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Poetry thread

Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Jan 10 2013, 4:58pm

Post #1 of 16 (170 views)
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Poetry thread Can't Post

Now that I'm back at work after my looong Christmas break, I might have better luck posting the poetry thread, especially since most of my classes don't meet on Thursdays.

This week I've picked another of Piet Hein's "Grooks". This one reminded me a bit of Tolkien's Essay on Fairy Stories, and his remarks on Subcreation.

SIMPLY ASSISTING GOD
by Piet Hein

I am a humble artist
moulding my earthly clod,
adding my labour to nature's,
simply assisting God.

Not that my effort is needed;
yet somehow, I understand,
my maker has willed it that I too should have
unmoulded clay in my hand.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Greenwood Hobbit
Gondor


Jan 10 2013, 11:24pm

Post #2 of 16 (103 views)
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Simple, but effective. [In reply to] Can't Post

Here's a short piece I've always loved, by W. B. Yeats:

Had I the heaven’s embroidered cloths
Enwrought with gold and silver light
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light
I would spread the cloths under your feet.
But I, being poor, have only my dreams.
I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly, because you tread on my dreams.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Jan 10 2013, 11:40pm

Post #3 of 16 (110 views)
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Lovely! It reminds me a bit [In reply to] Can't Post

of the first verse of the folksong "La Llorona". Here's my translation:

If I could ascend to the heavens, Llorona,
I'd bring down the stars to surround you.
The moon I would place at your feet, Llorona,
And with the sun I would crown you.

Woe is me, Llorona, Llorona,
Llorona of heavenly blue.
Although it should cost me my life, Llorona,
I'd never stop loving you.

When I was in college, I wrote a paper on the effect of Arabic love poetry on Spanish, and used this song as an example :-)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Kassandros
Rohan


Jan 11 2013, 2:58pm

Post #4 of 16 (90 views)
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A wonderful rhyme: "clod" and "God" [In reply to] Can't Post

Alas, "understand" and "hand" is kind of a throwaway. With only two rhymes in the poem, I'd have expected a more interested rhyme in the second stanza. Rhyme is hard, though.

And I'll share a poem. Are we allowed to post our own, or just ones written by famous people?

Anyway, due to events in my life recently, I'll share one that's on my mind.


SHE CAME AND WENT
by James Russell Lowell

AS a twig trembles, which a bird
Lights on to sing, then leaves unbent,
So is my memory thrilled and stirred;—
I only know she came and went.

As clasps some lake, by gusts unriven,
The blue dome’s measureless content,
So my soul held that moment’s heaven;—
I only know she came and went.

As, at one bound, our swift spring heaps
The orchards full of bloom and scent,
So clove her May my wintry sleeps;—
I only know she came and went.

An angel stood and met my gaze,
Through the low doorway of my tent;
The tent is struck, the vision stays;—
I only know she came and went.

Oh, when the room grows slowly dim,
And life’s last oil is nearly spent,
One gush of light these eyes will brim,
Only to think she came and went.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Ciars
Rohan


Jan 11 2013, 4:25pm

Post #5 of 16 (101 views)
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A pause... [In reply to] Can't Post

 
I always try to think of this poem when life gets hectic, sometimes it's good to think about the big picture when life gets stressful! It's all too easy to get caught up in today's world with things that really aren't so important.
When I was in school before some "big" exams my teacher at the time took time out from the set poems and spent some time discussing the poem below, a welcome pause from the exam buildup.
W. H. Davies

Leisure

WHAT is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare?—
No time to stand beneath the boughs,
And stare as long as sheep and cows:

No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass:

No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night:

No time to turn at Beauty's glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance:

No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eyes began?

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.


Malveth
Rivendell

Jan 11 2013, 4:45pm

Post #6 of 16 (91 views)
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Another original... [In reply to] Can't Post

I wrote this about 2 weeks ago...


I think that it was fear
That set us both at odds;
I could see for miles, clear,
My sight divining rods;


A moment’s pristine clarity,
Of knowing heart’s desire;
Doubt, the trusted shears,
That clipped the shining wire;

Your laughter broke inside,
Penetrating blood and heart;
A sound I had not heard in years,
It was that that gave me start;

You came and sat and listened,
You stood, you left, did not return;
Hollow words and empty faces,
We remained but did not learn;

Diamond winter heavens
Glitter ice in sugar snow;
Deep heaven is not darker
Than her hair is dark, I know;

And the night is never colder
Than the thought that it is fear,
That makes attraction distance,
When farther should be near.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Jan 11 2013, 5:34pm

Post #7 of 16 (60 views)
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It's a Grook! [In reply to] Can't Post

That's what they're like. I love them myself, but I suppose they're not for everyone.

I love James Russell Lowell too.

Yes, you can post your own if you like.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Kassandros
Rohan


Jan 11 2013, 5:45pm

Post #8 of 16 (54 views)
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A Grook, huh? [In reply to] Can't Post

Hadn't heard of that. Just looked it up.

Rhymes ideally should highlight a contrast or similarity between two words, with sound being important. Here, clod is very lowly. Very earthy. Almost onomotopoetic. So to put that next to God, which is very abstract and heavenly and high, well, that's brilliant. It also implies that God is somehow of the Earth as well - found in the small and dirty things. Short poetry should do a lot with a little. That's effective here. Also, the perfectness of the rhyme makes the comparison more stark. This wouldn't have been nearly as effective with a half rhyme or the like.

Perhaps I'll share one of my own poems next week.

all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us...


