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LOTR:ROTK bumped from top 10

SirDennisC
Half-elven


Jul 28 2009, 12:00am

Post #1 of 15 (405 views)
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LOTR:ROTK bumped from top 10 Can't Post

"highest grossing films of all time domestically (sic)" by the Transformers Sequel.

Now this is only at the box office and then again is only for the US. And hey, who ever heard of this particular top 10 list anyway?

http://www.superherohype.com/...mersnews.php?id=8567


Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Jul 28 2009, 3:29am

Post #2 of 15 (198 views)
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Well, it's in boxofficemojo... [In reply to] Can't Post

However, Lord of the Rings made the big bucks (or more appropriately Euros, Pesos, NZD, Pounds) what is funnily called "overseas" Tongue, especially in a Kiwi movie based on a British / South African book.

The same happens with Potter films.

Star Wars and super hero movies tend to go the other way around.

Here's to Del Toro becoming the Irvin Kershner of Middle Earth!

Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!


SirDennisC
Half-elven


Jul 28 2009, 3:55am

Post #3 of 15 (179 views)
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Good points and [In reply to] Can't Post

don't forget release dates: In the US, December leading into January is the worst time to try to squeeze money out of the general public (okay consumers) while summer (block buster season) is the easiest.


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Jul 28 2009, 4:44pm

Post #4 of 15 (151 views)
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Awwww... these things make me spasm! [In reply to] Can't Post

I want to see ticket sales, not gross $ sales. The price of tickets has nothing to do with how many viewings have been done. The cost of going to the movies is a LOT more now than it was in 2001-2003, so the $ gross would be higher. Go by the overall viewing head count, not $ spent ;)



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Curious
Half-elven


Jul 28 2009, 6:04pm

Post #5 of 15 (151 views)
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Has there ever been a greater discrepancy between ratings and gross profits [In reply to] Can't Post

than there is for Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen? A composite score of 35 on metacritic.com, 20% (3.9/10) on rottentomatoes.com -- is there a worse reviewed movie in the top ten grossing films? The top 100? Even Michael Bay's own Pearl Harbor, number 96 on that list, got better reviews.


squire
Half-elven


Jul 28 2009, 6:09pm

Post #6 of 15 (146 views)
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Are the gross income numbers adjusted for inflation? [In reply to] Can't Post

When that happens, a whole new list usually appears, headed by Gone With The Wind (1939).



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Idril Celebrindal
Tol Eressea


Jul 28 2009, 6:16pm

Post #7 of 15 (178 views)
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To paraphrase HL Mencken ... [In reply to] Can't Post

Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the movie-going public. *



* i.e., that of 18-34 year men, which the suits have deemed to be the entire movie-going public


With caffeine, all things are possible.

The pity of Bilbo will screw up the fate of many.

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(This post was edited by Idril Celebrindal on Jul 28 2009, 6:24pm)


Idril Celebrindal
Tol Eressea


Jul 28 2009, 6:23pm

Post #8 of 15 (157 views)
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Absolutely... [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks to the magic of teh Google, here's one from Boxofficemojo:

http://www.boxofficemojo.com/alltime/adjusted.htm

Gone With the Wind indeed triumphs over all of its competitors. Star Wars, The Sound of Music, ET the Extraterrestrial, and the Ten Commandments round out the top 5. ROTK clocks in at a respectable 50, TTT at 59 and FOTR at 74. Transformers is at a disturbingly high 84.

ROTK does much better in worldwide grosses: it's 2nd after Titanic. TTT is 8th and FOTR is 15th.

http://www.boxofficemojo.com/alltime/world/


With caffeine, all things are possible.

The pity of Bilbo will screw up the fate of many.

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(This post was edited by Idril Celebrindal on Jul 28 2009, 6:27pm)


Patty
Immortal


Jul 28 2009, 6:30pm

Post #9 of 15 (145 views)
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My problem with the alltime list... [In reply to] Can't Post

is that it doesn't take into account that movies were in the theaters for ages then because there was no such thing as DVD. For a movie to gross over $1 billion now is mindblowing. Even Dark Knight couldn't do it without being re-released into the theaters. I never count domestic boxoffice myself. Movies aren't made just for us in the U.S.

Permanent address: Into the West


Curious
Half-elven


Jul 28 2009, 7:43pm

Post #10 of 15 (146 views)
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Yes, but that's not really fair either. [In reply to] Can't Post

Back in the days before TV, VCRs, and DVDs, movies used to be in the theaters for months and months, and used to come back to the theater again and again. There was no competing forum.

Plus, there's no good way to adjust worldwide figures for inflation. Gone with the Wind, I've been told, has more limited appeal outside the U.S.


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Jul 29 2009, 12:01am

Post #11 of 15 (176 views)
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On the other hand [In reply to] Can't Post

...probably twice as many movies in the 1930s and 1940s got a theatrical release each year as compared to now, so in that sense there was more competition -- and while films often remained in theaters longer then than now, it wasn't the same theater. Almost all movie houses were single screen, and patrons could expect their local theater to change programming at least weekly.

Also, the population of the U.S. is much larger now than it was then, another factor to consider when making comparisons.

