Our Sponsor Sideshow Collectibles Send us News
Lord of the Rings Tolkien
Search Tolkien
Lord of The RingsTheOneRing.net - Forged By And For Fans Of JRR Tolkien
Lord of The Rings Serving Middle-Earth Since The First Age

Lord of the Rings Movie News - J.R.R. Tolkien
Do you enjoy the 100% volunteer, not for profit services of TheOneRing.net?
Consider a donation!

  Main Index   Search Posts   Who's Online   Log in
The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Movie Discussion: The Lord of the Rings:
Which actor best suited his part in the trilogy and why?
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Fionnan2
Rivendell

Jun 30 2007, 10:39pm

Post #1 of 35 (1038 views)
Shortcut
Which actor best suited his part in the trilogy and why? Can't Post

For me personally it is a very tough call between Sean Bean (Boromir) and Ian Mckellen (Gandalf) as being best suited to their respcective parts.Whenever I watch those two acting I beleive I am watching Gandalf and Boromir.I suppose I should give Christopher Lee a mention as well for his very convincing performance as Sauruman.

Fionnan


Alcarcalime
Tol Eressea


Jul 1 2007, 12:38am

Post #2 of 35 (719 views)
Shortcut
My picks: [In reply to] Can't Post

I would say Ian McKellen as Gandalf. For me, he was Gandalf. I lost sight of Sir Ian and only saw Gandalf; and Christopher Lee as Saruman for, I guess, pretty much the same reason. There seemed no discontinuity between the characters I read about in the books and the characters I saw on the screen.


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Jul 1 2007, 3:04am

Post #3 of 35 (692 views)
Shortcut
It's a tough call between Cate and Ian Holm. [In reply to] Can't Post

Both inhabited their parts as easily as breathing. While I think Ian did the best acting work of anyone in the films, the makeup he was given in the covered wagon in ROTK has always distracted me.

But overall, I'd have to say Sir Ian H.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Jul 1 2007, 5:27am

Post #4 of 35 (674 views)
Shortcut
I agree, Ian Holm was fabulous. [In reply to] Can't Post

I was enchanted from the moment he first appeared. He was Bilbo!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Chance Meeting at Rivendell: a Tolkien Fanfic
and some other stuff I wrote...
leleni at hotmail dot com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Tyler
Lorien

Jul 1 2007, 11:10am

Post #5 of 35 (652 views)
Shortcut
This is hard! [In reply to] Can't Post

I can not chose just one i think it is all of them working together that makes the movie work.But if i had to choose just one its gandalf.He's always been my favorite character.From book to movie lan did sutch a great job of bringing gandalf to life.

Never doubt that a small group of peple can change the world indeed,that is the onely thing that ever has......Margaret mead

(This post was edited by Tyler on Jul 1 2007, 11:14am)


JRandomRohirrim
Rohan


Jul 1 2007, 1:49pm

Post #6 of 35 (706 views)
Shortcut
The Casting Is Almost Completely Pitch-Perfect [In reply to] Can't Post

Remember, the cast of ROTK won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble.

The casting is such that even though Viggo is not much like the Aragorn of the books, he STILL works perfectly (and maybe better!).

I didn't like John Noble as Denethor, but I also hated the character in the book, too (so maybe he was "too good").

Boycott New Line!
http://www.boycottnewline.com


Patty
Immortal


Jul 1 2007, 5:41pm

Post #7 of 35 (658 views)
Shortcut
Yes, JRR, I agree. Pitch perfect. [In reply to] Can't Post

Although I am of a different mindset about Viggo--he WAS Aragorn to me, just as I imagine him. I shudder to think of how the too-young Stuart Townsend, fine actor though he may be, would have been so unbelievable here.

For me, I guess it's a 3 way tie between Viggo and the two Sir Ians.

Riding with the Rohirrim!


FarFromHome
Valinor


Jul 1 2007, 5:57pm

Post #8 of 35 (626 views)
Shortcut
I'd pick Ian Holm too [In reply to] Can't Post

Although I think Ian McKellen was perfect as Gandalf, I think it's an easier role to play, and that a number of seasoned Shakespearean actors could pull it off well. I suspect that playing a hobbit is a little harder to get right - finding the right tone between humour and seriousness takes a fair bit of judgement, I think. Ian McKellen actually talks about Ian Holm's performance on the commentary track, talking in particular about the scene where Bilbo welcomes Gandalf to Bag End, and saying how hard it is to find the right tone for that kind of performance.

