of 22 (477 views)
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Why inconsistency in Tolkien's canon is actually a good thing Can't Post

The Doors of Night by John Howe The quest for Middle-earth canon. In some ways it always feels a bit of a Sisyphean endeavour.

You know the story of the mythological Greek king, Sisyphus, right?

for those who don't recall, Sisyphus was just too crafty for his own good. So the Greek gods, never tolerant of being made to look foolish, designed for him the most frustrating of punishments: Sisyphus was compelled to roll a huge boulder up a steep hill. Just before he could reach the top, it would roll back down, forcing him to begin all over again.

Consistency and canon in Tolkien always feels a bit like that -- something that hovers just out our of reach. More, the harder you push for it, the more it slips away from you.

The answer you seek isn't in quite The Lord of the Rings, so you start examining what Tolkien wrote in the published Silmarillion. But that's still too vague, so you delve into Unfinished Tales or the History of Middle Earth. You might find some hints, but they're at best fragmentary, or worse, the stories offer conflicting information!

Of course, as humans we feel compelled to seek consistency and place things within a coherent framework -- a framework that does not always exist.

Which is why people twist themselves into knots of logic to try and make sense of conflicting evidence of whether Balrogs do or do not have wings.

Or whether Galadriel departed Valinor with Feanor's rebels, or -- as Tolkien later preferred but never integrated into the Quenta Silmarillion texts -- left independently but at the same time.

Or... well, I could go on, but I'm sure you get the idea.

Tolkien canon has a natural limit...



The fact is that no matter how hard you work at it, no matter how many resources you consult, there's a limit to how consistent you can make canon. For some things in Arda, there is simply no single, definitive answer.

My take is that this inevitable inconsistency is not not only not necessarily bad, but actually a good thing. This may seem counter-intuitive, but I believe the uncertainty about "factual truth" works to increase our investment in the story.

Why? It makes us ask questions and discuss what "really" happened. we question and discuss not in the hope of a definitive answer, but as a means of discussing alternatives hypotheses.

It's worth considering that history -- or more precisely -- our knowledge of it, is messy and fractured. And the further one tries to delve into history, the more fragmentary and conflicting this knowledge tends to become.

The Fall of Gondolin by John HoweThis is self-evident. Oral traditions fail; records are lost, destroyed.

The fractured, incomplete and contradictory nature of Tolkien's legendarium mirrors this -- and this is one of the keys to its deep verisimilitude.

It helps make it more believable, not less.

Just think how many ancient records of the Edain would have been lost in the Akallabeth when Numenor sank beneath the waves. Consider how many more would have been lost in the sack of Ost-in-Edhil by Sauron, in the destruction of Osgiliath during Gondor's terrible kin-strife, and in the decades when Arnor dissolved under the twin influence of internal strife and the assaults of Angmar. More -- much more -- was lost than just the Palantiri, I fancy.

More, elves in the First Age were often poor record keepers:

Menegroth Lee "By the Naugrim the Cirth were taken east over the mountains and passed into the knowledge of many peoples; but they were little used by the Sindar for the keeping of records, until the days of the War, and much that was held in memory perished in the ruins of Doriath." The Silmarillion, Of the Sindar.

And it's not hard to conclude that this is one of the themes of the First Age. Every setback for the Noldor is not simply a blow against their forlorn hopes to overcome Morgoth, it's another diminution of their collective memory -- part of a piecemeal destruction of culture, knowledge and history.

So many elves -- both Sindar and Noldor -- get (to employ the vernacular) toasted in that long, vain war to reclaim the Silmarils from Morgoth. In fact, it's easier to list those who survive than those who perish before the Valar finally show up to haul them out of the fire.

(For the record, of the dominant players in that long, bitter war, my shortlist of survivors amounts to Cirdan, Elrond, Gil-galad, Celeborn and Galadriel -- and the middle two play only a small role in later events, while the latter pair left Beleriand either before, or in the wake of the ruin of Doriath.)

Plus many of the few remaining Exiles who survived the War of Wrath chose to return to Valinor.

The Second Age and Third Age are similarly chaotic -- much is created but even more is destroyed in in conflict, or just lost in the mists of time.

Is it any surprise that our knowledge of Middle-earth is so contradictory and incomplete as a result?

