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The One Ring Forums: Off Topic: Off Topic:
It was the best of times; it was the worst of times; it was the weekly "what've you been reading?" thread!
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a.s.
Valinor


May 28 2008, 10:55am

Post #1 of 44 (317 views)
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It was the best of times; it was the worst of times; it was the weekly "what've you been reading?" thread! Can't Post

So I was explaining yesterday to a young acquaintance that Tolkien fans, on the whole, are also people who read other books for pleasure and who read more books than the average non-Tolkien fan. Do you think that's a sustainable argument?



It could just be my impression from reading weekly book reports for the last several years from fellow Torn members, but we just never seem to run out of good books to recommend to other readers (plus an occasional stinker!). I also belong to a bricks-and-mortar book club which has become a really fun and interesting group, because no matter what our assigned book is we always somehow get off the subject and onto other books as well. And boy, does that hour go by fast!

But I like our little weekly book reports, too, as I get lots of ideas for "my next book".

So, this week I devoured The Silver Swan, a new mystery by Benjamin Black, which is a pseudonym for John Banville. Many critics seem to feel this is inferior to his first "noir" crime novel featuring a pathologist in 1950s Ireland ("Christine Falls") but I liked it somewhat better. Well, I read it all in one long day, and when I can't do anything but read a book which I carry around all day in one hand while simultaneously trying to do stuff (like cook or load the dishwasher) with the other hand, I figure I really liked it! A tad too much dependence on coincidence, but not enough to spoil my read. I give this a grade A.

Other than that, it's been a slow reading week for me because of the weekend holiday and family gatherings (I do get my nose out of a book now and again!) I'm now about halfway through Barchester Towers and loving it. I still like the intrusive narrator, too. In fact, I love how modern the writing feels, and sometimes come on a passage I have a hard time thinking was written 130 years ago...which just goes to show I need to read more stuff from 130 years ago, I think!

That's it for me. What about you all? What have you been reading this week?

a.s.

"an seileachan"



"It doesn't happen all at once," said the Skin Horse. "You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand."

"I suppose you are real?" said the Rabbit. And then he wished he had not said it, for he thought the Skin Horse might be sensitive.

But the Skin Horse only smiled.



Artanis
Rohan


May 28 2008, 11:31am

Post #2 of 44 (118 views)
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Hi, new here [In reply to] Can't Post

and I'm really glad there is a thread about what everyone is reading.Smile

I'm reading The Hobbit at the minute.......just got to the bit where Bilbo says "The eagles are coming"....I really like that bit Blush.

I have on order (actually its been dispatched today..yipeee) a George Macdonald Treasury. I have never read any of his stuff before and although I'm exited that it should arrive just in time for me to have finished The Hobbit I am a little nervous as to what to expect. Anybody read any of his books, can you share your thoughts?

I have also been trying to read Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, but I'm having trouble sticking with it and I'm wondering whether I should stick with it Crazy?

Lastly I know these are supposedly childrens books, but I picked up a set by Brian Jacques for my son called the Redwall series, he hasn't started them yet but I am intrigued as to whether they are good read anyway...even though aimed at children?

Thanks!


deej
Tol Eressea


May 28 2008, 1:14pm

Post #3 of 44 (88 views)
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'The Diamond Age' by Neal Stephenson [In reply to] Can't Post

Cyberpunk-type stuff about a nanotech engineer living in a neo-Victorian society who steals a copy of a book called 'The Young Ladies Illustrated Primer' that's actually a super computer capable of teaching someone everything they would need to know to become successful and independant. I'm only a couple of chapters into it, but so far it's very interesting.


"...and back again."



RosieLass
Valinor


May 28 2008, 2:01pm

Post #4 of 44 (82 views)
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Welcome! [In reply to] Can't Post

This thread has my comments and others' replies about "The Princess and the Goblin," by George MacDonald.

http://newboards.theonering.net/...b=post_time;so=DESC;

Do keep working on "Sense and Sensibility." It's not my favorite, but it's definitely worth the effort.

I have read only one Jacques book, "Redwall," and I didn't much care for it, but I think that's because when I read it I thought it was written for adults and I was disappointed at how childish it was. If I had known it was a kiddie book, I would have had different expectations, and my opinion might have been different.

