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The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: Off Topic:
How many young people/teenagers on TORN?
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Kimtc
Rohan


Feb 16 2013, 9:52pm

Post #26 of 61 (238 views)
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Tolkien wasn't popular when I was young, either. [In reply to] Can't Post

I came along after the era of "Frodo Lives!" or having Led Zeppelin include references in all their songs. I didn't know anyone who read them, and people who played D&D (the forerunners of gamers) were looked at as odd at best, totally socially dysfunctional at worst. So who was I to go against the grain?

It wasn't until college, when I found myself in a class reading Chaucer in the original Old English (not something I recommend, by the way) that I met people who had read LOTR or TH, and it was through them I began reading in fits and starts (life kept interfering with the unfettered ability to read what I wanted). Only when I was stuck (Stuck? Did I say stuck? I meant happily settled in) at home with babies did I really get to reading them all.

So be glad you got such an early start, and that there is a group online to let you commune properly, instead of running away for fear of not fitting in!


Starling
Half-elven


Feb 16 2013, 10:37pm

Post #27 of 61 (242 views)
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Well, I'm 46 and prone to bouts of *immaturity* [In reply to] Can't Post

so I might be able to squeeze myself into the teenage category. Laugh


Starling
Half-elven


Feb 16 2013, 10:41pm

Post #28 of 61 (234 views)
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I remember that skirt length rule! [In reply to] Can't Post

We had it at our school. I was constantly breaking it. Cool


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Feb 17 2013, 1:16am

Post #29 of 61 (235 views)
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I was 19 the first time I read LotR [In reply to] Can't Post

and about 22 the first time I read The Hobbit. How many of the "people" your age could boast of being a hippie the first time they read Lotr? ;) Of course... we are talking about 1971.

We've had several TORnsibs that joined when they were in their tweens and are still around from time-to-time. Just think... one day YOU can boast of being one of those people!

I'm so happy you found Tolkien. Yours is a GREAT age to get started on these great stories :)

*high five*



Second draft of TH:AUJ Geeky Observation List - updated list coming soon



sample

I'm SO HAPPY these new films take me back to that magical world!!



TIME Google Calendar
TORn's Geeky Observations Lists (updated soon)


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 17 2013, 2:18am

Post #30 of 61 (224 views)
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Cool! [In reply to] Can't Post

The colleges were supposed to be where most of the Tolkien geeks of that age hung out! But if there were any at the small one I attended, they were well off the radar. Unsure

I wonder what it would have been like, had the Internet been available in some form back when Tolkien was writing these...


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"






Kelvarhin
Half-elven


Feb 17 2013, 2:46am

Post #31 of 61 (239 views)
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*tag!* You're IT! [In reply to] Can't Post

Oh yeah, I'm prone to bouts of "immaturity" too Wink

*or maybe I should say, I'm prone to bouts of maturity* BlushLaughAngelic

Bag ENZ Home of the Hobbit *with thanks to cameragod ;D*


One by one they faded, and fell into shadow...

One book to rule them all
One book to find them
One book to bring them all
And in TORn bind them
In the land of TORnadoes...where the brilliant play



Ardamķrė
Valinor


Feb 17 2013, 4:28am

Post #32 of 61 (220 views)
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My oh my!! [In reply to] Can't Post

What exactly does the newspaper say!? I can't even imagine what it would be like to hear you were getting new Tolkien four years after his death Smile

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


Ardamķrė
Valinor


Feb 17 2013, 4:31am

Post #33 of 61 (234 views)
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LOL Curious! [In reply to] Can't Post

Way to make me laugh! Tongue I can totally see it now!

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 17 2013, 6:57am

Post #34 of 61 (204 views)
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<Pins on young-person-Tolkien-fan-badge> [In reply to] Can't Post

Smile Of course you are!

In the end age doesn't matter. My Aunt plays with legos. We spent an entire day building a miniature carnival fun park. I started reading comics at the age a person is apparently supposed to stop doing so. Cool

Žęs ofereode, žisses swa męg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 17 2013, 7:00am

Post #35 of 61 (203 views)
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*High fives back* [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks gramma!