Of course, there are exceptions. One is Pengolodh the Loremaster, who escaped the sack of Gondolin and then compiled the oral traditions, legends and stories that would eventually form the basis of the Quenta Silmarillion. This is the Quenta that later forms the basis of Bilbo's translations of elvish that descend to us via the Red Book of Westmarch.

Pengolodh later survives the destruction of Eregion in the Second Age (lucky guy!) before deciding enough is enough and heading off to Valinor.

Incompleteness generates verisimilitude



But to return to my point: all this messiness is actually really, really cool.

The Bridge of Khazad-dum by John HoweJust think: without this historical haziness there would be no Bombadil debates, no Balrog wing discussions, no asking "just where the hell did Hobbits come from?".

Instead of swapping theories we'd just have bald restatement of whatever Tolkien settled on. And by golly that would be ever-so-dull.

Of course, some of this ambiguity is inadvertent -- the result of Tolkien discarding stories mid-draft for reasons only known to himself.

But read Leaf by Niggle and you begin to understand Tolkien was also aiming for this sort of effect. As he divulges in Letter #154 in The Letters of JRR Tolkien, it is "an elaborate form of the game of inventing a country -- an endless one, because even a committee of experts in different branches could not complete the overall picture."

And I wonder if that is not one of the most astute decisions he ever made as a writer.

So I encourage you to enjoy the journey through Tolkien's world. Because half the wonder of it is that you'll never truly, and definitely, reach the destination.

Demosthenes has been an incredibly nerdy staff member at TheOneRing.net since 2001. The views (and wacky theories) in this article are his own, and do not necessarily represent those of other TORn staff.


Demosthenes
Sr. Staff


Apr 25 2013, 5:39am

Post #2 of 22 (220 views)
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Ugh, can someone redirect this to RR. My bad // [In reply to] Can't Post

nt.

TheOneRing.net Senior Staff
IRC Admin and Hall of Fire moderator


noWizardme
Tol Eressea


Apr 25 2013, 10:46am

Post #3 of 22 (214 views)
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"Like" (if we had a "Like" button, I'd just have pressed it) // [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Disclaimers: The words of noWizardme may stand on their heads! I'm often wrong about things, and its fun to be taught more....

"nowimë I am in the West, and by other names in other lands. Mostly they just say 'Oh no it's him - look busy!' "


Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Apr 25 2013, 11:44am

Post #4 of 22 (226 views)
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"all this messiness is actually really, really cool" [In reply to] Can't Post

Couldn't agree more.



In Reply To
As he divulges in Letter #154 in The Letters of JRR Tolkien, it is "an elaborate form of the game of inventing a country -- an endless one, because even a committee of experts in different branches could not complete the overall picture."



When a game is won, it's over. I want to keep on playing...! Thank you, JRRT. Heart


"I left the night, with its remote and singing stars, and came in, to the glow of the fire, and the chair where he had been sitting, and the unstrung harp." --The Last Enchantment

(This post was edited by Riven Delve on Apr 25 2013, 11:45am)


FantasyFan
Rohan


Apr 25 2013, 12:08pm

Post #5 of 22 (213 views)
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Art imitates Life [In reply to] Can't Post

Yesterday I watched a youtube video called The Umbrella Man that discussed an oddity seen in the JFK assassination films – a man holding an open umbrella on a sunny day very near the point at which the bullets started to fly – that became fuel for conspiracy theorists who postulated many sinister theories: most that it was a signal to the assassin(s), but even that the umbrella was a carefully designed concealed flechette gun. Actually, it was none of those things, but a man making an obscure personal protest against Kennedy’s father using the symbolism of Neville Chamberlain’s umbrella. (Really.)

The gist of the argument in the video came down to an observation that at the macro level, events (especially crucial or memorable events) generally make sense. They have a relatively easy-to-understand flow with recognizable cause and effect, even if it takes some time for it to be understood. However, on the micro level, things are messier. Any one detail, examined under the microscope of one obsessed with understanding it completely, may make no sense. It is part of the chaos of life. The video-maker argued that conspiracy theorists often create elaborate sinister explanations that can’t even begin to approach the bizarre reality of the way human beings sometimes think and act. Life is inherently chaotic, untidy, disordered, with an element of randomness that we probably don’t want to acknowledge (believing that all our actions are well-considered, and ultimately understandable.)

