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The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Reading Room:
Tolkien Illustrated: Ted Nasmith #6 – The Fellowship of the Ring III
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Altaira
Superuser / Moderator


Apr 4 2007, 3:56am

Post #1 of 37 (1003 views)
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Tolkien Illustrated: Ted Nasmith #6 – The Fellowship of the Ring III Can't Post

Following are the last pieces I selected of Ted’s illustrations of The Fellowship of the Ring, again, arranged chronologically through the book. So far, we’ve discussed Ted’s style of luminism and realism, and his efforts to hone his talent for picking up details from Tolkien’s text (often by interpreting the same character or scene more than once).

So, please comment on the following pictures with your impressions and thoughts about…

a) The treatment of light and/or shadow
b) Aspects of realism vs. fantasy
c) Literal (or metaphorical Wink) depiction of the text, including details

*******************
From the 2002 Tolkien/Fellowship of the Ring Calendar:

“Such light and flame cannot have been seen on Weathertop since the war-beacons of old”



Fire on Weathertop; tednasmith.com



*******************
From the 1990 Tolkien Calendar:

“With his last failing senses Frodo heard cries, and it seemed to him that he saw, beyond the Riders that hesitated on the shore, a shining figure of white light.”



Riders at the Ford; tednasmith.com



*******************
Also from the 1990 Tolkien Calendar:

“Painted over many months (off and on), this painting was deliberately envisioned as a more realistic treatment of Tolkien’s own watercolour from The Hobbit, somewhat in the tradition of the Hudson River school of landscape painting, but incorporating an ambitious amount of detail like the magic-realism artists of the ’60s and ’70s.”
- Ted Nasmith; tednasmith.com


Rivendell; tednasmith.com


And, for comparison purposes…



Rivendell; J.R.R. Tolkien (google)




*******************
From the 2002 Tolkien/Fellowship of the Ring Calendar

“So it was that when summer waned, there came a night of moon, and Gwaihir the Windlord, swiftest of the Great Eagles, came unlooked-for to Orthanc.”



Gandalf Escapes Upon Gwaihir; tednasmith.com




*******************
From the 1992 Tolkien Calendar:

They turned a sharp bend in the river, and there, sailing proudly down the stream toward them, they saw a swan of great size.”



Farewell to Lorien; tednasmith.com




*******************
Also for the 2002 Tolkien/Fellowship of the Ring Calendar:

“Upon great pedestals founded in the deep waters stood two great kings of stone: still with blurred eyes and crannied brows they frowned upon the North. The left hand of each was raised palm outwards in gesture of warning; in each right hand there was an axe; upon each head there was a crumbling helm and crown.”



The Pillars of the Kings; tednasmith.com




*******************
For the 2002 Tolkien/Fellowship of the Ring Calendar:

“Boromir stood silent. Rauros roared endlessly on. The wind murmured in the branches of the trees. Frodo shivered.”



Boromir; tednasmith.com


Koru: Maori symbol representing a fern frond as it opens. The koru reaches towards the light, striving for perfection, encouraging new, positive beginnings.



"All we have to decide is what to do with the boards that are given to us"



"I take a moment to fervently hope that the camaradarie and just plain old fun I found at TORn will never end" -- LOTR_nutcase

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Beren IV
Gondor


Apr 4 2007, 4:32am

Post #2 of 37 (787 views)
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More magical battles [In reply to] Can't Post

Battles between Gandalf and other highly magical opponents are perhaps my favorite of Tolkien artwork, because it is really only here that the artists let their imaginations go with what magic exists in Tolkien. Most of the rest of the time, artists are either anti-magic "purists" or they are D&D-inspired "blasters". It is only when Gandalf is fighting Nazgul and the like that artists approach the fantastical side of things.

So, individual pictures:

Battle at Weathertop - one of my favorite pieces of Tolkien artwork, this has been for a long time how I envisioned that, although I would call this one of the less flashy moments. Still, I like this, and the clouds in the background make for nice atmospheric effect. The flames need to be brighter though, for the company to see them three nights (=100 km!) away.

