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I meant to use my old nick! What should I do?

Lossefalme
Gondor

Feb 26 2007, 8:06pm

Post #1 of 19 (252 views)
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I meant to use my old nick! What should I do? Can't Post

Blush Sorry. I didn't put the "3" at the end of Lossefalme3 and now I'm just Lossefalme. People know me as Lossefalme3 and that's what I would like to keep. Should I create a whole new me and use up two nicks or should I just leave it alone? Does that even make sense? I'll follow your direction, I just want to know if there is a way I can grab Lossefalme3 back again. Thanks!


Advising Elf
Rohan


Feb 26 2007, 8:48pm

Post #2 of 19 (112 views)
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Lose the 3. It looks better. [In reply to] Can't Post

I always ignored the 3 anyway.

Does the 3 have some significance?

"I haven't any right to criticise books, and I don't do it except when I hate them. I often want to criticise Jane Austen, but her books madden me so that I can't conceal my frenzy from the reader; and therefore I have to stop every time I begin. Everytime I read 'Pride and Prejudice' I want to dig her up and beat her over the skull with her own shin-bone." - Mark Twain


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Feb 26 2007, 9:40pm

Post #3 of 19 (119 views)
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PM Altaira or Inferno. [In reply to] Can't Post

One of them should be able to change it for you.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Lossefalme
Gondor

Feb 26 2007, 11:34pm

Post #4 of 19 (117 views)
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Lose the 3. [In reply to] Can't Post

My nick kept getting eaten periodically, so that's how I wound up with the "3" on the end of my name. I like it without the "3," too, but I'm afraid that people won't know it's me. You don't think that'll be an issue?


Lossefalme
Gondor

Feb 26 2007, 11:35pm

Post #5 of 19 (100 views)
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Muchas Gracias! [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Feb 27 2007, 12:01am

Post #6 of 19 (123 views)
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It probably won't be an issue. [In reply to] Can't Post

Just to be sure, put 'formerly Lossefalme3' in your footer for a bit until people know your (not very much changed) nick and Bob's your uncle.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Alnilam
Rivendell


Feb 27 2007, 2:37am

Post #7 of 19 (85 views)
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Is that a Kiwi expression? [In reply to] Can't Post

"and Bob's your uncle" I mean.

I saw that in "The World's Fastest Indian", but I don't remember seeing it anywhere else.


Alnilam's Realm
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Alcarcalime
Tol Eressea


Feb 27 2007, 3:14am

Post #8 of 19 (77 views)
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I've seen it before... [In reply to] Can't Post

It was on Upstairs, Downstairs, the 70s British Series.


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator

Feb 27 2007, 3:19am

Post #9 of 19 (84 views)
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British English [In reply to] Can't Post

Not just Kiwi :-)




Promises to Keep: a novel set in 19th Century New Zealand.

The Passing of Mistress Rose

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Lossefalme
Gondor

Feb 27 2007, 3:40am

Post #10 of 19 (81 views)
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Excellent idea. [In reply to] Can't Post

Btw, I'm kinda with everyone else with "Bob's your uncle..." What does that mean? The only stupid question is the one you don't ask, right????


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Feb 27 2007, 4:05am

Post #11 of 19 (84 views)
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I suppose it means [In reply to] Can't Post

easily done, something that is achieved without any effort on your part. Also, for variation, Bob's your Auntie.

It's an expression that we inherited from our British ties.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Lossefalme
Gondor

Feb 27 2007, 4:21am

Post #12 of 19 (82 views)
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Ah. Thanks for the insight. [In reply to] Can't Post

 

(Formerly Lossefalme3, just in case you're wondering...)


Lossefalme
Gondor


Feb 27 2007, 5:48am

Post #13 of 19 (67 views)
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What are your pics? [In reply to] Can't Post

All I get is the dreaded red X for all three...

(Formerly Lossefalme3, just in case you're *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Aragorn threw back his cloak. The elven-sheath glittered as he grasped it, and the bright blade of Andúril shone like a sudden flame as he swept it out. 'Elendil!' he cried. 'I am Aragorn son of Arathorn, and am called Elessar, the Elfstone, Dúnadan, the heir of Isildur Elendil's son of Gondor. Here is the Sword that was Broken and is forged again! Will you aid me or thwart me? Choose swiftly!' TTT, Book III, Chapter 2
And Éomer answered: 'Since the day when you rose before me out of the green grass of the downs I have loved you, and that love shall not fail.' RotK, Book VI, Chapter 5


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator

Feb 27 2007, 8:52am

Post #14 of 19 (68 views)
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Are they okay now? [In reply to] Can't Post

The site was down for maintenance, but it's back up now. Thanks for the heads-up.

They're the covers of the three volumes (!) of my historical novel.

For a moment I thought you meant what were my picks for the Oscars. I thought "Hey! I know the answer!" :-)




Promises to Keep: a novel set in 19th Century New Zealand.