As this relates to Tolkien, his art is imitating life. The overreaching arc of the history of Middle-earth makes a lot of sense. Set up by the original premises underlying the creation of Arda, events happen as time rolls on. Individuals’ choices have understandable consequences (although not always predictable ones), and the legendarium is fascinating in its themes, storytelling and depth. In Tolkien’s conceit, ages pass and much knowledge is lost; in reality, his subcreation evolves over his lifetime of thought and work. The depth that so fascinates us is where we get into trouble trying to analyze and absolutely know every truth. Life is unknowable, at the furthest extent, and that the world created by Tolkien mirrors this truth is only further proof of his genius.


"That is one thing that Men call 'hope.' Amdir we call it, 'looking up.' But there is another which is founded deeper. Estel we call it, that is 'trust.' It is not defeated by the ways of the world, for it does not come from experience, but from our nature and First Being. If we are indeed the Eruhin, the Children of the One, then He will not suffer Himself to be deprived of His own, not by any enemy, not even by ourselves. This is the last foundation of estel, which we keep even when we contemplate the End. Of all His designs the issue must be for His children's joy."
Finrod, Athrabeth Finrod ah Andreth, HoME X Morgoth's Ring



CuriousG
Valinor


Apr 25 2013, 12:57pm

Post #6 of 22 (203 views)
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Very well said [In reply to] Can't Post


Quote
Life is unknowable, at the furthest extent, and that the world created by Tolkien mirrors this truth is only further proof of his genius.

It is unknowable in all its details, and Tolkien created a living world which follows the same pattern.






CuriousG
Valinor


Apr 25 2013, 1:04pm

Post #7 of 22 (210 views)
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Good point about dull debates [In reply to] Can't Post

What if we debated whether Gollum really fell into the fire and destroyed the Ring?

"No!" one theory maintains. "He fell onto a ledge, hit his head, which jarred his hobbit mind to realize his folly, and he threw the Ring in, repenting of his life, then slinking away to live his final days in solitude, too ashamed to face other hobbits."

We could argue back and forth about that, but it would end pretty quickly since we know enough to come to an unambiguous conclusion. It's the ambiguous things that make our "affectionate scrutiny" (as Brethil calls it) so rewarding as we peek under every rock and leaf, looking for answers and more mysteries to solve.


Brethil
Half-elven


Apr 25 2013, 2:31pm

Post #8 of 22 (206 views)
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Nicely said CG - and great post Demosthenes! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
What if we debated whether Gollum really fell into the fire and destroyed the Ring?

"No!" one theory maintains. "He fell onto a ledge, hit his head, which jarred his hobbit mind to realize his folly, and he threw the Ring in, repenting of his life, then slinking away to live his final days in solitude, too ashamed to face other hobbits."

We could argue back and forth about that, but it would end pretty quickly since we know enough to come to an unambiguous conclusion. It's the ambiguous things that make our "affectionate scrutiny" (as Brethil calls it) so rewarding as we peek under every rock and leaf, looking for answers and more mysteries to solve.




The 'affectionate scrutiny' is the best proof of our absorption in to the ME universe. I read many books that satisfy intellectually, that can be read once and set aside and be given quite a nice review; no aspersion against them. But that I am STILL reading these books, after two decades, and in some ways enjoying them more than ever is the proof that the ambiguous reality JRRT created obviously touches more deeply than a casual read. The page-ruffling fact-finding and theorizing is a big part of that.

As you say CG, the joy of peering under the leaves and rocks is endless. I don't think I can foresee a time where that doesn't appeal to me. The mix of history and legend within the mythos is what makes it seem so real, indeed like he was just 'recording' instead of making things up. As a real-world history buff we have plenty of parallels to what Demosthenes describes happening in ME history - like will we ever find the Amber Room? Plenty of real-life things are poorly documented and have mixed stories, confused witnesses, hidden agendas...and somewhere there is the 'real' story. But we might never find it out. If we DID we wouldn't keep looking (the expression 'it's in the last place you look' - DOH! is dumb for a reason.) As RivenDelve says, don't stop the game, I want to keep playing!

There is a real heart to the ME canon and, and that's what keeps it alive. As JRRT said about himself "I am in fact a Hobbit (in all but size)". How can you not love it?

Manwe, when asked a simple "Yes" or "No" question, contemplated, and responded "the middle one."