Of course, he had some experience, as it wasn't the first time that Ian Holm had been a hobbit - he was Frodo in the BBC radio dramatization, another performance I love.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered
and was lost.


Fionnan2
Rivendell

Jul 1 2007, 6:28pm

Post #9 of 35 (731 views)
Shortcut
Viggo Mortesen was unconvincing for me [In reply to] Can't Post

I do not have anything against him personally I just don't think he suited the part of Aragorn I.In my view I would not feel like following Viggo as Aragorn into battle.I believe Aragorn in the book is more realistic as a leader.

Fionnan


priell3
Lorien

Jul 2 2007, 1:51pm

Post #10 of 35 (654 views)
Shortcut
Viggo/Aragorn [In reply to] Can't Post

I thought Viggo played the part of Aragorn very well. That was one thing that struck me when comparing the films to the books.


Darkstone
Immortal


Jul 2 2007, 2:30pm

Post #11 of 35 (719 views)
Shortcut
Very few [In reply to] Can't Post

Less than perfect:

Wood. Too young, not round enough. And his elusive English accent.

McKellen: Too nice, too round, not pointy enough.

Monaghan: Too punkish. Merry is a leader of hobbits, not of brigands.

Boyd: Too moronic. Too Scot. Too old.

Astin: Acts too equal with Frodo. Why is he the fattest? He’s the only one of the hobbits who works for a living. And his “here one moment, gone the next” English accent.

Mortensen: Too young. Voice isn’t strong enough. No kingly presence. Eyes are too predatory.

Bean: Too nice, too light, too Willam Shatner-ish in his big dramatic scenes. A little too much baby fat.

Bloom: Too withdrawn. Elves are not Vulcans! He also needs to talk through his diaphragm. When he talks I want to yell "Breathe, man! Don't forget to breathe!"

Lee: Too crazy looking, too feeble looking.

Weaving: Too Matrix-y. Too much teeth. “He was as noble and fair in face as an elf-lord, as strong as a warrior, as wise as a wizard, as venerable as a king of dwarves, and as kind as summer.” Um, no.

Blanchett: Too zombie-like. Too many wrinkles when she smiles. Nose is a smaller version of McKellen’s.

Csokas: His knuckles are too hairy. Just too human.

Urban: Too dark.

Hill: Too young, too vital, too muscular. Great as The Mushroom, though. Too bad he couldn’t have played the entire movie like that. Would have been a perfect Theoden.

Dourif: Too young. Too sniveling.

Holm: Too crazy looking, too crass acting. He’s supposed to be upper crust gentry, not crumby trailer trash..

Parker: Too soft-looking. And that chin. Nicely insolent, though.


Perfect:

Wenham: Nice and fair and angsty.

Noble: Very King Lear.


Perfecter:

Rhy-Davies: The epitome of Dwarf and Ent. (A Dwent?)

Tyler: The epitome of Elf.


Perfectest:

Miranda Otto: Though many purists felt she wasn't buxom enough, I thought she was The Perfect Shieldmaiden.

Three meals for the Elven-kings high on the sky flet,
Three for the Dwarf-lords meat ripe off the bone
Three for Mortal Men doomed to diet,
Seven for the Halflings of Hobbiton!
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.
Seven meals to rule them all, seven meals to find them,
Seven meals to bring them all and at the Party bind them
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.


(This post was edited by Darkstone on Jul 2 2007, 2:32pm)


Idril Celebrindal
Tol Eressea


Jul 2 2007, 3:03pm

Post #12 of 35 (642 views)
Shortcut
I tend to blame the scriptwriters, not Viggo [In reply to] Can't Post

The LOTR movies blew Aragorn's internal crisis of leadership completely out of proportion, turning him into a reluctant, self-doubting character. Viggo did the best he could given the material he had, but he often just doesn't come across as the more self-assured Aragorn of Tolkien's original conception.

With caffeine, all things are possible.

The pity of Bilbo will screw up the fate of many.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


weaver
Half-elven

Jul 2 2007, 5:30pm

Post #13 of 35 (641 views)
Shortcut
A question or two, if I may... [In reply to] Can't Post

That's quite a list of differences from the books for you -- but I know that you enjoy the LOTR films and that your knowledge of films is pretty diverse and much vaster than mine...

So, you have me curious -- how well does Jackson's casting for LOTR compare with other film/book adaptations, for you? Did they do a better or worse job hitting the mark, in terms of "accuracy?" How important is it that the cast fit the book, in terms of a successful adaptation?

