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Weekly poetry thread: a romantic Grook

Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 14 2013, 5:53pm

Post #1 of 21 (385 views)
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Weekly poetry thread: a romantic Grook Can't Post

This week I'm posting a wry little Grook by Piet Hein. Beneath the snarky surface is a truth: when we really love and trust someone, it's easier to let them go away for a while, because we know they'll be back.

Address to My Beloved

by Piet Hein

Some girls I worship from afar
to passionate excess
But when I meet them face to face
I love them rather less.

Some other girls I love afresh
each time I meet again.
It's not until they're out of sight
that love begins to wane

But you alone, my love, I love
wherever you may be.
So you can stay, or go away
it's all the same to me.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Ciars
Rohan


Feb 14 2013, 7:38pm

Post #2 of 21 (267 views)
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I like that! [In reply to] Can't Post

Very sweet! I like the sentiment behind it, in keeping with the romantic theme as it is Valentine's day, I'm posting a Rabbie Burns poem, even though it can be seen as a bit over the top I've always loved the intensity of the emotions in it maybe as I first heard it as a song rather than as a poem. like the Grook it speaks of the constancy of love,I've always liked the sad almost forlorn tone behind it.

My Luve is like a Red Red Rose

O my Luve's like a red, red rose,
That's newly sprung in June:
O my Luve's like the melodie,
That's sweetly play'd in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonie lass,
So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a' the seas gang dry.

Till a' the seas gang dry , my dear,
And the rocks melt wi' the sun;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
While the sands o' life shall run.

And fare-thee-weel, my only Luve !
And fare-thee-weel, a while!
And I will come again, my Luve,
Tho' 'twere ten thousand mile!


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 14 2013, 7:40pm

Post #3 of 21 (262 views)
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Awww... [In reply to] Can't Post

that makes me a little teary-eyed.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Morthoron
Gondor


Feb 15 2013, 4:45am

Post #4 of 21 (272 views)
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A lyric appropriate for the day: [In reply to] Can't Post

By Simon & Garfunkel:

Kathy's Song

I hear the drizzle of the rain
Like a memory it falls
Soft and warm continuing
Tapping on my roof and walls

And from the shelter of my mind
Through the window of my eyes
I gaze beyond the rainy streets
To England where my heart lies

My mind's distracted and diffused
My thoughts are many miles away
They lie with you when you're asleep
And kiss you when you start your day

And a song I was writing is left undone
I don't know why I spend my time
Writing songs I can't believe
With words that tear and strain to rhyme

And so you see I have come to doubt
All that I once held as true
I stand alone without beliefs
The only truth I know is you

And as I watch the drops of rain
Weave their weary paths and die
I know that I am like the rain
There but for the grace of you go I

Please visit my blog...The Dark Elf File...a slighty skewed journal of music and literary comment, fan-fiction and interminable essays.



Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 15 2013, 6:34pm

Post #5 of 21 (255 views)
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One of my favorite songs. [In reply to] Can't Post

I remember struggling to learn to play the guitar solo for that song. I think with much practice, I was eventually able to do it at half-speed. Definitely never had a knack for guitar.

I've always wondered if the "strain to rhyme" thing was in reference to Sounds of Silence's rhyming "saw" and "more".

Kathy's Song is amazingly beautiful, though.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...

(This post was edited by Kassandros on Feb 15 2013, 6:34pm)


Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 15 2013, 6:40pm

Post #6 of 21 (278 views)
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So these were written in English? [In reply to] Can't Post

I looked up the history of Piet Hein's work and apparently he lived in Denmark and published his Grooks during the occupation by the Nazis, encoding hidden messages in them. As far as I can tell, he wrote them in English, but why would he write English poems in a Danish newspaper? I assume these aren't translations, right?

One thing I like about it is the first line of the last stanza. It's very hard to use "love" in a poem, but he sets up a wonderful sounding "alone my love, I love". None of the words are terribly uncommon in this sort of poetry, but their arrangement here is exquisite. The tripple alliteration and the rhyme of my and I and the way this is grammatically arranged is just beautiful.

Reminds me a bit of the Burns poem that was put in this thread - it covers relatively common subject matter but does so in a very beautiful way. The meter and word use in My Love is Like A Red Red Rose is fantastic.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 15 2013, 9:03pm

Post #7 of 21 (251 views)
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As far as I know. [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't really know much about Piet Hein beyond what I've read in the wikipedia article. We discovered his poems when I was a kid in 1970 and we were on vacation and bought a few books to read in the car. There were five volumes of his verse in the little store in Canada where we were, and we bought them. They tend to stick in one's head, so I've been quoting many of them all the rest of my life.

I really like your analysis of the sound of the words. That's something that draws me to some poems, like the Ogden Nash, in addition to the clever meanings.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



(This post was edited by Aunt Dora Baggins on Feb 15 2013, 9:03pm)


silneldor
Half-elven


Feb 15 2013, 9:33pm

Post #8 of 21 (251 views)
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The Owl and the Pussycat [In reply to] Can't Post

(I chose this one because it reminded me of Wynken, Blynken, and Nod:) :

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat

by Edward Lear

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat:
They took some honey, and plenty of money
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
"O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are,
You are,
You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!"

Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl,
How charmingly sweet you sing!
Oh! let us be married; too long we have tarried,
But what shall we do for a ring?"
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the bong-tree grows;
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood,
With a ring at the end of his nose,
His nose,
His nose,
With a ring at the end of his nose.

"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will."
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon,
The moon,
The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.
and Nod.)

by Edward Lear

';/';/';/';/';/';/';/';/';/';/';/';/';/

I saw these two quotes, feeling they are worthy of pondering, so i will add them too:

Mark Twain
Love seems the swiftest, but it is the slowest of all growths. No man or woman really knows what perfect love is until they have been married a quarter of a century.

Katherine Hepburn
Love has nothing to do with what you are expecting to get, only with what you are expecting to give, which is everything.















Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 15 2013, 9:34pm

Post #9 of 21 (246 views)
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Interesting story. [In reply to] Can't Post

I've seen you quote Hein's poems a couple times and I hadn't actually heard of him before, so I figured you might be something of an expert. But it can be interesting the way we get acquainted with different authors. I actually was raised with Tolkien - my father's favorite author outside of Dickens - and probably naturally pulled away during my teenage years due to naturally trying to distance myself from things my parents' liked. The movies brought me back during my early 20s, though.

Robert Burns was a master of using meter and the sound of words and it really saves this poem, which would be a bit dull otherwise. Also funny that he can be very tender in a poem like this, but also shockingly misogynistic in others. I've come across at least one poem of his that would be hard to tell apart from one of the more vile rap songs. To A Mouse is probably my favorite, though, and very tender and empathetic as well. I do so love the Scots dialect.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 15 2013, 9:37pm

Post #10 of 21 (260 views)
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I love that poem! [In reply to] Can't Post

I grew up with a record (Dorothy Olson singing about Animals and Birds for Children) and she sang a song with those words. I used to sing it to my kids when they were little, some thirty years ago. I can still hear my son's sweet little voice singing "his nose, his nose, his nose." <3

I used to sing Wynken, Blynken and Nod to them too. So I have both of those memorized.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 15 2013, 9:38pm

Post #11 of 21 (248 views)
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My most recent one - Run! [In reply to] Can't Post

I know there's a preference for poetry with regular meter here, but I figure I might as well post my latest.

Run!

Run, Sarah! Run!
Don't listen to your mother or your brother -
You're not going to fall,
Or poke your eye out on a stick.

For it's a beautiful day
Beneath the bright, golden rays of a winter sun,
On a lively, snow-strewn trail that winds
Past tall, bare trees and an icy stream,
And your puffy, pink parka is more than sufficient
Against the hint of a winter chill.

And if you slip or you trip,
If you take a tumble to the ground,
Then the worst that you'll suffer is a bruise,
And that will be a passing pain.

But if you stop,
If you let yourself be held back
And you slowly forget the joy
Of ground underfoot and wind in your hair,
The pain will last far longer.

So run, Sarah! Run!
And keep on running -
For maybe, someday, you'll fly.

( 2013 Cassander)

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 15 2013, 9:43pm

Post #12 of 21 (244 views)
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That first stanza is very giggle-worthy in modern times. [In reply to] Can't Post

I would not be able to read it with a straight face. Laugh

Of course, I grew up with Are You Being Served?, so maybe I'm just hopeless.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 15 2013, 9:47pm

Post #13 of 21 (239 views)
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I love that! [In reply to] Can't Post

It's not a regular meter, but it definitely has rhythm, and all those internal rhymes. I love the energy and light and joy in it, and the hint of pain. Really wonderful.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Starling
Half-elven


Feb 15 2013, 10:36pm

Post #14 of 21 (246 views)
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Interestingly, when I read this to my class of 7 and 8 year olds, [In reply to] Can't Post

it wasn't the words I expected that set them off. Some of them went a bit wild about the 'bong' tree. They shouldn't really know what a bong is, but a lot of them did.

Their favourite part was the runcible spoon. We ended up getting into some great conversations about the potential uses for these.


Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 15 2013, 11:54pm

Post #15 of 21 (250 views)
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Bong-tree made me snicker. [In reply to] Can't Post

But there is no way I could read "What a beautiful Pussy you are" without laughing... twice no less!

I think it's the repetition... just really over the top. Either that or I'm terribly immature. Likely both.

Never heard this poem before, as far as I remember anyway.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Kassandros
Rohan


Feb 16 2013, 12:18am

Post #16 of 21 (238 views)
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Thanks. [In reply to] Can't Post

That's pretty much exactly what I was going for, actually, so I'm glad it came through.