The Passing of Mistress Rose

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Aerlinn
Lorien


Feb 27 2007, 2:16pm

Post #15 of 19 (74 views)
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Just because I was curious [In reply to] Can't Post

(small c)

from www.worldwidewords.org/

This is a catchphrase which seemed to arise out of nowhere and yet has had a long period of fashion and is still going strong. It’s known mainly in Britain and Commonwealth countries, and is really a kind of interjection. It’s used to show how simple it is to do something: “You put the plug in here, press that switch, and Bob’s your uncle!”.

The most attractive theory — albeit suspiciously neat — is that it derives from a prolonged act of political nepotism. The Victorian prime minister, Lord Salisbury (family name Robert Cecil) appointed his rather less than popular nephew Arthur Balfour to a succession of posts. The most controversial, in 1887, was chief secretary of Ireland, a post for which Balfour — despite his intellectual gifts — was considered unsuitable. The Dictionary of National Biography says: “The country saw with something like stupefaction the appointment of the young dilettante to what was at the moment perhaps the most important, certainly the most anxious office in the administration”. As the story goes, the consensus among the irreverent in Britain was that to have Bob as your uncle was a guarantee of success, hence the expression. Since the very word nepotism derives from the Italian word for nephew (from the practice of Italian popes giving preferment to nephews, a euphemism for their bastard sons), the association here seems more than apt.

Actually, Balfour did rather well in the job, confounding his critics and earning the bitter nickname Bloody Balfour from the Irish, which must have quietened the accusations of undue favouritism more than a little (he also rose to be Prime Minister from 1902–5). There is another big problem: the phrase isn’t recorded until 1937, in Eric Partridge’s Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English. Mr Partridge suggested it had been in use since the 1890s, but nobody has found an example in print. This is surprising. If public indignation or cynicism against Lord Salisbury’s actions had been great enough to provoke creation of the saying, why didn’t it appear — to take a case — in a satirical magazine of the time such as Punch?

A rather more probable, but less exciting, theory has it that it derives from the slang phrase all is bob, meaning that everything is safe, pleasant or satisfactory. This dates back to the seventeenth century or so (it’s in Captain Francis Grose’s Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue of 1785). There have been several other slang expressions containing bob, some associated with thievery or gambling, and from the eighteenth century on it was also a common generic name for somebody you didn’t know. Any or all of these might have contributed to its genesis.



And here I thought it was simply a Cockney thing.


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Lossefalme
Gondor


Feb 27 2007, 3:23pm

Post #16 of 19 (61 views)
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MUCH better! Cool! [In reply to] Can't Post

 

(Formerly Lossefalme3, just in case you're *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Aragorn threw back his cloak. The elven-sheath glittered as he grasped it, and the bright blade of Andúril shone like a sudden flame as he swept it out. 'Elendil!' he cried. 'I am Aragorn son of Arathorn, and am called Elessar, the Elfstone, Dúnadan, the heir of Isildur Elendil's son of Gondor. Here is the Sword that was Broken and is forged again! Will you aid me or thwart me? Choose swiftly!' TTT, Book III, Chapter 2
And Éomer answered: 'Since the day when you rose before me out of the green grass of the downs I have loved you, and that love shall not fail.' RotK, Book VI, Chapter 5


Alnilam
Rivendell


Feb 28 2007, 3:41am

Post #17 of 19 (47 views)
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Interesting. [In reply to] Can't Post

I taught British English for years and I'd never heard it before. I guess it just didn't make it to the textbooks.

I'll have to start using that, since I'm in a Commonwealth country. Tongue


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Owlyross
Rohan


Feb 28 2007, 1:00pm

Post #18 of 19 (43 views)
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It's particularly popular in and around London [In reply to] Can't Post

The origin is as follows


Quote
P. Brendon, in Eminent Edwardians, 1979, suggests an origin:
"When, in 1887, Balfour was unexpectedly promoted to the vital front
line post of Chief Secretary for Ireland by his uncle Robert, Lord
Salisbury (a stroke of nepotism that inspired the catch-phrase
'Bob's your uncle'), ..."
Or it may have been prompted by the cant phrase "All is bob" =
"all is safe."
(Info from Eric Partridge's Dictionary of Catch Phrases, 2nd
edition, revised by Paul Beale, Routledge, 1985, ISBN
0-415-05916-X.)


"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both."
Benjamin Franklin
The world is a tragedy to those who feel, but a comedy to those who think.
Horace Walpole (1717 - 1797)


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator

Feb 28 2007, 6:46pm

Post #19 of 19 (65 views)
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And of course Eric Partridge [In reply to] Can't Post

(who's one of my literary heroes) was a Kiwi. So Alni was onto something :-)




Promises to Keep: a novel set in 19th Century New Zealand.

The Passing of Mistress Rose

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View

 
 

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