You don't have to answer all those questions exactly, but I would be interested in your musings on this topic...

Thanks, Darkstone!

Weaver



weaver
Half-elven

Jul 2 2007, 6:32pm

Post #14 of 35 (635 views)
Shortcut
the Black Gate speech.. [In reply to] Can't Post

I've come to really like the Movie speech at the Black Gate and how Viggo delivers it...

He starts out by calling all of them brothers -- he's not just Gondor's king here, he's one of them and they are all equal.

Here they are facing certain death in a hopeless and outnumbered situation -- and he tells them that there's something worse than this. That "breaking all bonds of fellowship" -- not Sauron and his armies -- are what will bring the world of men "crashing down". By saying "that is not this day", he helps them feel like them have power in a powerless situation.

It's not your standard military rallying cry -- but then again, Aragorn is a king who can unite Middle Earth, not just a military leader, and he needs to stand for more than victory on the battle field. And so he doesn't bid them to fight or kill -- he bids them to "stand". His speech is not about death, it's not about fighting, it's about standing together for what you hold dear.

For me, in the films, it's this moment where Aragorn is finally "revealed" as the king Middle Earth needs and which we know, from everything before this, he is capable of being. We've seen him measure up privately and in his part of the other battles, and now he shows, pubicly, that he's worthy of that title when the spotlight is squarely on him. It's not book cannon, but it works for me in the films.

Weaver



Darkstone
Immortal


Jul 2 2007, 7:05pm

Post #15 of 35 (637 views)
Shortcut
Movie magic [In reply to] Can't Post

It’s all an illusion created by the film artists. If successful they can trick you into thinking that the casting is perfect. For example, many people believe that Vivian Leigh is the perfect Scarlett O’Hara. But consider the very first line from the novel “Gone With the Wind:”

“Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm”. So actually a charming Agnes Moorehead or Margaret Hamilton would be more true to the book than the all too vivacious Vivian Leigh!

On the other hand look at George Pal’s “Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze” (1975). The actors all look spot on to Doc Savage and his Fabulous Five. But in the movie they’re all just horrible, absolutely awful. The film was one of my biggest disappointments in film adaptations, even moreso since all the cast photos were “perfect”.

If the actors can grab hold and inhabit their role, it really doesn’t matter how visually true they are. (Look at David Bowie as The Elephant Man.) It really depends on the unity of the director’s vision and the talent of the actors. So indeed McKellen is a truly fantastic Gandalf, even though he’s more a big round huggy-huggy Teletubbie than a grumpy pointy violence prone Istari. Which begs the question, would an improbable looking Gandalf who threatened to blow Frodo’s door out the back of Bag End and boil Barliman in butter, or a rather snippy and arrogant Aragorn, or a big fat round middle aged hobbit be acceptable to modern audiences?

In any case, during the movie I’m tricked by Jackson into believing that pointy is round, fat is thin, and that Aragorn is a reluctant king. “Frodo Baggins was not young and skinny, but fans seldom realized it when caught by Elijah Wood’s charm”.


BTW, ...your knowledge of films is pretty diverse and much vaster than mine...

Just cause I'm older.

Three meals for the Elven-kings high on the sky flet,
Three for the Dwarf-lords meat ripe off the bone
Three for Mortal Men doomed to diet,
Seven for the Halflings of Hobbiton!
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.
Seven meals to rule them all, seven meals to find them,
Seven meals to bring them all and at the Party bind them
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.


(This post was edited by Darkstone on Jul 2 2007, 7:07pm)


weaver
Half-elven

Jul 2 2007, 7:28pm

Post #16 of 35 (609 views)
Shortcut
ah, but not by much... [In reply to] Can't Post

You flatter me, but age has nothing to do with my lack of film knowledge -- the list of things I can see without it haunting me the rest of my life is just rather "thin" -- so I see few movies...

I do think these film makers had a sense of what would be embraced by audiences in doing their casting. I think it was wise to give us a bold, confident Aragorn only at the end, given some of the attitudes towards that type of leadership style today, a young Frodo is a lot more sympathetic visually than a mid-life crisis type, etc.

In the case of Aragorn, the only comparisons I can make with Jackson's are based on Bakshi and the voice actor in the Mind's Eye theater version -- of the three, Jackson's Aragorn was the first one to really win me over. The LOTR musical Aragorn comes across as aloof and arrogant, from some of the reviess I've read. (Though going through the Bakshi discussions does make me realize that a less reluctant Aragorn could have worked, if they had given him a better film to be in...and pants...)

