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What have you been reading?
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Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Apr 15 2010, 10:08pm

Post #1 of 27 (252 views)
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What have you been reading? Can't Post

Hello all! It's that time of the week in which we gather around the proverbial bonfire to comment what written content has graced our lives this week. Wink

I've been reading, and will finish later today Indiana Jones and the Dinosaur Eggs, as I told you last week, it's one of a series of novels released in 1996 that follow Indiana's Adventures after the Young Indy adventures, but before Raiders and Temple of Doom. (Did you know in Indy universe, Temple of Doom happened before Raiders of the Lost Ark? Naturally not in real chronology, obviously.) Anyway, the premise is good, but it is poorly executed. Dialogue is terrible, and there are random scenes everywhere in the book... it's a pity, since it does have some memorable moments. I tend to judge movie-based books by a simple measure: when you read a character, you can picture and hear the actor and the setting perfectly, as if it were one of the movies. That happened with the Star Wars Thrawn novels. That didn't happen with this one. I have another one at home, by another author... I guess eventually I'll read that one and tell you if it's better.

Here's to Del Toro becoming the Irvin Kershner of Middle Earth!

Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Apr 15 2010, 11:21pm

Post #2 of 27 (169 views)
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Merry and Pippin have fled into Fangorn, [In reply to] Can't Post

missing Eomer teaching good manners to Ugluk with the sharp side of his sword.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Asclepias
Rivendell

Apr 16 2010, 12:14am

Post #3 of 27 (123 views)
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I wish I could stick to just one book! [In reply to] Can't Post

People of the Thunder-historical (or prehistorical) fiction with actual refencesx listed in the back.

Politics and Conservation: The Decline of the Alaska Salmon-a bit dated, but still important information. Just keep in mind the it was written nearly 50 years ago!


SirDennisC
Half-elven


Apr 16 2010, 2:01am

Post #4 of 27 (107 views)
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Just started [In reply to] Can't Post

Beroul's The Romance of Tristan translated into modern prose by Alan S. Fedrick from a c1150 manuscript (supposedly the oldest written version of the tale) that is missing the now familiar beginning and end. The up side of this is the author provides a tight, easily grasped synopsis of the missing parts -- based mainly, it appears, on Vinaver's The Works of Sir Thomas Malory (Oxford) -- rather than trying to fill in in the style of the original scribe/poet.

I find it a bit odd that while Fedrick studied under (and acknowledges) Vinaver, there is no mention of Tolkien (as far as I've read) who, I am sure, both were indebted to. Regardless, it's quite good so far.


Oiotári
Tol Eressea


Apr 16 2010, 2:06am

Post #5 of 27 (409 views)
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Just finished [In reply to] Can't Post

Introduction to the Philosophy of History by Hegel (for class of course)
and laughing at the fact that apparently we are at the end of history Wink

And for my own enjoyment The Cave by José Saramago
started it a while ago, but was distracted by rereading the Silm


Faithless is he who says farewell when the road darkens


Rosie-with-the-ribbons
Forum Admin / Moderator


Apr 16 2010, 11:55am

Post #6 of 27 (162 views)
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Chocolat [In reply to] Can't Post

by Joanne Harris. I have seen the movie a couple of years ago, but I forgot most of it. I loved to read this book, the little bit of magic, the getting together with the people from the village. The way she uses both the story of Vianne Rocher, the leading lady in the book and the priest's, how they both see the world differently and the same. And she has a great way of writing (at least, the translation was really good), so I was totally sucked into the book. I'm now reading The Lollipop Shoes, but that hasn't gotten to me like Chocolat yet (but than I'm only on page 100 from 460).

And The Jane Austen Book Club. Now do I have to confess that I'm not that a fan of Jane Austen. I tried to read Sense & Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice and I can't finish those. I get so agitated with those girls. That might be why I didn't get the clue of the book. I really thought all the stories were a bit strangely put together, not really a connection between the characters and I couldn't see what they had to do with the books of Jane Austen (for I have seen a lot of them in a movie).
But.... it happened that the movie of The Jane Austen Book Club was on TV last week (I didn't know that when I started to read) and I did like the movie. Although I thought the characters didn't fit the characters in the book, they portrait them better and got me a bit better in the story, although still I can't find the Jane Austen in the stories of the characters.

Oh, and a fantastic Dutch book "Komt een vrouw bij de dokter" (roughly, "A woman goes to the doctor" by Kluun). It is kind of autobiographic and it is about his wealthy live with his wife and one daughter. All is going well, until a very severe kind of cancer is diagnosed with his wife. Than how he deals with the whole process and at the end her death. At the beginning you totally hate this guy, for he is acting as if he feels with his wife, is seeing other women besides her, going on holiday etc. But further to the end you really start to feel how hard it is on him (and her) and in the end you really have to have a box of tissues close by. So if there is an English translation of the book, read it!


Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Apr 16 2010, 1:45pm

Post #7 of 27 (92 views)
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That happens! [In reply to] Can't Post

I also tend to juggle books at times.

I bought The People of Silence, but haven't read yet... is there a particular book in the series that you recommend?

Here's to Del Toro becoming the Irvin Kershner of Middle Earth!

Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!


GAndyalf
Valinor

Apr 16 2010, 2:00pm

Post #8 of 27 (95 views)
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A Book of Five Rings... [In reply to] Can't Post

Unlike most this isn't really entertainment (though if one reads it as historical Japan it surely could be) but trying to help me to get a handle on some of the things in my life as it is primarily a philosophy book. It introduces concepts of everything in life in circular patterns i.e. "The lesson of the Beginner and the lesson of the Master are the same." The best part of this book is that while it ostensibly talks in terms of fighting with katana and "companion sword" or the Japanese short sword the lessons are intended even by the author to be applied to any aspect of life. The book has been used by Japanese businessmen for decades as a strategy guide and it's also an excellent introduction to Shinto (the native Japanese religion), Confucianism (the study of the Chinese philosopher Confucius), Taoism, and Buddhism.
Rather like much of Tolkien's writings, the more you read this book the more you'll get out of it as experience adds layers of appreciation for the underlying principles.

"Be good, be careful, have fun, don't get arrested!"
---Marcia Michelle Alexander Hamilton, 7 Nov 1955 - 19 Nov 2009


GAndyalf
Valinor

Apr 16 2010, 2:03pm

Post #9 of 27 (103 views)
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Why would you laugh at such a fact, Oiotari? [In reply to] Can't Post

We ARE at "the end of history", at least until tomorrow arrives and then THAT is the end of history, ad nauseum. Cool

"Be good, be careful, have fun, don't get arrested!"
---Marcia Michelle Alexander Hamilton, 7 Nov 1955 - 19 Nov 2009


Eryn
Bree


Apr 16 2010, 2:06pm

Post #10 of 27 (94 views)
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Try Emma [In reply to] Can't Post

I just can't help an opportunity to plug the recent BBC production of Emma Smile (by Jane Austen that is). It was soooo good, and despite not seeming very Jane Austen-y, did stick to the book quite religiously. If you're not a fan of P&P or S&S, I would be interested to know if you find Emma any better/more interesting/less agitating!! I would actually recommend seeing the TV series first, before reading the book, as I tried it the other way round once, and just found it too slow and too confusing! Watching the film makes it all a lot more understandable.

As for what I am reading: Well, I tend to not read one book at a time Crazy
1) 'Emma' (!!) - I think the best Jane Austen (much more intriguing and original than the much more famous Pride and Prejudice)
2) 'Lance: The Making of the World's Greatest Champion' - have read all Lance Armstrong's autobiographical books, and am now very much enjoying reading about his life from someone else's perspective. Also a fascinating insight into his most recent Tour de France. A great read even if you're not a cycling/TdF fan- one of the most inspiring life stories out there.
3) 'The Unfinished Tales': as part of my quest to read every Tolkien/Middle Earth related book in existence Smile
4) Just started 'Maquis' (by George Millar) - reading it for about the 4th time in as many years. A brilliant, engaging and often frankly brutal account of the French Resistance during WW2.


Oiotári
Tol Eressea


Apr 16 2010, 2:26pm

Post #11 of 27 (103 views)
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because [In reply to] Can't Post

Hegel doesn't think anything else important is going to happen, or could possibly have happened since his time (1770-1831)
I don't know why people keep writing history books. Don't they realize that there's really nothing new to write about? Tongue


Faithless is he who says farewell when the road darkens


GAndyalf
Valinor

Apr 16 2010, 2:43pm

Post #12 of 27 (103 views)
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But... [In reply to] Can't Post

"David Hume, could out-consume Schopenhauer and Hegel!"...Cool

"Be good, be careful, have fun, don't get arrested!"
---Marcia Michelle Alexander Hamilton, 7 Nov 1955 - 19 Nov 2009


Oiotári
Tol Eressea


Apr 16 2010, 3:00pm

Post #13 of 27 (114 views)
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Okay, I had to look that one up [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm actually rather impressed with myself, I actually recognize/have read a fair number of them

"René Descartes...
"I drink therefore, I am" " *snert*

The line about Nietzsche should make sense in a few weeks (that is, if I can ever spell his name)


Faithless is he who says farewell when the road darkens


GAndyalf
Valinor

Apr 16 2010, 3:28pm

Post #14 of 27 (91 views)
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<clinks mugs> [In reply to] Can't Post

The cast members of Monty Python's Flying Circus were all very well-educated men, some having advanced degrees. Glad you enjoyed it as The Philosopher's Song is among my very favourites. The philosophers mentioned are generally considered the titans of Western philosophy. For some similar good songs topical to the 1950s and 60s look up professor Tom Lehrer on YouTube or some similar such. Particularly some of his anti-nuke songs, Lobachevsky (unfairly, as it turns out, making fun of the Russian mathemetician for plagiarism), and others (stuff with the Catholic Church and the teaching of the so-called "New Math").