Sad News. :(

With all the sadness and trauma going on in the world at the moment, it is worth reflecting on the death of a very important person, which almost went unnoticed.

Larry LaPrise, the man who wrote "The Hokey Pokey" died peacefully at the age of 83. The most traumatic part for his family was getting him into the coffin. They put his left leg in. And then the trouble started.


http://mallika.vox.com/


RosieLass
Valinor


May 28 2008, 2:06pm

Post #5 of 44 (82 views)
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Donna Leon [In reply to] Can't Post

I read the latest Commissario Guido Brunetti mystery, "The Girl of His Dreams," by Donna Leon.

It was a great improvement over the last couple. I don't know if Leon changed editors or tried to change herself, but the last couple Brunettis didn't sound like her. The writing was choppy and the plots were handled awkwardly.

This one was better. The prose was still a little plodding (a lot of descriptions of walking across the floor or climbing the stairs, etc.), and not quite the crisp writing of the earlier books. But much improved.

The story was all right. It was a mix of two subplots, neither of which was very strong. A friend of Brunetti's brother asks him to look into the leader of a religious group, whom he believes is a fraud. And a young girl is found dead, floating in a canal. Neither plot was particularly compelling, and neither solution was particularly satisfying. I never figure out whodunnit anyway, but nobody would have in this one, as the murderer never appears as a character, and you don't even hear about him until the last couple chapters.

I was a little afraid to read this one, because of the religious aspect. Leon has very strong feelings about the church and the military, so much so that she sometimes lets it get the better of her plotting. In one book, she was so busy hating the church that she forgot to wind up her plot. And in another she lay blame for the murder on the fact that the victim and the perpetrators were members of the the military, when clearly it had more to do with abuse of wealth and social status.

One of the things I like best about the Leon books is the lovely, healthy relationship Brunetti has with his family. His wife Paola, however, is a b*tch, and my strong dislike of her grows with every book. I don't want Leon to kill her, because that would hurt Brunetti and the rest of the family. And I guess it wouldn't realistic to expect her to stop writing about Paola, either, since the Brunetti family relationship is such an intrinsic part of each story.

But I wouldn't miss her if she never appeared in the books again. It's not because she has different beliefs and values than I do. So does Brunetti himself, and I don't hate him. It's the way Paola is so scornful and dismissive of people who have different beliefs than she. She sneers at the American government for something she doesn't like, while yet another privileged son of a wealthy family is allowed to get away with murder because the police are afraid to cross Daddy, who is a high ranking member of the Italian government.

Clean your own house first, then you can come criticize mine. Okay?

Sad News. :(

With all the sadness and trauma going on in the world at the moment, it is worth reflecting on the death of a very important person, which almost went unnoticed.

Larry LaPrise, the man who wrote "The Hokey Pokey" died peacefully at the age of 83. The most traumatic part for his family was getting him into the coffin. They put his left leg in. And then the trouble started.


http://mallika.vox.com/

(This post was edited by RosieLass on May 28 2008, 2:08pm)


Artanis
Rohan


May 28 2008, 2:24pm

Post #6 of 44 (73 views)
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RosieLass [In reply to] Can't Post

oohh thanks for the link.

Thanks also for the comments on the Redwal series, I shall bear them in mind if I ever do read them. I read Pride and Prejudice just the end of last year and found that okay so why I can't get into this one I'm not sure, but I shall renew my effort with Sense and Sensibility Angelic !! Thanks for the recommendation!

Artanis


Elberbeth
Tol Eressea


May 28 2008, 3:00pm

Post #7 of 44 (64 views)
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A Night of Rain and Stars, Maeve Binchy and others [In reply to] Can't Post

The Binchy book was fairly short, but I always like her gentle, low-key writing.

The others were abridged stories (somehow a Readers' Digest book appeared from nowhere):
Michael Connelly's The Overlook: the latest of his Harry Bosch books, worked very well as a short story.
James Patterson's Step on a Crack: hostage-taking in NY blended with a negotiator whose wife is dying of cancer. Perhaps the complete book would have run together better. Not bad.
Elizabeth Adler's Meet Me in Venice: didn't work for me at all, I almost didn't finish it.
Patrick Taylor, An Irish Country Doctor. I like this quite a lot, reminded me of Herriott except he's an MD, not a DVM. I'd like to read the complete book sometime. Enjoyed seeing a couple of references to Tolkien in it too!