Ethel Duath
Valinor


Jan 12 2013, 4:01pm

Post #9 of 16 (38 views)
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Nice stuff here! I especially like [In reply to] Can't Post

Doubt, the trusted shears,
That clipped the shining wire;

and this (especially the last line).

And the night is never colder
Than the thought that it is fear,
That makes attraction distance,
When farther should be near.


This is what I wish I could do, rather than just funny stuff. Evil



Ethel Duath
Valinor


Jan 12 2013, 4:04pm

Post #10 of 16 (38 views)
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Yes, subcreation! [In reply to] Can't Post

I really like this. It's meant to be simple and convey a message with grace and sort of "punch." One I may memorize--might keep me thinking in the right direction when I'm playing or performing. It's easy for musicians to get self-absorbed at times.BlushEvil


Ethel Duath
Valinor


Jan 12 2013, 4:11pm

Post #11 of 16 (48 views)
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Thank you! In some ways, this is what makes us human [In reply to] Can't Post

I think. Not how much we "accomplish" but "who" we are: beings who can see the world as a work of art, and find amazement, inspiration, and a sort of nourishment even in something as simple as that cow pasture, where we're invited to join with the cattle and just "look."


Ethel Duath
Valinor


Jan 12 2013, 4:29pm

Post #12 of 16 (41 views)
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Here are two. The last one kept me riveted. [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm not cat person, altough I do like them. But I love this. Like Ciar's pots, I think it shows us the joy in getting completely caught up in something.

Wordsworth--from "The Kitten and Falling leaves"
See the kitten on the wall, sporting with the leaves that fall, Withered leaves—one—two—and three, from the lofty elder-tree! Through the calm and frosty air, of this morning bright and fair . . . —But the kitten, how she starts; Crouches, stretches, paws, and darts! First at one, and then its fellow, just as light and just as yellow; There are many now—now one—now they stop and there are none; What intenseness of desire, in her upward eye of fire! With a tiger-leap half way, now she meets the coming prey, Lets it go as fast, and then, has it in her power again: Now she works with three or four, like an Indian Conjuror; Quick as he in feats of art, far beyond in joy of heart.

And I was taken by surprise with this beauty (I've never heard of this poet):

http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/20372



Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Jan 12 2013, 4:30pm

Post #13 of 16 (37 views)
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This is in our church hymnal <3 // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Malveth
Rivendell

Jan 13 2013, 4:38pm

Post #14 of 16 (44 views)
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Thanks! [In reply to] Can't Post

That's one that came fast, I wrote it all in one piece in about ten minutes. You can never tell when you'll get one "for free"!


acheron
Gondor


Jan 13 2013, 6:31pm

Post #15 of 16 (57 views)
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Here's some John Dryden (1631-1700) [In reply to] Can't Post

Was once far more well-known though he's fallen out of favor "recently" (that is, the past couple centuries!).

Here's an excerpt from his translation of the Aeneid.

From book VII, Juno speaking and preparing revenge.


Quote
"O hated offspring of my Phrygian foes!
O fates of Troy, which Juno's fates oppose!
Could they not fall unpitied on the plain,
But slain revive, and, taken, scape again?
When execrable Troy in ashes lay,
Thro' fires and swords and seas they forc'd their way.
Then vanquish'd Juno must in vain contend,
Her rage disarm'd, her empire at an end.
Breathless and tir'd, is all my fury spent?
Or does my glutted spleen at length relent?
As if 't were little from their town to chase,
I thro' the seas pursued their exil'd race;
Ingag'd the heav'ns, oppos'd the stormy main;
But billows roar'd, and tempests rag'd in vain.
What have my Scyllas and my Syrtes done,
When these they overpass, and those they shun?
On Tiber's shores they land, secure of fate,
Triumphant o'er the storms and Juno's hate.
Mars could in mutual blood the Centaurs bathe,
And Jove himself gave way to Cynthia's wrath,
Who sent the tusky boar to Calydon;
(What great offense had either people done?)
But I, the consort of the Thunderer,
Have wag'd a long and unsuccessful war,
With various arts and arms in vain have toil'd,
And by a mortal man at length am foil'd.
If native pow'r prevail not, shall I doubt
To seek for needful succor from without?
If Jove and Heav'n my just desires deny,
Hell shall the pow'r of Heav'n and Jove supply.
Grant that the Fates have firm'd, by their decree,
The Trojan race to reign in Italy;
At least I can defer the nuptial day,
And with protracted wars the peace delay:
With blood the dear alliance shall be bought,
And both the people near destruction brought;
So shall the son-in-law and father join,
With ruin, war, and waste of either line.
O fatal maid, thy marriage is endow'd
With Phrygian, Latian, and Rutulian blood!
Bellona leads thee to thy lover's hand;
Another queen brings forth another brand,
To burn with foreign fires another land!
A second Paris, diff'ring but in name,
Shall fire his country with a second flame."


Picking this excerpt for a reason that might be obvious if you know the original Latin text... bit of an inside joke maybe. Dryden's lines "If Jove and Heav'n my just desires deny, / Hell shall the pow'r of Heav'n and Jove supply." come from Virgil's flectere si nequeo superos, acheronta movebo: possibly the most prominent and famous mention of the river Acheron in the classical epics.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


Jan 13 2013, 10:31pm

Post #16 of 16 (40 views)
Shortcut
That second one [In reply to] Can't Post

put me in mind of silneldor, for some reason. Something about the voice.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
 

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