Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: Off Topic:
It's the Presidents' Day reading thread!
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 19 2013, 2:51pm

Post #1 of 34 (234 views)
Shortcut
It's the Presidents' Day reading thread! Can't Post

For those of y'all outside the US, we used to celebrate Lincoln's birthday on February 12 and Washington's birthday on February 22, but then those days were combined into a general-purpose "Presidents' Day" holiday on the third Monday of the month.

I only learned recently that Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin were born on the same day!

To hark back to an earlier time in history, isn't the discovery of Richard III's bones in Leicester amazing ?!?! For one thing, people still have strong opinions about his character, even after all these years.

This week I read Josephine Tey's classic novel, The Daughter of Time. The novel itself was contemporary when it was written around 1950. Tey's detective, Alan Grant, is laid up in the hospital, and to amuse himself sets about "solving" the murders of the two princes under Richard III. His verdict: Richard was innocent.

Admittedly, it helps to have an interest in Richard and the Wars of the Roses anyway, since Tey pulls no punches in considering all the different players and plots of the time period. But the book is so well-written, very witty, nicely paced, with vivid contemporary characters, that I hope someone with no prior knowledge of the time would enjoy it.

Next up: Elizabeth Peters' The Murders of Richard III, a more straightforward mystery set at a meeting of a group of Richard admirers.

I've already pulled two non-fiction books off my shelves, Allison Weir's The Princes in the Tower (1992) and Paul Murray Kendall's Richard the Third (1955), for the historian's version---an interesting contrast after Tey's take on historical writing in Daughter of Time Cool Weir's book is much less dense and easier to read, while Kendall's is quite scholarly. Weir condemns Richard, Kendall doesn't exactly exonerate him but considers a much wider range of evidence.

What have you been reading?




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 19 2013, 3:03pm

Post #2 of 34 (141 views)
Shortcut
Also, could someone please post this thread next week? [In reply to] Can't Post

I won't be able to post the reading thread next Tuesday and would greatly appreciate someone doing it in my place. Evil




NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Feb 19 2013, 3:25pm

Post #3 of 34 (149 views)
Shortcut
I can post the thread next week [In reply to] Can't Post

I confess to much ignorance over Richard III and all the controversy surrounding how we view his reign. I don't understand, can't we just find out if he was Republican or Democrat, and then won't we know for sure whether he was the embodiment of all evil or the next savior of our species? (And of course, which goes with which simply depends on your own party affiliation). Things are so much simpler in these current times when the media just tells us how to think!

As for my reading -

I finished Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend, by Matthew Dicks. Highly recommended, and yeah, it made me laugh some and cry some, and frankly, sob some. Mrs. Notta has been informed that it is the next book she will be reading. It's a quick read, and highly recommended. The book is told from the point of view of an imaginary friend of a young boy, and there is real life evil afoot, the kind of evil that makes real life parents wake up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat and go check on their kids and give them a little kiss on the forehead. And the imaginary friend wants very much to help out his little boy, and the imaginary friend wants very much to be with the boy to comfort him, and the imaginary friend wants very much to continue to exist. And those things might all be mutually exclusive.

And now for something completely different -

Amazon delivered the next couple of books in Robert Asprin's Phule series, so I've begun Phule's Paradise, wherein Phule and his company have been assigned to protect the galaxy's biggest casino in the galaxy's biggest gambling strip, and oh, probably the galaxy's biggest organized crime mob would probably like to take over the casino. All sorts of hijinks, puns and delightful idiocy is sure to occur.

Notta

Happiness: money matters, but less than we think and not in the way that we think. Family is important and so are friends, while envy is toxic -- and so is excessive thinking. Beaches are optional. Trust is not. Neither is gratitude. - The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner as summarized by Lily Fairbairn. And a bit of the Hobbit reading thrown in never hurts. - NottaSackville


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 19 2013, 4:13pm

Post #4 of 34 (139 views)
Shortcut
Thank you! [In reply to] Can't Post

As a veteran of the reading thread, I'm sure you'll remember all the secret handshakes and such Tongue

LOL and amen to your first paragraph!

I know what you mean about that parental cold sweat. Been there, done that, and am now cold-sweating on behalf of the grandchildren. It sounds as though you really need a fun, frothy read after all that!




NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Feb 19 2013, 4:25pm

Post #5 of 34 (132 views)
Shortcut
Let's see, was it fist bump, thumb wrestle and THEN elbow bash....or... // [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Happiness: money matters, but less than we think and not in the way that we think. Family is important and so are friends, while envy is toxic -- and so is excessive thinking. Beaches are optional. Trust is not. Neither is gratitude. - The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner as summarized by Lily Fairbairn. And a bit of the Hobbit reading thrown in never hurts. - NottaSackville


CuriousG
Valinor


Feb 19 2013, 5:26pm

Post #6 of 34 (141 views)
Shortcut
"breezily confrontational" [In reply to] Can't Post

Read a short story that I don't have with me, and it had a nicely original character description of a hard-charging TV casting agent/produced hiring an assistant that she was intimidating. While playing a power game, the producer was described as: "her tone was breezily confrontational." I'm not used to seeing those two words together and it tickled my sense of humor to imagine someone like that--it wasn't hard.


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 19 2013, 6:54pm

Post #7 of 34 (124 views)
Shortcut
It all has to do with rings.... // [In reply to] Can't Post

 




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 19 2013, 6:55pm

Post #8 of 34 (132 views)
Shortcut
Why yes! [In reply to] Can't Post

I've seen/heard people who were breezily confrontational. What a good choice of words!




arithmancer
Grey Havens

Feb 19 2013, 7:00pm

Post #9 of 34 (131 views)
Shortcut
Richard III [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I confess to much ignorance over Richard III and all the controversy surrounding how we view his reign. I don't understand, can't we just find out if he was Republican or Democrat, and then won't we know for sure whether he was the embodiment of all evil or the next savior of our species? (And of course, which goes with which simply depends on your own party affiliation). Things are so much simpler in these current times when the media just tells us how to think!


Which is (the pro-Richard argument goes) no different from the way it was in those times. The media printed what the Tudors told it to print and that's how everyone thought! Wink

Lily, I read "The Daughter of Time" after reading the Peters mystery, in high school. My knowledge of Richard and his times was then limited to having watched the Olivier movie of Shakespeare's "Richard III" and such random knowledge of the times as a good high school student of history in the US might have happened upon. I found it quite entertaining. But them I do like history generally, I think that would be a prerequisite for enjoying it.

I have since also read "The Sunne In Splendour" by Sharon Kay Penman (after enjoying some of her other historical fiction about Wales). I found it a fascinating (also pro-Richard) read.

But currently I am reading a little kids' story on my Kindle - "The Hobbit". Now that the movie is out of my nearest theaters I am enjoying revisiting the book, which I had not read in years.


NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Feb 19 2013, 7:02pm

Post #10 of 34 (123 views)
Shortcut
Oh right. How silly of me, there is only the One Handshake.... // [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Happiness: money matters, but less than we think and not in the way that we think. Family is important and so are friends, while envy is toxic -- and so is excessive thinking. Beaches are optional. Trust is not. Neither is gratitude. - The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner as summarized by Lily Fairbairn. And a bit of the Hobbit reading thrown in never hurts. - NottaSackville


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 19 2013, 8:27pm

Post #11 of 34 (122 views)
Shortcut
I agree [In reply to] Can't Post

With such a huge "cast of characters", I think Daughter of Time might be a bit much for someone who wasn't already interested in history. However, for those of us who are (I double-majored in history and English in college) it's a delight, not least because of Grant's statements about the foolishness of historians Tongue

Another friend also recommended Sunne in Splendour. Seems as though I once had a copy of that, too, and might still. My bookshelves seem to go as deep as Moria, except with good things instead of evil ones hiding in the depths!

Ah, The Hobbit! A lovely little book....




acheron
Gondor


Feb 20 2013, 4:20am

Post #12 of 34 (137 views)
Shortcut
I heard Henry Tudor wanted to build a car park in Leicester [In reply to] Can't Post

but Richard III told him "Over my dead body!"

I'll be here all week!

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Feb 20 2013, 6:58am

Post #13 of 34 (100 views)
Shortcut
*ba-dum-bum* :D / [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauronís master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Feb 20 2013, 10:41am

Post #14 of 34 (109 views)
Shortcut
Err - this was a reply to "It has to do with rings" // [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Happiness: money matters, but less than we think and not in the way that we think. Family is important and so are friends, while envy is toxic -- and so is excessive thinking. Beaches are optional. Trust is not. Neither is gratitude. - The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner as summarized by Lily Fairbairn. And a bit of the Hobbit reading thrown in never hurts. - NottaSackville


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 2:28pm

Post #15 of 34 (94 views)
Shortcut
But do I have to pay a cover charge? [In reply to] Can't Post

Seriously---well done! Laugh




Nienna
Rohan


Feb 20 2013, 4:57pm

Post #16 of 34 (103 views)
Shortcut
Peaches for Monsieur le Curť (aka, Peaches for Father Francis) [In reply to] Can't Post

Joanne Harrisís third book in the Chocolat series is a delight.