The Flooding of the Greaflood - Not enough detail in the background, and Glorfindel looks too white, if you will, and not radiant enough if he does look like that. Whose prospective are we seeing this from? And the water is too blue. Not one of my favorite of Nasmith's paintings, despite its subject.

Rivendell - well-composed, but too much farmland. The mountains are also too far in the distance - this looks like there is a plain on top of those cliffs, and there should not be. Rivendell would be too hard to hide if they were plains. There should be hills. This isn't the Grand Canyon.

Orthanc - again, nice compositionally, although Mathedras in the background is a little too steep. Also, what is that pinnacle beneath Mathedras? It is a nice touch - pinnacles are fun in high-fantasy, although I don't know if it is composed right. The background behind Gwiahir looks perhaps a little too light, becuase there is no visible light source it almost looks like a stormy day rather than a gloomy night. The clouds are good, though.

The farewell - Generally looks good. Does not grab me as much as some of the others, characters are too small. Mallorns too uniform (it's hard to paint fictional trees realistically).

The Argonath - Lighting is done real well, as is atmospheric effect. However, Nasmith puts wisps of cloud in-between the pillars, which makes them appear much larger than I think they are. I don't see the pillars as being a kilometer or more in height, and if they are that tall, than Amon Lhaw could be Himalayan in size. I think that Nasmith overdoes it here, in terms of believability of the setting, no matter how good or effective he is compositionally.

Once a paleontologist, now a botanist, will be a paleobotanist


Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Apr 4 2007, 9:23am

Post #3 of 37 (799 views)
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made my heart soar! [In reply to] Can't Post

 
Fire on Weathertop:

First I'd like to say I love that this scene is even depicted…and it is wonderful!
a) The treatment of light and/or shadow
the contrast in the twilight sky with the black cloud seems to reflect the scene of firey turmoil between the good & evil forces of Gandalf & Nazgûl. I love how the light on Gandalf emphasizes how powerful his is, every his beard and cloak reflect the energetic shapes of the flames (just a tad to mosses-like)

b) Aspects of realism vs. fantasy
even the horses look monstrous & evil.

- one minor nit-pick: Gandalf's horse has horns like a unicorn with 2 horns

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Riders at the Ford:

a) The treatment of light and/or shadow
this is what makes Glorfindel work.

b) Aspects of realism vs. fantasy
I think this is very well done, I like Howe's better tough.

c) Literal (or metaphorical ) depiction of the text, including details
The literal interpretation is exactly right.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Rivendell
I never know that this image by Ted was intended as a "deliberately envisioned as a more realistic treatment of Tolkien’s own watercolour from The Hobbit". I totally see it.

a) The treatment of light and/or shadow
note: that Thomas Cole painting shown in the Wikipedia link really reminds me of Nazmith's stile, even more than the many others I have looked at I the last 24 hours.

b) Aspects of realism vs. fantasy
Realism is what works for me with ME settings.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Gandalf Escapes Upon Gwaihir

a) The treatment of light and/or shadow
b) Aspects of realism vs. fantasy
c) Literal (or metaphorical ) depiction of the text, including details

The Luminism is perfectly executed and it really shows it influence in this piece.
The light from the moon lights up the clouds and the rocks and reflects off the Mountains all so brilliantly, but yet retains its realism. And at the same time is quite fantastical. It is just awesome.

This image made my heart soar!!!!! It will undoubtedly become my favorite Nazmith. It is such a dynamic image, tit is beautiful and breathtaking.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

a) The treatment of light and/or shadow
there is something quite similar between these two images

http://tolkiengateway.net/...rewell_to_Lórien.jpg



Thomas Cole painting shown on the Altaira's Wikipedia link


This is about as much as I have time for…
Pillars of the Kings is another fine Luminism example.


..

Alan Lee Discussion week: starts March 25th in the Reading Room
Discussion Ideas, Alan Lee–Introduction, Scanned images for Alan Lee Discussion.