Maciliel
Tol Eressea


Apr 25 2013, 2:52pm

Post #9 of 22 (186 views)
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i think rather neutral, than good... [In reply to] Can't Post

 
...with unexpected benefits.

a delicious meal leaves us wanting more. another helping (reread), another course (going from lotr to sil), and compelling us to look through the pantry for ingredients and unrefined recipes (home, unpublished material).

but that same ambiguity in an unsatisfying meal (for me, the movie prometheus) does not whet the appetite. it tastes like confusion, sloppiness, produce that has turned, spices that are stale, too many ingredients.

ambiguity exists, and sometimes it's accidental and sometimes purposeful; but it is the skill of the cook that determines if it's scrumptious or not.


cheers --

.


aka. fili orc-enshield
+++++++++++++++++++
the scene, as i understand it, is exceptionally well-written. fili (in sort of a callback to the scene with the eagles), calls out "thorRIIIIIIN!!!" just as he sees the pale orc veer in for the kill. he picks up the severed arm of an orc which is lying on the ground, swings it up in desperation, effectively blocking the pale orc's blow. and thus, forever after, fili is known as "fili orc-enshield."

this earns him deep respect from his hard-to-please uncle. as well as a hug. kili wipes his boots on the pale orc's glory box. -- maciliel


imin
Valinor


Apr 25 2013, 2:59pm

Post #10 of 22 (181 views)
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Completely agree [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't think it's a wacky theory at all. I think it makes a lot of sense and for me is the reason i post and first found these websites on Tolkien and Middle-earth as there were some unanswered questions that i felt i could find out from other people - some were answerable, others were not but have since let to great discussions some which i just read and others i have participated in, all of which has increased my appreciation for Tolkien, his work and Tolkien fans :)

If everything was completely answered then it would feel less real because as everyone has said we can't know everything in life and the more we learn the more we realise just how little we really do know - this is true with Tolkien - the more we delve into little details the more we realise we only have fragments of knowledge or none at all in some cases with just little hints, teasing us!

To me that creates a much more realistic world with greater depth and has kept me coming back since i was 7/8 years old, sometimes discussions leave my head spinning or real life gets in the way but i always return to the books, for me part of that has to lie in the unanswerable questions we are left with.

And Iluvatar spoke to Ulmo, and said: 'Seest thou not how here in this little realm in the Deeps of Time Melkor hath made war upon thy province? He hath bethought him of bitter cold immoderate, and yet hath not destroyed the beauty of thy fountains, nor of my clear pools. Behold the snow, and the cunning work of frost! Melkor hath devised heats and fire without restraint, and hath not dried up thy desire nor utterly quelled the music of the sea. Behold rather the height and glory of the clouds, and the everchanging mists; and listen to the fall of rain upon the Earth! And in these clouds thou art drawn nearer to Manwe, thy friend, whom thou lovest.


Elthir
Gondor

Apr 25 2013, 3:07pm

Post #11 of 22 (192 views)
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purposed inconsistency [In reply to] Can't Post

Nice post and I agree very much about [what I would call] the 'purposed' inconsistency that Tolkien creates. The invented languages are a good model too, as Tolkien knew that if a language was too consistent it might begin to feel invented. Here I would add some inconsistency that was not necessarily on purpose but remains in the author-published texts in any case.


But that said, for myself I draw a line here with respect to inconsistency that in my opinion really isn't. Your example of Galadriel's history is a good one I think. To my mind we do not have a true inconsistency here with respect to the internal world of Middle-earth, and to argue that we do [not that you have argued this], again as I see things anyway, arguably undermines Tolkien's world by creating a measure of inconsistency that was never intended by the Sub-creator, or JRR Tolkien.

In other words, there is no internal history of Galadriel being a leader of the Exiles and having a separate departure from them -- this is rather an unintended external inconsistency, based on readers being privy to an unpublished [and barely legible] draft text from an older Tolkien, with no indication that the author even realized he was being 'inconsistent' here [JRRT had already published that Galadriel was a leader in the Exile and banned specifically for this role].


So this example is very different to my mind, and the legends of the Elder Days will contain other examples.