Žęs ofereode, žisses swa męg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 17 2013, 7:03am

Post #36 of 61 (218 views)
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We still have the same skirt and pants rules. [In reply to] Can't Post

No pants for girls, skirts must touch the floor. Not that many people follow those rules, though. Unimpressed

Žęs ofereode, žisses swa męg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 17 2013, 1:34pm

Post #37 of 61 (210 views)
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It's from The National Observer [In reply to] Can't Post

which was a weekly newspaper which my dad subscribed to; it apparently folded the month after this article was printed.

But it's wonderfully written! Entitled "Tolkien and the Heroism of the Small", it begins with that quote about his wanting to make a "body of more or less connected legend", then delves into biographical material, and gushes about Carpenter's "Biography", and mentions "We will finally see [the Silmarillion] this September when the finished manuscript, edited by Tolkien's son Christopher, will appear at last." It also has a large pic of Tolkien in cap and gown.

The paper is yellowed and drying, and I've never copied it into a document. I'm going to do that - I'll post it here later today! Smile


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"






Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Feb 17 2013, 6:31pm

Post #38 of 61 (197 views)
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TORN had a wonderful article [In reply to] Can't Post

after the release of FOTR that talked about heroism in Tolkien's universe, and it ended with the line, "Who are the modern-day ring-bearers?" I'd love to read it again but a search didn't dig it up.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Ardamķrė
Valinor


Feb 17 2013, 7:05pm

Post #39 of 61 (189 views)
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That is fantastic! [In reply to] Can't Post

Thank you so much for sharing! I can't wait to see it once you've scanned it into the computer. I can only imagine what it would have been like to see that in the paper. I might have had palpitations! Laugh

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


Kelly of Water's Edge
Lorien

Feb 17 2013, 9:27pm

Post #40 of 61 (190 views)
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Hi Boromir. [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm in my forties now, but I came to Tolkien as a preteen, reading the books while on summer break. I grew up at a time when the Bakshi animated fantasies had come out, movies like Dragonslayer, Willow and Legend were in theaters, and fantasy was at a high point driven in part by the popularity of the Dungeons and Dragons game.

You're into fantasy at another very lucky time. The popularity of Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and some other franchises means that you probably aren't as alone as you think you are, and if you investigated at school I'd bet you'd find at least a few other fantasy fans. You just might have to look further than your immediate classes.


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 18 2013, 2:25am

Post #41 of 61 (177 views)
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Here it is, in full! [In reply to] Can't Post

This article appeared in a June, 1977 issue of The National Observer, in its "Point of Departure" section. Considering the year, the errors, I think, are forgivable! Smile It is accompanied by a photo of Tolkien in cap and gown, titled "Tolkien at Oxford, 1972: He gave his life to an epic."

Tolkien and the Heroism of the Small

by L. J. Davis

Do not laugh! But once upon a time (my crest has long since fallen) I had a mind to make a body of more or less connected legend ranging from the large and cosmogonic to the level of romantic fairy-story - the larger founded on the lesser in contact with the earth, the lesser drawing splendour from the vast backcloths - which I would dedicate simply: to England; to my country. It should possess the tone and quality that I desired, somewhat cool and clear, to be redolent of our "air"...and, while possessing (if I could achieve it) the fair elusive beauty that some call Celtic (although it is rarely found in genuine ancient Celtic things), it should be "high", purged of the gross, and fit for the more adult mind of a land long steeped in poetry. I would draw some of the great tales in fullness, and leave many only placed in the scheme, and sketched. The cycles should be linked to a majestic whole, and yet leave scope for other minds and hands, wielding paint and music and drama. Absurd.

It is John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, speaking from the pages of Humphrey Carpenter's superb new biography.

The pieces finally fell into place late in 1916 as Tolkien lay at the village of Great Haywood, recovering from the black horror of the Batle of the Somme. "To make a body of...legend", to unite the two ruling passions of his life, the magic of language and the magic of Faery; it would be a feat unprecedented in the modern times. More: to create something amounting to a national myth like the Icelandic Eddas and the Finnish Kalevala he loved so well, a chronicle of great deeds that defined a whole people, where the reader could touch the minds of heroes and thus learn not only who he was, but who he ought to be. Yes, absurd. Impossible and absurd. But Tolkien was young, and he had been to a place that few men, far too few, beheld and lived to speak of afterward, and as soon as he was able, he set to work.