Thanks for taking time to reply...I always appreciate the perspective you can offer in terms of how Jackson's film stack up with others...

Weaver



FarFromHome
Valinor


Jul 2 2007, 7:31pm

Post #17 of 35 (632 views)
Shortcut
Now where did those purists... [In reply to] Can't Post

get the idea that Eowyn was buxom?

Very fair was her face, and her long hair was like a river of gold. Slender and tall she was in her white robe girt with silver; but strong she seemed and stern as steel, a daughter of kings. Thus Aragorn for the first time in the full light of day beheld Éowyn, Lady of Rohan, and thought her fair, fair and cold, like a morning of pale spring that is not yet come to womanhood.

"Slender and tall"? "fair and cold"? "not yet come to womanhood"? Doesn't sound very buxom to me! Those couldn't be purists engaging in a little male fantasy could they? ;-)

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered
and was lost.


priell3
Lorien

Jul 3 2007, 7:07pm

Post #18 of 35 (586 views)
Shortcut
A few friendly comments [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

Mortensen: Too young. Voice isn’t strong enough. No kingly presence. Eyes are too predatory. He is a Ranger, his eyes would be predatory always on the watch for Orcs or his next meal. I don't think he was too young. He does have an extended lifespan.

Blanchett: Too zombie-like. Too many wrinkles when she smiles. Nose is a smaller version of McKellen’s. Zombie-like or just wise and calculating and showing some signs of age after 3 Ages of existence?

Rhy-Davies: The epitome of Dwarf and Ent. (A Dwent?)
His role reminded me more of a Klingon than a Dwarf.

Smile



Darkstone
Immortal


Jul 3 2007, 9:15pm

Post #19 of 35 (574 views)
Shortcut
Very John Kennedy-esque [In reply to] Can't Post

In voice and tone and subject.

Three meals for the Elven-kings high on the sky flet,
Three for the Dwarf-lords meat ripe off the bone
Three for Mortal Men doomed to diet,
Seven for the Halflings of Hobbiton!
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.
Seven meals to rule them all, seven meals to find them,
Seven meals to bring them all and at the Party bind them
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.


Emador
Registered User

Jul 4 2007, 2:02am

Post #20 of 35 (596 views)
Shortcut
Stunning!...but... [In reply to] Can't Post

Hmm...that's a tough call. I would have to say John Rhys-Davies, Sean Bean, and David Wenham were the best. Sir Ian was stellar as well. I think the whole cast worked together beautifully.

I think Merry and Pippin were cast perfectly as the characters they were in the movies. They are very different from the books, but they add a great about of lightness to what could have been a very heavy film.

I think the movies were stunning, but there were only 2 people I think they could have cats differently: Elijah Wood and Liv Tyler. They just didn't do it for me. Sometimes Elijah did wonderfully, but at other times, I feel as though he just missed the mark. I think and unknown actor would have been best for this role. Same with Liv Tyler...she seemed too whiny and weak to me. Again, it mght have been better to cast an unknown in her place.

...but that's just me.


weaver
Half-elven

Jul 4 2007, 4:53pm

Post #21 of 35 (580 views)
Shortcut
good comparison... [In reply to] Can't Post

...which I hadn't thought of before. Thanks.

Do you have a particular Kennedy speech you think this compares to? Or just the delivery by Viggo here in general...

The "ask not what your country can do for you" speech is the one that immediately came to mind for me, once you brought up Kennedy...

Weaver



Fionnan2
Rivendell

Jul 4 2007, 10:02pm

Post #22 of 35 (587 views)
Shortcut
Viggo Mortesen [In reply to] Can't Post

Has indeed a weak voice also I would not say that he has predatory eyes he has rather large deep set eyes.Somebody who does have predatory eyes is Sean Bean though.

Fionnan


Elberbeth
Tol Eressea


Jul 4 2007, 10:21pm

Post #23 of 35 (549 views)
Shortcut
*Waits for diedye to weigh in here*// [In reply to] Can't Post

 

"There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark."


Darkstone
Immortal


Jul 5 2007, 5:30pm

Post #24 of 35 (548 views)
Shortcut
Yes. [In reply to] Can't Post

His Inaugural Address

Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty.
This much we pledge—and more.
To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends. United, there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided, there is little we can do—for we dare not meet a powerful challenge at odds and split asunder.