As I think about the myriad details of Tolkien's legendarium it seems to me that being consistent is a big factor when building a believable sub-created world -- and in my opinion, Tolkien was so successful at being consistent [I note his angst about consistency with already published text as noted by Christopher Tolkien in HME], which is part of the art of subcreation, Middle-earth could not only tolerate inconsistency, but was bettered by it in some measure.

But again, if Middle-earth is the soup it can sustain only so much 'pepper' before the taste becomes too detrimental. And while 'too much' is subjective that is kind of my point: Tolkien is the cook. An example like the two internal histories of the Elessar is purposed 'pepper', but much of the confusion surrounding the history of Galadriel and Celeborn was really never intended as an ingredient.

That is, the history of Galadriel is really more consistent than it now seems after delving into Tolkien's 'private papers', and I think JRRT was no doubt working mainly towards an internally consistent history of Galadriel -- with some pepper for flavor yes.

Mmm, pepper Wink


(This post was edited by Elthir on Apr 25 2013, 3:15pm)


CuriousG
Valinor


Apr 25 2013, 3:30pm

Post #12 of 22 (163 views)
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Great distinction between internal and external inconsistency // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


CuriousG
Valinor


Apr 25 2013, 3:36pm

Post #13 of 22 (160 views)
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What we know and don't know [In reply to] Can't Post


Quote
If everything was completely answered then it would feel less real because as everyone has said we can't know everything in life and the more we learn the more we realise just how little we really do know


Very well said. We know why the Third Reich fell, so there's not much debate about. But no one has a widely satisfying reason why the Roman Empire collapsed, so historians debate it endlessly, even though the Romans were good at documenting their own times and left plenty of records. That sense of not knowing all the answers in Tolkien echoes the real world and lends a comparable sense of reality to Middle-earth.


Maciliel
Tol Eressea


Apr 25 2013, 3:47pm

Post #14 of 22 (150 views)
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brethil gets coolness points for referencing the amber room. // [In reply to] Can't Post

.


aka. fili orc-enshield
+++++++++++++++++++
the scene, as i understand it, is exceptionally well-written. fili (in sort of a callback to the scene with the eagles), calls out "thorRIIIIIIN!!!" just as he sees the pale orc veer in for the kill. he picks up the severed arm of an orc which is lying on the ground, swings it up in desperation, effectively blocking the pale orc's blow. and thus, forever after, fili is known as "fili orc-enshield."

this earns him deep respect from his hard-to-please uncle. as well as a hug. kili wipes his boots on the pale orc's glory box. -- maciliel


Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Apr 25 2013, 5:14pm

Post #15 of 22 (170 views)
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purposed ambiguity [In reply to] Can't Post

Part of the appeal (or do I mean the pepper? Smile) of Tolkien's writing to me is his purposeful ambiguity. I distinguish inconsistency from ambiguity in the cases where Tolkien decides to leave the slate deliberately blank.

For example, I find it utterly charming when I find such tidbits as "Of this Order [the Istari] the number is not known" (Unfinished Tales). And why is it unknown? Because the author chose not to make it up? Certainly not!

No--it is because in this instance, as he so often does, Tolkien portrays himself, in the guise of the narrator, not as the creator of the tales, but rather as the humble storyteller passing on only what he's heard, for whom all the stories of Arda hold as much wide-eyed wonder as they do for us.


"I left the night, with its remote and singing stars, and came in, to the glow of the fire, and the chair where he had been sitting, and the unstrung harp." --The Last Enchantment


Brethil
Half-elven


Apr 25 2013, 5:33pm

Post #16 of 22 (143 views)
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*Thank you Maciliel!* [In reply to] Can't Post

One of those mysteries I hope to see the conclusion of...!

Manwe, when asked a simple "Yes" or "No" question, contemplated, and responded "the middle one."


Brethil
Half-elven


Apr 25 2013, 5:40pm

Post #17 of 22 (155 views)
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The author as the narrator...not the creator [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Part of the appeal (or do I mean the pepper? Smile) of Tolkien's writing to me is his purposeful ambiguity. I distinguish inconsistency from ambiguity in the cases where Tolkien decides to leave the slate deliberately blank.

For example, I find it utterly charming when I find such tidbits as "Of this Order [the Istari] the number is not known" (Unfinished Tales). And why is it unknown? Because the author chose not to make it up? Certainly not!

No--it is because in this instance, as he so often does, Tolkien portrays himself, in the guise of the narrator, not as the creator of the tales, but rather as the humble storyteller passing on only what he's heard, for whom all the stories of Arda hold as much wide-eyed wonder as they do for us.