Art Gallery Revised, ORC pic of Hawaii friends, my drawings,
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Nienna: “ those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta

(This post was edited by Daughter of Nienna on Apr 4 2007, 9:27am)


Owlyross
Rohan


Apr 4 2007, 1:33pm

Post #4 of 37 (783 views)
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Firstly, I love all of these! [In reply to] Can't Post

Weathertop looks like a classical painting, it's the sort of thing you can imagine just before the light show that Aragorn and the Hobbits see. I guess I saw more than just the very foundations of the tower, but I think it is what Tolkien wrote.

Riders at the Ford, no complaints whatsoever, although the Black Riders are rather 'lightly' attired...

I adore that Rivendell painting, it's the desktop on my work computer.

I love Gandalf escaping on Gwaihir, the mountains, the light of the moon. Orthanc is possibly a little spacerocket-like, but I love the moodyness of the piece.

Interesting that on the Argonath he doesn't go for the arms outstretched, but rather for an upraised palm like old medieval religious drawings.

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both."
Benjamin Franklin
The world is a tragedy to those who feel, but a comedy to those who think.
Horace Walpole (1717 - 1797)


Curious
Half-elven

Apr 4 2007, 10:27pm

Post #5 of 37 (774 views)
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That's not much light and flame. Gandalf looks like he's carrying a torch. [In reply to] Can't Post

I would think Nasmith would revel in the chance to show some real fireworks here, or lighting, but he chooses something more realistic. I wish he had been more daring, even though I quite like Gandalf's flying beard and robes and all the horses in action and black robes flying about. I suppose one problem with more light would have been keeping the Nazgul in shadow, when they are most menacing. I'll just think of this as a pause between the real action -- although I wish I could see the real action.

I'll have to get back to these pictures later, although I will say that overall I like them quite a bit.


Morwen
Rohan


Apr 5 2007, 12:07am

Post #6 of 37 (752 views)
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Lighting [In reply to] Can't Post

I especially like the light in Gandalf Escapes and in the Argonath picture. The eagle backlit by the cloud covered moon gives a very dramatic feeling to the picture. That and the eerie light shining from the tower gives the painting a supernatural feeling without appearing unrealistic.

The dark choppy waters and the mist surrounding the statues of the old kings give that painting a dark, spooky feeling, reflecting Sam and Frodo's apprehension at their first sight of the Argonath. The mist from the river makes it hard to tell if the the imposing figures are real or visionary, which would have served as an ominous warning for anyone who came upon them unexpectedly. This suits the way I imagine the scene very well.

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When she opened up the door
And looked me in the face
Like she never did before
I felt about as welcome
As a Wal-Mart Superstore--John Prine


Curious
Half-elven

Apr 5 2007, 2:09pm

Post #7 of 37 (762 views)
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The Ford and Rivendell. [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm guessing this is the vision of the Ford through Frodo's eyes, for the Black Riders seem to be fully visible, including hands and faces. Since that is the case, I think Glorfindel should be a more blinding white, like the vision of an angel, with an aura of light around him. Instead Glorfindel simply looks like a man dressed in white, and as such his pose looks a little silly. I love the horses in the waves, though. Some might consider this too obvious and overblown, or too whimsical and unrealistic, but I think it works, and is faithful to Tolkien's own description.

I love Nasmith's painting of Rivendell. Despite the homage to Tolkien, there are many differences between the two illustrations. Nasmith's valley is much larger than Tolkien's, and Elrond's home manages to look both larger, i.e. a larger building, and smaller, i.e. smaller in relation to the valley and mountains. Where Tolkien shows one waterfall, Nasmith shows a series of waterfalls.

Nasmith's painting is of course more realistic, but it also shows better technique. Tolkien had some trouble with perspective and lines. Some of Tolkien's best designs are the covers in which he provided the idea but a professional finished the job. Also, in his picture Tolkien was trying to be realistic, which is not his strong suit. Just look at Nasmith's rocks vs. Tolkien's, for example. Tolkien's stratification may be a nice design, but bears no resemblance to nature. The same is true of his too-steep mountains.