You have to suspend belief a bit (weíre all good at that here!) but otherwise itís a most enjoyable read. Itís about two different cultures and the misunderstandings that often occur. I enjoyed catching up with Vianne and Father Francis again - it's nice to have them working together this time.


Brethil
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 5:11pm

Post #17 of 34 (85 views)
Shortcut
Must revisit Richard soon..Hobbits today though [In reply to] Can't Post

Reading about Hobbits again...haha H. floresiensis style. Dean Falk's Fossil Chronicles, which discuss the huge impacts of both Taung and the Hobbit skulls. Love love that they used the name!!!!

Going to read Alison Weir again next. Hope to see RA in that project about Richard that we posted about in off topic.

...she took the point at once, but she also took the spoons.


Eowyn3
Rivendell

Feb 20 2013, 5:56pm

Post #18 of 34 (81 views)
Shortcut
I love Sharon Kay Penman also. [In reply to] Can't Post

I read "The Sunne in Splendour" and several of her other books; I love historical fiction. Last couple weeks I spent reading " The Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett and enjoyed it very much. I have been going back to reading Tolkien this week. I just replaced my "Silmarillion" with a hardcover edition (easier on my eyes) and I'm re-reading it again for the 5th or 6th time.

" He has just as much reason to go to war as you do. Why can he not fight for those he loves?"


Annael
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 9:53pm

Post #19 of 34 (76 views)
Shortcut
LOL! [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Quote
I confess to much ignorance over Richard III and all the controversy surrounding how we view his reign. I don't understand, can't we just find out if he was Republican or Democrat, and then won't we know for sure whether he was the embodiment of all evil or the next savior of our species? (And of course, which goes with which simply depends on your own party affiliation). Things are so much simpler in these current times when the media just tells us how to think!


I just finished reading a novel by Trollope in which people 150 years ago were convinced of the very same things - if you were a Tory, the Whigs were the embodiment of all evil and would destroy the country if they came into power, and vice versa. Somehow Britain has survived even so.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 9:54pm

Post #20 of 34 (72 views)
Shortcut
I have vague memories... [In reply to] Can't Post

...of the Chocolat movie (like, all that chocolate!) and am wondering how well it reflected the book.




Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 9:57pm

Post #21 of 34 (70 views)
Shortcut
H. floresiensis [In reply to] Can't Post

I, too, am enormously tickled about the word "hobbit" making it into scientific nomenclature. Although I read something about the bones and so forth the other day and the writer never mentioned where the name came from. I suppose it's already just settled into the discussion the way innumerable other names have.




Annael
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 9:59pm

Post #22 of 34 (71 views)
Shortcut
Robert Asprin [In reply to] Can't Post

I haven't read him before, and so many people have mentioned him here that I picked up "Phule's Company." A lot of fun and some great characters that I wish Asprin had spent more time on - the story moves along very quickly and is over with way too soon.

Had to laugh at his view of the future from the 1970s - he postulated that something like today's smartphones would exist in the future, but that one of them would cost the earth so only the extremely wealthy would have them.

The way we imagine our lives is the way we are going to go on living our lives.

- James Hillman, Healing Fiction

* * * * * * * * * *

NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 10:01pm

Post #23 of 34 (82 views)
Shortcut
I enjoy historical fiction to a certain extent [In reply to] Can't Post

That is, when the author is as conscientious a researcher as Penman is! Because a slipshod historical moment can often spoil the story for me. This is where ignorance would be bliss, I'm afraid Unsure

I have to confess The Silmarillion isn't my favorite of our good professor's works, but the discussions here on TORn have led me to a greater appreciation of it.




Otaku-sempai
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 10:05pm

Post #24 of 34 (67 views)
Shortcut
I also recommend Asprin's 'Myth' series [In reply to] Can't Post

Try the adventures of Aahz and Skeeve, a demon (actually a dimensional traveler) and his human apprentice. The books are great fun, especially the early volumes.

'There are older and fouler things than Orcs in the deep places of the world.' - Gandalf the Grey, The Fellowship of the Ring


Lily Fairbairn
Half-elven


Feb 20 2013, 10:05pm

Post #25 of 34 (65 views)
Shortcut
This reminds me... [In reply to] Can't Post

...that someone way back at the dawn of the computing age said that only a very few people would ever have any use for a computer. Remind me not to prognosticate about the future!



First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.