All true, and that last bit particularly so Riven Delve!
We were earlier discussing in a wonderful thread begun by NoWiz about JRRT's process. It seems to be such an organic mix at times, as things simply appear to the author, springing into life or in a appearing in a dream. And yet it still all works because there is a living world in his head - but some things -as merely the recorder - he rather amusingly never gets the 'full story' of - like the cats of Queen Beruthiel. I find that absolutely charming as well. Like wandering a living garden maze: you never know what you will find around the bend, what is a dead end or what leads to the silvery fountain in the middle.

Manwe, when asked a simple "Yes" or "No" question, contemplated, and responded "the middle one."


Elthir
Gondor

Apr 25 2013, 7:49pm

Post #18 of 22 (145 views)
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Another good distinction... [In reply to] Can't Post

... I agree.

Tolkien 'as translator' lends another dimension to the reality of the subcreated world. Appendix F 'On Translation' is one of my favorites, and the way Tolkien provides the 'real' sources for the Red Book. Ambiguity, to me, can have a slightly different flavor than inconsistency, although we can have ambiguity because of inconsistency of course.

Perhaps one of the lesser known works by JRRT is The Drowning of Anadune, which is a very purposeful variant account of the Drowning of Numenor. This account draws into question whether Tolkien envisioned his world as originally flat or not -- that is, I think many take for granted that it's an internal 'fact' that JRRT's world was only made round at the fall of Numenor -- but when we add DA into the mix, I think it becomes more about perspective and conflicting tales hailing from different sources [DA is a Mannish account].

Tolkien challenges the reader with respect to what is 'really true' about some major issues, including the shape of the world and the rising of the Sun.


squire
Valinor


Apr 25 2013, 8:06pm

Post #19 of 22 (157 views)
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It is fun to read Appendix F with 'Prof. Tolkien, translator' in mind as a fictional character [In reply to] Can't Post

His playacting at such times is delightfully naive: the philologist who gets to dress up and play a philologist on stage, as it were.

But I see Tolkien (the real one) as deeply conflicted about the value of his 'vast game' - as he put it, he had a 'fatal attraction' to that side of fantasy writing (Letter 160), indicating that he suspected it of subverting his efforts to get past the limits of genre literature. At other times he is (quite rightly, I think) proud of his abilities and of the result in LotR, and pleased by his fans' recognition of his efforts in that area.

I don't think he was nearly as pleased with the results in either The Hobbit, or the corpus of The Silmarillion, his lifelong work in progress.



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Footeramas: The 3rd (and NOW the 4th too!) TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion; and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


= Forum has no new posts. Forum needs no new posts.


Ziggy Stardust
Gondor


Apr 26 2013, 1:35am

Post #20 of 22 (110 views)
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Great post [In reply to] Can't Post

That's what I like about Tolkien's world. Everything is not laid out for you. If it was, it would be unbelievable. It would be like being in a video game world, where there is nothing beyond the land that the game takes place. In Middle-Earth, the possibilities are endless. There is so much more. Even the characters that we are presented, we don't know everything about.


Riven Delve
Grey Havens


Apr 26 2013, 12:05pm

Post #21 of 22 (108 views)
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The clinching argument for verisimilitude in Tolkien: the crazy cat lady [In reply to] Can't Post

Every town in our age has one (I've got one in my own family), so why not Osgiliath in the Third Age? Wink Like Tolkien and Queen Beruthiel, we never know the whole story behind our eccentric...

Brethil, this is beautiful:


In Reply To
"Like wandering a living garden maze: you never know what you will find around the bend, what is a dead end or what leads to the silvery fountain in the middle."



My sentiments exactly.


"I left the night, with its remote and singing stars, and came in, to the glow of the fire, and the chair where he had been sitting, and the unstrung harp." --The Last Enchantment


Brethil
Half-elven


Apr 27 2013, 2:43am

Post #22 of 22 (99 views)
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Now THAT is a great line, R-D! [In reply to] Can't Post

"The clinching argument for verisimilitude in Tolkien: the crazy cat lady"

(And thanks for compliment above Heart )





Manwe, when asked a simple "Yes" or "No" question, contemplated, and responded "the middle one."

 
 

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