And yeah, I actually take issue with the term "free verse" since it's really just poetry with irregular meter, not poetry without meter. I'm not sure how odd I am for often scanning my free verse, but I definitely pay attention to the rhythm and meter, even if it isn't regular. Especially for the more active passages of the poem, I wanted it to have a younger feel, so I put in a bit of rhyme and assonance and tried to give it a quick moving meter. I actually had another rhyme that I dropped ("For it's a beautiful day for a run / ... winter sun") because the line got a bit too ponderous and I needed to quicken it up. I felt the first line ending with "run" also gave a hint of a rhyme on "sun" which would be better than ending yet another line on the same word. Odd that I never fit "fun" in there, but by the time I get to that idea explicitly, I am in an older, more adult part of the poem and so use "joy" instead.

I did think about using a regular meter for this, but wasn't really happy with anything I tried. Right now, I think the two "pain" lines might be a bit unnecessary, but perhaps I am just second-guessing.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


silneldor
Half-elven


Feb 16 2013, 1:53am

Post #17 of 21 (242 views)
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The straight dope on 'runciosity' [In reply to] Can't Post

You know, i had not a clue what 'runcible' was, so i looked it up and now i am positively nebulous on the subjectTongue. Well anywhoo here is the defining woid on the subject. See what you can make of it.

''Attempts to define the word

Lear does not appear to have had any firm idea of what the word "runcible" means. His whimsical nonsense verse celebrates words primarily for their sound, and a specific definition is not needed to appreciate his work. However, since the 1920s (several decades after Lear's death), modern dictionaries have generally defined a "runcible spoon" as a fork with three broad curved prongs and a sharpened edge, used with pickles or hors d'oeuvres, such as a pickle fork.[6] It is occasionally used as a synonym for "spork". However, this definition is not consistent with Lear's drawing, in which it is a ladle, nor does it account for the other "runcible" objects in Lear's poems.

It is also sometimes used to mean a "grapefruit spoon", a spoon with serrated edges around the bowl, and sometimes to mean a serving-spoon with a slotted bowl.

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable defines a runcible spoon as: "A horn spoon with a bowl at each end, one the size of a table-spoon and the other the size of a tea-spoon. There is a joint midway between the two bowls by which the bowls can be folded over."[7] However, Brewer cites no source for this definition.

The "Notes & Queries" column in The Guardian also raised the question "What is a runcible spoon?" The fanciful answers proposed by readers included that it was a variety of spoon designed by Lear's friend George Runcy[clarification needed] for the use of infants, or that it was a reference to a butler named Robert Runcie[clarification needed] whose job included polishing the silver spoons. The final contribution pointed out that neither of these explained the runcible cat in "The Pobble Who Has No Toes" and simply suggested that "runcible objects (spoons or cats) exist no more than pobbles or feline-hiboutic matrimony".[8]

The Straight Dope, while treating "runcible" as a nonsense word with no particular meaning, claims[9] that an (unspecified) 1920s source connected the word "runcible" etymologically to Roncevaux the connection being that a runcible spoon's cutting edge resembles a sword such as was used in the Battle of Roncevaux Pass. The Straight Dope adds that "modern students of runciosity" link the word in a different way to Roncevaux: The obsolete adjective "rouncival", meaning "gigantic", also derives from Roncevaux, either by way of a certain large variety of pea grown there, or from a once-current find of gigantic fossilized bones in the region.[10]''
















BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 16 2013, 12:03pm

Post #18 of 21 (225 views)
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That's beautiful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I love the simplicity of the poem.

I am going to going into the more melancholic part of romantic poetry. An excerpt from "The Raven":

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
`'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door -
Only this, and nothing more.'

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore -
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore -
Nameless here for evermore.

Sir Christopher Lee's reading of this poem remains the best for me. You can feel the sadness of Lenore's lover.

s ofereode, isses swa mg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


BoromirOfWinterfell
Rohan


Feb 16 2013, 12:06pm

Post #19 of 21 (220 views)
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That brings back childhood memories! [In reply to] Can't Post

My grandmother gave a collection of Edward Lear's poetry to me for my birthday when I was seven or so. This was by far my favourite poem of the lot.

s ofereode, isses swa mg - that has passed, so may this.

"Ten percent of nothin' is ... let me do the math here ... nothin' into nothin' ... carry the nothin' ... " - Jayne from Firefly


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Feb 16 2013, 3:55pm

Post #20 of 21 (225 views)
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Wow, that takes me back! [In reply to] Can't Post

When I was about thirteen, in 1970, I memorized all of The Raven (I can't recite all of it now, but I could do a few verses.) My best friend and I entered a contest at our junior high library. The contest was to act out some literary story, so we did The Raven. We won, because no one else entered :-)

I love Christopher Lee's reading too.

I have to admit I also love the parody The Ravin's of Piute Poet Poe.

Especially these lines:
Ah, distinctly I remember, every ember that December turned from
amber to burnt umber;
I was burning limber lumber in my chamber that December, and it
left an amber ember.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



(This post was edited by Aunt Dora Baggins on Feb 16 2013, 3:56pm)


Starling
Half-elven


Feb 16 2013, 10:45pm

Post #21 of 21 (260 views)
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I love it too, it's a childhood favourite [In reply to] Can't Post

I think it's the first time I started to get an idea of what 'romance' is. My favourite part was the owl looking up at the stars and singing to his love while playing the small guitar; it just made me feel so happy. Evil

 
 

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