~ ~ ~

It had always been there, of course, in the recesses of his heart. As a child he had loved The Red Fairy Book and the strange, melodious Welsh names on the sides of railway coal cars. As an adolescent he discovered the Eddas and showed that he had the makings of the great philologist he would one day be; he not ony knew Latin, Greek, and German, but Gothic, Anglo-Saxon, and Middle English. And he had begun to make up languages of his own - flowing, intricate vocabularies based first on Spanish, then Gothic, and finally Finnish and Celtic.

This was more than a pedant's hobby, more even than a fondness for the sound of words. It was at one with the poetry he began to write, with the great epic to which he would devote his life - a striving for structure, for meaning, for talismanic strength to endure the terrible odds of this terrible century. It was not enough for Tolkien to invent words and grammar. He was compelled to imagine a whole history to go with them, a culture from which they sprang, a context in which they functioned.

At first he called it The Book of Lost Tales. Later he changed the title to The Silmarillion. It is a chronicle of enormous striving, a great love, and the cosmic war of the elves against Morgoth, evil's greatest servant. It is important to say to those unfamiliar with the Tolkien mythos that his elves are neither cute nor silly; they are man perfected, harmonious, immortal unless killed, their lives their ultimate work of art. Their battles are infused with a heroic coherence utterly alien to Tolkien's experienes at the Somme.

Tolkien worked on The Silmarillion for the rest of his life, creating, polishing, revising, borrowing the forest of Mirkwood from Wiliam Morris and the setting of Middle Earth from the Norse, never quite able to let it go. He was still setting it in order when he died in 1973 at the age of 81. We will finally see it this September when the finished manuscript, edited by Tolkien's son Christopher, will appear at last.

Meanwhile, Tolkien had done something even more peculiar. Telling bedtime stories to his children in the 1930s, he invented hobbits. Hobbits are small, furry, narrow-minded creatures interested primarily in plain food and drink, birthday parties, gifts, and genealogy. For all that, they are a sturdy folk, inhabiting a green and pleasant corner of Middle Earth called The Shire. They are modelled on the British common soldier, and their name derives from Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt. Tolkien wrote about one of them, Bilbo Baggins, who ran out of his front door one day without so much as a pocket handkerchief and followed a wizard named Gandalf and a troop of dwarves; their doings resulted in the finding of a ring that made the wearer invisible, the slaying of a dragon, the recovery of a fortune, and the slightest of brushes against the giant events transpiring in Middle Earth. Almost by accident, the book came to the attention of Stanley Unwin, the publisher. Success was immediate, and Tolkien found himself stuck with the job of composing a sequel.

~ ~ ~

The result, after a decade, was The Lord of the Rings, a huge three-part novel that was hardly what the somewhat bewildered Sir Stanley expected. In it the hobbits find themselves smack in the middle of Tolkien's continuing epic, carrying the Ring of Power to destruction in the Cracks of Doom before Morgoth's lieutenant, Sauron, can seize it and end the world. By inadvertence, Tolkien had tumbled upon one of the most potent elements of myth: that the heroism of the small is a double heroism, because it is the heroism of ourselves.

It is a theme that is at least as old as the Theseus legend, that is absolutely central to the Christian gospels, and that keeps us rooting for certain baseball teams. When Hercules or Sinbad appears, Daddy has arived on the scene: Fixing things and being heroes is their job. By contrast, the 1956 Dodgers actually winning the damn pennant or the hobbits struggling painfully over the ashen plains of the Land of Shadow, on a hopeless quest and scared out of their minds, are powerful figures of empathy. If we ever got stuck with the job of winning a pennant or destroying a demon ring, that's probably the way we'd do it, falling all over ourselves and stepping on our neckties - but doing it, by God, doing it. It is myth made human, and therefore myth made alive.

But did he succeed? Did Tolkien make "a body of...legend"? We still won't know when The Silmarillion apears. We won't even know in our lifetimes; legends don't work like that. Meanwhile, as we await the verdict of the jury, I recommend Humphrey Carpenter's invaluable literary biography. It is not only a splendid supplement to the epic, but it is just about the best book of its kind I have ever read.

[Tolkien. By Humphrey Carpenter. Houghton Mifflin. 287 pages. $10.]


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"






(This post was edited by entmaiden on Feb 18 2013, 2:06pm)


Ardamķrė
Valinor


Feb 18 2013, 3:47am

Post #42 of 61 (152 views)
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Incredible! [In reply to] Can't Post

Thank you so much for typing all that up! It's absolutely incredible. Even just reading it now is exciting. It must have been so tantalizing. I'm so thankful that Christopher did decide to edit it and publish it! Just absolutely wonderful! Heart

There's a sad sort of clanging from the clock in the hall and the bells in the steeple, too.
And up in the nursery an absurd little bird is popping out to say coo-coo (coo-coo, coo-coo).