Nasmith darkens the trees, creating a nice contrast between mountain conifers and meadows. Nasmith lifts the perspective far into the air to show the whole range of mountains in the distance, and since he is much better at drawing mountains than Tolkien, it is a truly spectacular background. Nasmith's steps and path are perfectly executed, as opposed to Tolkien's, which seems to be added at the last moment.

Let's give Tolkien full credit for the idea behind the picture. If only Tolkien could have worked as closely with Nasmith, Lee, and Howe as he did with Baynes or the people who executed his cover designs, what a wonderful collection of illustrations we would have! I'll give Nasmith credit, though, for taking Tolkien's ball and running with it. I wonder how the movies would have changed if Nasmith had been able to participate. Perhaps I would have been more pleased with Rivendell and Lothlorien. Perhaps they would have been full of light and color and closer to Tolkien's vision.


FarFromHome
Valinor


Apr 5 2007, 3:42pm

Post #8 of 37 (760 views)
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Most of these remind me of movie shots [In reply to] Can't Post

Although the details may be different (Frodo instead of Arwen on Asfaloth, and so on), many of these pictures seem very similar to the movie treatments in terms of colour, composition and perspective. Gandalf escaping from Orthanc on Gwaihir, the Farewell to Lorien, and even the general layout of the Rivendell valley seem very similar (although Nasmith's Rivendell seems to have very few buildings). I noticed similarities with some of the calendar pictures that Daughter of Nienna linked to earlier as well - in particular Boromir's funeral boat going over Rauros, and the look of Fangorn with bluish light coming from the depths of the forest. Assuming these paintings all predate the movies, it would seem that Jackson was strongly influenced by Nasmith, even if Nasmith wasn't available to work with him directly.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


Curious
Half-elven

Apr 5 2007, 4:47pm

Post #9 of 37 (756 views)
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I don't think it is any secret that Jackson [In reply to] Can't Post

studied the illustrations of LotR when planning the movie, and of course he hired Lee and Howe. I believe he wanted to hire Nasmith as well, but he wasn't available for personal reasons. I do wish that Nasmith had been available, because I think his temperment is better for Rivendell and Lothlorien than Lee's or Howe's (although I'll reserve my final opinion of Howe until we look at his illustrations later in this discussion). I don't know the movies well enough to say how closely they resemble Nasmith's illustrations as opposed to Lee's or Howe's. But all three of them are realists working with the same material, as was Jackson, so I wouldn't be surprised if Nasmith's illustrations had some influence on the movie even though he wasn't available.


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Apr 5 2007, 5:02pm

Post #10 of 37 (786 views)
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Influence or appropriation? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Assuming these paintings all predate the movies, it would seem that Jackson was strongly influenced by Nasmith, even if Nasmith wasn't available to work with him directly.


Influence I think, but in squire's "Designing Middle-earth" discussion last summer on the Movie board, he noted that there are claims --not by Nasmith-- that some film images are too much like his work.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Apr. 2-8: Ted Nasmith.


GaladrielTX
Tol Eressea


Apr 5 2007, 5:53pm

Post #11 of 37 (762 views)
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I've wondered, too, [In reply to] Can't Post