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Curious
Half-elven


Jul 29 2009, 12:04am

Post #12 of 15 (151 views)
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Yes, it is difficult to compare eras.// [In reply to] Can't Post

 


Sunflower
Valinor

Jul 29 2009, 10:24pm

Post #13 of 15 (141 views)
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Nevertheless.... [In reply to] Can't Post

This is what the suits in the offices are going to be looking at when they analyze the tracking (forget the opening weekend box office, now they study even the *tracking*! of TH Part 1 in its debut week. These days they analyze a film down to microdollars and say "It made $5 mil less than predicted; therfore it's a failure."

We're now in the process of budgeting TH...or Warner's will be, in weeks. I'm worried that such a micro-prediction for TH may be made, and if it doesn't live up to expectations...I mean, I don't know. What was the tracking figure in the days leading up to FOTR? What was FOTR's opening weekend gross..and was it for a 3-day or 5 day figure, with midnight showings etc? I think it was around $85 mil wasn't it? Which back then was pretty darned good. What was that adjusted for inflation? These days if your opening weekend is less than $100 mil (for an eagerly anticipated blockbuster like TH) it's a failure and the media diassection will be savage.

I don't worry about this too much, since Warner's will be pulling out the marketing stops....but still, let's say another animated film playing over the Dec period opens in 3-D and makes more money than anticipated. I worry, too, that anything less than a repeat of the Cannes Response for FOTR at Cannes 2011 will send jitters up every spine I doubt this will be the case either.

But Del Toro is up against so much...and the competition is just so savage. I really might take PJ's advice and write Warner'sSly. If I were them, the "Eru HImself is watching over this project" aspect might not be enough....if we fans are nervous,imagine them..I wouldn't want to be in their shoes...Sly

(Going OT..sorry)

The other day I was doing some cleaning and went though my DVD collection. I found one of my alltime faves I hadn't watched in a LONG time: The Silence of the Lambs. Now, I hate horror films, in general, but this is in my permanent Top 10. Why? Simply b/c it's a great story that I love to watch again and again, I feel like I'm following a path, on a journey, watching the mystery unfold. Doesn't matter that I can almost recite the film forwards and back.It's no mystery anymore, yet I still love going on the journey, reliving little moments. It's like the appeal of LOTR.
WHERE are films like this now? That are not easily pinned down and marketable--the cinematic hybids, this one being a "horror drama"? No whiz-bang FX, no early attempts at CGI.
I was mystified by it and came to the conclusion that it was simply a great, multilayered, nuanced script and *fantastic acting* that made it timeless. I loved everything about it, and still see new things in it after 15 yrs (like the "full circle of the victim" aesthetic, the fact that the film opens with Crawford displaying the tabloid photos of the mutilated victims on his office wall, betraying a genteel yet unmistakable voyeurism; while at the end of the film, Clarice has the formal family photos of the same girls on her office wall, honoring their humanity..contrasting male vs. female response; or the pointed way Howard Shore injects the hymn "Rock of Ages" into one scene--actually, that's another pleasure of the film for me now; people used to say that TSOTL had no "motofs' or no score; that it was "moody"; but I now see the precursors of Shore's LOTR style and motifs) ; or the fact that Clarice is able to be assertive and the "new woman" with everyone but her own boss, who she acts the passive, demure female with...ducking her head shyly, twisting her earring, etc..or is she using him too? The whole aspect of how they use and manipulate each other, just as each male character attempts to "use" Clarice to his own advantage...even Lecter.)

How, in today's world, would you market TSOTL, esp as an Oscar candidate? How would you get it funded? How would you get the marketing for what is a film driven mostly by conversations and close-ups of characters talking? Today it would be too slow, etc etc. Films like this, or The Shawshank Redemption...or Rain Manor Chariots of Fire...that's what is missing. A Oscar-worthy film, the best, is drama with a bit of spice thrown in. Sometimes a LOT of spice. But they're entertaining too..food for the mind, heart, glands and soul.


(This post was edited by Sunflower on Jul 29 2009, 10:31pm)


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Jul 30 2009, 12:23am

Post #14 of 15 (124 views)
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What are the last words heard in the film? [In reply to] Can't Post

The Silence of the Lambs, that is. (A quiz question in the literature-and-film class I took in college, when the film was just three years old.) And is the film, with "American Girl" and the various appearances by American flags in unusual places, some kind of commentary on the U.S. particularly?

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Sunflower
Valinor

Jul 30 2009, 1:57am

Post #15 of 15 (153 views)
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Do you know... [In reply to] Can't Post

The ending I skipped over on the DVD..)Lecter walking down the street)...I muted...I'll have to check it out. Okay, I admit, I CAN'T quote the whole film then:)

But the Flag...you're right, Mr. Brigand. Funny how it appears in each scene of carnage in the film.
--the enormous flag covering the car in the storage where Raspael's head is found
--twisted into a Viking "blood angel" pose about the body of the officer tied to the cage
--above the body of Bill lying dead after Calrice kills him
--a couple other scenes if I am not mistaken. There might have been one in the girl's bedroom too.

*of course* this is a statement about violence in the US, and Lecter's creative useage of the Flag is his own ironic take on the matter. A twisted character making a twisted statement. "Only this country could breed creatures like us" maybe?


(This post was edited by Sunflower on Jul 30 2009, 1:58am)

 
 

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