.....

Now the trumpet summons us again—not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are—but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation"—a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself.
Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?
In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger.



Then his Berlin Address, spoken declaring brotherhood with the West Berliners in front of the Berlin Wall seems awful similar to Aragorn declaring brotherhood in front of the Black Gates.

Also his speech accepting the Democratic nomination:

Under any circumstances, however, the victory that we seek in November will not be easy. We all know that in our hearts. We recognize the power of the forces that will be aligned against us.

Of course he was talking about Nixon and the Republicans, not Sauron and Mordor.

In a dark time of history Kennedy, like Aragorn, challenged people to fight and hope.

“I bid you stand, Men of the West!” Seems like something Kennedy could have quite aptly said any time during that part of the Cold War.

Three meals for the Elven-kings high on the sky flet,
Three for the Dwarf-lords meat ripe off the bone
Three for Mortal Men doomed to diet,
Seven for the Halflings of Hobbiton!
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.
Seven meals to rule them all, seven meals to find them,
Seven meals to bring them all and at the Party bind them
In the Land of the Shire where the Taters fry.


Loresilme
Valinor


Jul 5 2007, 6:30pm

Post #25 of 35 (591 views)
Shortcut
Grading the casting choices [In reply to] Can't Post


Elijah/Frodo
Fragile/strong, upper class/still chummy, looks young/acts older, and the perfect earthly/ethereal "Elf-friend" face. Plus I loved the accent. A+ casting choice.

Sean A./Sam
Thick-boned and solid, from diamond in the rough to tower of strength. Sorry for the mixed metaphors. Another A+

Billy, Dom/Pippin, Merry
Hard to separate them, which gives an indication of how good a pair they made. Somehow they reminded me of leprechauns. A

Viggo/Aragorn
A+ for FOTR and TTT. B+ for ROTK which is only a reflection of the filmmakers not having a clear idea or comfort level with the idea of "King". Hard to portray a character clearly when you don't have clear direction. (Note: doesn't exactly fill your new subjects with confidence when your first action after being crowned is to 'sigh'.)

Ian M./Gandalf
So perfect, he probably didn't need the nose. A+

Ian H./Bilbo
Slightly daffy/but shrewd-eyed. A

Sean B/Boromir
The right brawny body type for soldier/warrior, looked natural and comfortable in all that fighting gear, did a lot with a difficult character and some awkward dialogue. Too bad some of his best scenes were cut from the TE. A

Orlando/Legolas
A perfect choice. I do not think it would be possible to find a more graceful and agile actor to portray an Elf. Perfect casting, period. A+

JRD/Gimli, Treebeard
Wonderful physical choice and voice, except I could understand not one word of his dialogue, other than "Yeeeeeess!", which really doesn't count. Therefore, B+

Hugo/Elrond and Cate/Galadriel
Both had the commanding aura, the presence, and the voice, but both were less effective in their facial expressions and appearance. For all the time the filmmakers spent composing glimmery glamour shots of Liv/Arwen, they could have spared five minutes for Cate and Hugo. B+

Speaking of…

Liv/Arwen
An inspired choice. Although did anyone notice, she looked different in every scene? Loved 'the voice' she created for the character. A.

Miranda./Eowyn
Another excellent choice. Perfect representation of a fragile appearance with an inner will of steel flashing through. A+

Christopher Lee
The voice, the presence, the eyes! A

Keith W./Eomer
"The" fiery, passionate man of Rohan. A

David W/Faramir
Captured that faraway look in the eyes of a seer, semi-mystic, needed to alternate it with a bit more toughness at times. B+

Craig P/Haldir
A surprise scene stealer! An arrogant, mysterious, slightly dangerous and yet somewhat pompous character appears for about two minutes of screen time… and yet his death is one of the major tear-jerkers of a 9+ hour trilogy? That is good casting and good acting. A.

And last but not least: David Weatherley as Butterbur!! Was that not perfect casting?! A+++!



First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 

Search for (options) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.3

home | advertising | contact us | back to top | search news | join list | Content Rating

This site is maintained and updated by fans of The Lord of the Rings, and is in no way affiliated with Tolkien Enterprises or the Tolkien Estate. We in no way claim the artwork displayed to be our own. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles, and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their use is allowed under the fair use clause of the Copyright Law. Design and original photography however are copyright © 1999-2012 TheOneRing.net. Binary hosting provided by Nexcess.net

Do not follow this link, or your host will be blocked from this site. This is a spider trap.