how the movies would have looked with Nasmith's participation. Then I remember somewhere in the commentary that PJ said he decided on the washed-out colors for the film. That seems to be the current style in filmmaking. So ultimately, that decision would not have been Nasmith's to make. Quite possibly, this aspect of Nasmith's talents might have been wasted. On the other hand, maybe he could have persuaded PJ to brighten up the colors a little. I guess we'll never know.

~~~~~~~~

I used to be GaladrielTX, but it's springtime and I'm shedding.



(This post was edited by Galadriel on Apr 5 2007, 5:56pm)


Curious
Half-elven

Apr 5 2007, 6:01pm

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It's really hard to say. [In reply to] Can't Post

So many of these images come straight from the book that it is hard to say whether Jackson was influenced by Nasmith or whether both of them were influenced by Tolkien. As Paul Gauguin once said, "Art is either plagiarism or revolution."


Curious
Half-elven

Apr 5 2007, 6:04pm

Post #13 of 37 (739 views)
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It would have been so great to have [In reply to] Can't Post

washed out colors everywhere except for Rivendell and Lothlorien, almost like Kansas and Oz. But that was probably too whimsical for Jackson. And with Lee as art director, no one was telling him "but Lothlorien can't be washed out!"


FarFromHome
Valinor


Apr 5 2007, 6:21pm

Post #14 of 37 (732 views)
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That's a very interesting link! [In reply to] Can't Post

I made a half-hearted attempt to do something similar with the images we're discussing (a number of which are in your link), but I gave up as it's such a lot of work. But seen side-by-side as they are in your link, the influence seems pretty clear. There's more similarity than you'd expect the common material to produce - similarities of scene composition and point of view that are not a part of Tolkien's descriptions.

However, at least one of these movie images (the Taming of Smeagol) was explicitly copied from Alan Lee's version, not Nasmith's, according to the filmmakers. How much influence the various illustrators have had over each other's work is another matter, I suppose. I'm pretty sure that Nasmith was the originator of the image of the hobbits hiding from the Black Rider under a tree-root, for example, which Jackson also copied deliberately, but I think he actually was copying Bakshi, who copied Nasmith...

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


GaladrielTX
Tol Eressea


Apr 5 2007, 6:28pm

Post #15 of 37 (731 views)
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Hope I'm not getting too off topic here, [In reply to] Can't Post

but your idea reminded me of something someone on TORN said, way back before Fellowship came out. This poster had an idea of how a director could show the different way time operates within Lorien. As the Fellowship was fleeing the Orcs and entering the woods, the Fellowship could be moving at a normal pace, with leaves falling at a normal rate, but the Orcs pursuing them would be shown in slower and slower motion.

I always thought that would be interesting, although it's probably not necessary to the plot and might only confuse viewers.

~~~~~~~~

I used to be GaladrielTX, but it's springtime and I'm shedding.



GaladrielTX
Tol Eressea


Apr 5 2007, 6:30pm

Post #16 of 37 (730 views)
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But that image... [In reply to] Can't Post