"Be good, be careful, have fun, don't get arrested!"
---Marcia Michelle Alexander Hamilton, 7 Nov 1955 - 19 Nov 2009


Oiotári
Tol Eressea


Apr 16 2010, 3:46pm

Post #15 of 27 (93 views)
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Here's an amusing video [In reply to] Can't Post

that our prof showed us
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7M-cmNdiFuI
although he said it would be more accurate to say that Hegel, not Nietzsche paid for it
I thought it was pretty amusing, though it would be a lie to say I understood all of it


Faithless is he who says farewell when the road darkens


GAndyalf
Valinor

Apr 16 2010, 3:57pm

Post #16 of 27 (88 views)
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I'll have to trundle off to the library... [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm currently in pirated internet at home so I can't do vids as they knock me offline for bandwidth and the firewall at work doesn't allow it. But I'm overdue to go to the library so this is a good excuse! Cool

"Be good, be careful, have fun, don't get arrested!"
---Marcia Michelle Alexander Hamilton, 7 Nov 1955 - 19 Nov 2009


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Apr 16 2010, 4:04pm

Post #17 of 27 (87 views)
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That's my favorite JA novel // [In reply to] Can't Post

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Apr 16 2010, 4:07pm

Post #18 of 27 (105 views)
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I'm not a huge Austen fan [In reply to] Can't Post

but my daughter is, so I read them for sake. I love the Jane Austen Book Club, mostly because my daughter and I are in a writers' group of 20-years' duration that has a very similar make-up: a mother-daughter pair, one older woman, one man, six people all together. When we saw the movie, my daughter commented, "Oh, my God, it's the Uff Das!" (The name of our group is Uff Da Cum Laude.)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Eowyn of Penns Woods
Valinor


Apr 16 2010, 4:08pm

Post #19 of 27 (89 views)
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"We cannot be held accountable [In reply to] Can't Post

for David."
signed--- The Hume Family, and all of Clan Home
=)

**********************************


Magpie
Immortal


Apr 16 2010, 4:17pm

Post #20 of 27 (87 views)
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and I know what Uff Da means. [In reply to] Can't Post

Anyone who knows how to talk like a Minnesotan knows Uff Da!


LOTR soundtrack website ~ magpie avatar gallery ~ Torn Image Posting Guide



MrCere
Sr. Staff


Apr 16 2010, 5:28pm

Post #21 of 27 (78 views)
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Here is another amusing video [In reply to] Can't Post

All about philosophy, includes your man.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92vV3QGagck

I have no choice but to believe in free will.

The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie

My blog




Mar
Gondor


Apr 16 2010, 5:31pm

Post #22 of 27 (78 views)
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The Help and two by Adyashanti [In reply to] Can't Post

I am really enjoying The Help - Kathryn Stockett - 'bout women overcoming racial discrimination in Mississippi- wonderful strong characters and very well written. The Adyashanti books are supportive of living life with its challenges - knowing/remembering what we really are.

An ill-humored person is a prisoner at the mercy of an enemy from which it is difficult to escape.


SirDennisC
Half-elven


Apr 16 2010, 5:55pm

Post #23 of 27 (92 views)
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Read it a while ago [In reply to] Can't Post

I was surprised by it's unabashed claim to be a manual on how to kill efficiently. The main life strategy I could see in the book was to cultivate extreme confidence, a kind of unshakable belief in the desired outcome of one's endeavours. Some sound advice: to master one art (technique) you must study another as well; reading about technique is inferior to practicing the technique; and a mastered skill flows without being thought about while performing it.

For philosophy of strategy though I still prefer The Art of War. The greatest lesson: In war the only true victory is one where not a single drop of blood is spilled.


GAndyalf
Valinor

Apr 16 2010, 6:09pm

Post #24 of 27 (96 views)
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<smiles> Sun Tzu... [In reply to] Can't Post

Expounds that all battles are fought before either side engages. Very good stuff, but on a strategic level rather than a tactical one.

"Be good, be careful, have fun, don't get arrested!"
---Marcia Michelle Alexander Hamilton, 7 Nov 1955 - 19 Nov 2009


Oiotári
Tol Eressea


Apr 17 2010, 4:18am

Post #25 of 27 (360 views)
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And one more [In reply to] Can't Post

though completely unrelated
after posting that last video I'd been thinking of other amusing videos I'd seen during class
This one's about physics, I don't know, maybe you've seen it before
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j50ZssEojtM
enjoy


Faithless is he who says farewell when the road darkens

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