Laerasėa
Tol Eressea


Feb 18 2013, 4:02am

Post #43 of 61 (163 views)
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I'm 21, but... [In reply to] Can't Post

I was sixteen when I first joined, so does that count? Smile (*counts on fingers* Well, sixteen or seventeen...one of those two!)

I was introduced by my Middle School librarian-- she got me to read this strange copy of TH with Bakshi illustrations on the side, and then she showed me that *gasp* there were-- sequels!! She was a big fan of fantasy, and knew that I always came into the library looking for fantasy books to read, so her recommendations became regular. And, ever since then, I've been addicted. (this was just after the first film came out-- I was in sixth grade)

You're definitely not alone. Smile

‎"When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter's power—upon one plane; and the desire to wield that power in the world
external to our minds awakes."
--J. R. R. Tolkien


Mozart and Chocolate


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 18 2013, 5:32am

Post #44 of 61 (161 views)
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It gave Hope... [In reply to] Can't Post

...when all other hopes had failed. Smile

I don't know why, but instead of keeping the article inside the front cover of my Carpenter biography, it's always been inside my first-edition Sil...oh yes, I made weekly trips to the bookstore, to get one as soon as they appeared!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"






BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 18 2013, 12:38pm

Post #45 of 61 (136 views)
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Hi Kelly [In reply to] Can't Post

I have spoken to several kids outside of my class, but I suppose I haven't looked far enough. I've asked my local comic bookstore owner, and LotR isn't as popular as Warhammer, Star Trek and Star Wars are. But these message boards make up for it.

Smile

Žęs ofereode, žisses swa męg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 18 2013, 12:39pm

Post #46 of 61 (138 views)
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Hehe [In reply to] Can't Post

Book recommendations are always good. Smile

Žęs ofereode, žisses swa męg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


imin
Valinor


Feb 18 2013, 1:10pm

Post #47 of 61 (148 views)
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Not a teen but started reading Tolkien as a child [In reply to] Can't Post

First read the hobbit when i was 7/8 years old. When i was 11 a friend was reading the lord of the rings and said if i thought the hobbit was good, i would love this - weirdly this kind of annoyed me as i thought the hobbit was the best book ever made!

I then read the lord of the rings (and loved it!) Just as i finished there was all the news about the films,etc, so i decided i would try and read it all again before the film (my first time reading it took ages as i got stuck at The Council of Elrond chapter). Read it all again before films release and then went onto the other works, though i got a shock the first time i read The Silmarillion as i was expecting something like LOTR.

As i was 14 at the time of the films release i feel that is a good age for people to naturally read the book for the first time but with the films, it meant it was cool to have read it and pretty much everyone was at that time, discussing the films and the books, though many didnt read all the book as it just wasn't for them - they wanted pages and pages of battle description i guess, lol.

After the three films were released the next big thing came and most people weren't bothered anymore. by that point i was so into Tolkien/Middle-earth that i didn't care.

Also can anyone ever remember taking that middle-earth quiz where at the end of each stage they gave you a code to enter next stage and it was to help bilbo or something? lol. That was some of my first internet searches were about all things Middle-earth!


Frodo_of_the_Wall
The Shire

Feb 19 2013, 11:56am

Post #48 of 61 (131 views)
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Aiya dear nibbling [In reply to] Can't Post

Do I count as a "young person"?? Cool
I wish I'd read Tolkien sooner. Then I'd have read you The Hobbit when you were a baby and you'd have become addicted much sooner.
But on second thoughts....
The obsession might be REALLY scary now. Instead of just mildly scary Tongue


BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 19 2013, 12:32pm

Post #49 of 61 (126 views)
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Ayup. [In reply to] Can't Post

I might have ended up chasing my fellow pre-schoolers because I would have thought they were orcs.

Ag, thank you Auntie. Tongue

Žęs ofereode, žisses swa męg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Feb 19 2013, 6:15pm

Post #50 of 61 (140 views)
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"Nibbling"? [In reply to] Can't Post

I've learned a new word! Laugh

Never fear, let your Geek star always shine brightly, bringing the younger generations into the fold! Smile


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"





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