of people hiding under the tree root: I swear it comes straight out of King Kong. Was Nasmith copying that old movie classic?

~~~~~~~~

I used to be GaladrielTX, but it's springtime and I'm shedding.



Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Apr 5 2007, 6:41pm

Post #17 of 37 (739 views)
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for most of those images [In reply to] Can't Post

can be found similar images in the work of Alan Lee, and/or John Howe that also predates the films and match the film of these same scenes. like: Lee also previously painted Stone Trolls and designed the sets for the films. And, Howe did a better painting (IMO) of the 'At the Ford'.

So, the argumant doesn't enitrely hold water. In, some cases, howver, it does, like: Nazmith's Caladhras scene.

Bottom line...I think all three had influence. I am not sure an accusaton of appropriation could hold up (though Caladhras comes close) but visionary influence, certainly.

There are many links to art sites for Lee, Nazmith and Howe in my footer. I have thought of going through those website to find examples of Lee & Howe for those same shots that could kill this theory. I have just had bigger things grabbing my attention.

Alan Lee Discussion week: starts March 25th in the Reading Room
Discussion Ideas, Alan Lee–Introduction, Scanned images for Alan Lee Discussion.

Art Gallery Revised, ORC pic of Hawaii friends, my drawings,
Aloha & Mahalo, Websites Directory
Nienna: “ those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta

(This post was edited by Daughter of Nienna on Apr 5 2007, 6:51pm)


Daughter of Nienna
Grey Havens


Apr 5 2007, 6:58pm

Post #18 of 37 (732 views)
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War of the Ring strikes again [In reply to] Can't Post

War of the Ring website is notoriously buggy.

Your links bring up different images from the same calendar. Here is the link to the calandar itself the the images to click on.

Fanghorn is the first ont (top, left)
Tol Brandir is the last one (bottom row, second image)

http://www.warofthering.net/...bnails.php?album=292

Alan Lee Discussion week: starts March 25th in the Reading Room
Discussion Ideas, Alan Lee–Introduction, Scanned images for Alan Lee Discussion.

Art Gallery Revised, ORC pic of Hawaii friends, my drawings,
Aloha & Mahalo, Websites Directory
Nienna: “ those who hearken to her learn pity, and endurance in hope . . . All those who wait in Mandos cry to her, for she brings strength to the spirit and turns sorrow to wisdom." — Valaquenta


Curious
Half-elven

Apr 5 2007, 6:59pm

Post #19 of 37 (737 views)
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Or you could use Tolkien's method, [In reply to] Can't Post

and have Sam wonder about the phase of the moon.


FarFromHome
Valinor


Apr 5 2007, 7:18pm

Post #20 of 37 (722 views)
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Thanks for correcting the links [In reply to] Can't Post

I remembered about this problem as I was writing my post, but then had to rush off and forgot to check whether the links worked.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


Altaira
Superuser / Moderator


Apr 5 2007, 8:02pm

Post #21 of 37 (718 views)
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I was going to bring that link up [In reply to] Can't Post

...on Movie, after this discussion. Smile


Koru: Maori symbol representing a fern frond as it opens. The koru reaches towards the light, striving for perfection, encouraging new, positive beginnings.



"All we have to decide is what to do with the boards that are given to us"



"I take a moment to fervently hope that the camaradarie and just plain old fun I found at TORn will never end" -- LOTR_nutcase

TORn Calendar


FarFromHome
Valinor


Apr 5 2007, 8:02pm

Post #22 of 37 (761 views)
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I wouldn't say movie-Lothlorien [In reply to] Can't Post

is washed-out. It's just dark. But I agree that that was a decision made for dramatic purposes rather than for simple appearance's sake. Jackson didn't want to let the tension drop as it does in the book, and so wanted Lothlorien to be darker in tone and mood than it is in the book. Still, once Frodo has had his moment with Galadriel and discovered that she isn't so dangerous after all, the mood does change, and the Farewell to Lorien scene in the movie is as light in colour as Nasmith's (in fact I think it looks very similar to Nasmith's, except that it's mistier).

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Apr 5 2007, 8:24pm

Post #23 of 37 (758 views)
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I especially love the Rivendell painting. [In reply to] Can't Post

It reminds me so much of some places I love in RL. I love how he remained true to Tolkien's illustration but made it "real", with that rich light and color. Nasmith is so good at landscapes. I like some of his people, (Boromir is very good), but others just look odd to me (Legolas, for example.) But his landscapes are gorgeous.

I haven't answered any of the questions you posed; I'm rather like some of my students, who when they don't know the answer to my question will ramble on about something only vaguely related.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Chance Meeting at Rivendell: a Tolkien Fanfic
and some other stuff I wrote...
leleni at hotmail dot com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Apr 5 2007, 8:33pm

Post #24 of 37 (717 views)
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Sorry! [In reply to] Can't Post

Didn't mean to step on your toes. Perhaps you could still bring the question to Movie when you're done here?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Detail from earliest version of Thror's MapTolkien Illustrated! Jan. 29-May 20: Visit the Reading Room to discuss art by John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith and others, including Tolkien himself.

Apr. 2-8: Ted Nasmith.


Altaira
Superuser / Moderator


Apr 5 2007, 9:57pm

Post #25 of 37 (714 views)
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No problema! [In reply to] Can't Post

(Lurking Girl would be proud of me). Laugh

Oh, I don't mind that you brought it up at all. I found it when preparing this discussion and just thought it would fit better on Movie. I think I will go ahead and post it over yonder, probably this weekend. Smile


Koru: Maori symbol representing a fern frond as it opens. The koru reaches towards the light, striving for perfection, encouraging new, positive beginnings.



"All we have to decide is what to do with the boards that are given to us"



"I take a moment to fervently hope that the camaradarie and just plain old fun I found at TORn will never end" -- LOTR_nutcase

TORn Calendar

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