"There are some things that it is better to begin than to refuse, even though the end may be dark."


acheron
Gondor


May 28 2008, 3:03pm

Post #8 of 44 (79 views)
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Stephenson [In reply to] Can't Post

I like The Diamond Age, though it probably took me around 5 times reading it before I understood everything that is going on.

Have you read any other Stephenson? I absolutely love Cryptonomicon.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Annael
Half-elven


May 28 2008, 3:06pm

Post #9 of 44 (77 views)
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"Black Sheep" by Georgette Heyer [In reply to] Can't Post

they are slowly re-releasing all the Georgette Heyer books in trade paperback format, and as they do I buy them and read them. This one appears to be a variation on "Lady of Quality" which I already have. Heyer does have a few character types she pulls out over and over, although she doesn't repeat her plots - unless you count the fact that all obstacles are overcome in the penultimate chapter and those who love each other get to marry. Her heroes are either 1. a callow but essentially good-hearted youth; 2. a paragon who has avoided matrimony until his late 30s; or 3. a libertine almost-but-not-quite-cast-off-from-society. All of these, of course, are changed forever - the youth grows up, the paragon embraces matrimony, the libertine reforms - by meeting the ideal woman. Who is either 1. an innocent young girl new to society; 2. a woman of 28 who thinks she is past the age of marrying: or 3, a young woman of strongly independent mind who doesn't flatter and pursue the hero in the least, instead annoys him. (Yes, she got that one from Jane Austen.)

I've been amusing myself by thinking that the only modern-day society that would come anywhere near to the rigid social mores and exclusivity of the Regency ton that Heyer describes and so many other authors imitate would be: a suburban American high school! There you have your ruling class of the socially acceptable that is almost impossible to get into unless you too come from a family of wealth and power. This ruling class follows strict rules for behavior, appearance, and speech; those who violate these rules in any way are gossiped about and may be shunned. Next to being from a "good family," appearance is vital; those who dress in the latest and most expensive style and are known to use the most exclusive "modistes" - that is, brand names - are envied and copied. Mating rituals are highly stylized and while the boys may all want the "Cyprians" - the girls of easy virtue - as a whole the society sniggers at them.

To do her credit Heyer makes fun of the snooty and snobbish and obviously likes best the people who, despite having wealth and beauty and impeccable fashion taste, prefer to read and think and are at heart compassionate and secretly do good works among the poor; they are not happy until they find partners who also read and think and are kind.

[Love] may be merely a device to put us in contact with the mystery, and we long for love to last so that the ecstasy of being near the mystery will last. It is contrary to the nature of mystery to stand still. Yet it's always there, somewhere, a world on the other side of the mirror, a promise in the next pair of eyes that smile at us. We glimpse it when we stand still. . . . When it comes to perpetuating it, however, I got no advice. But I can and will remind you of two of the most important facts I know:
- Everything is part of it.
-It's never too later to have a happy childhood.
- Tom Robbins
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967


grammaboodawg
Immortal


May 28 2008, 4:40pm

Post #10 of 44 (70 views)
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I've been listening to books of CD of Harry Potter (spoilers CoS & HBP) [In reply to] Can't Post

at work whilst... uh... working. I finished Half Blood Prince and am into Deathly Hallows again. Now, I know there are some majorly knowledgeable people out there of all things Potter, but I'm just enjoying the books. I wanted to ask about this...

In the Chamber of Secrets, Ginny was taken over/controlled by Tom Riddle/Voldemort when she had the diary and poured her heart out to it. After Harry saved her (by the start of HBP), he began to notice her and she'd become very popular AND was an awesome quidditch player... a lot more like Harry. So, do you think that because they both had been touched by Riddle, they became more alike and were drawn to each other? She also makes me think that she'd become a lot like Lily (Harry's Mom).

Just a thought.



sample sample
Trust him... The Hobbit is coming!

"Barney Snow was here." ~Hug like a hobbit!~ "In my heaven..."


TORn's Observations Lists


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


May 28 2008, 5:20pm

Post #11 of 44 (74 views)
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"A Second Chance' by our own Kimi! [In reply to] Can't Post

A Second Chance

This is a sequel to her trilogy Promises to Keep, set in New Zealand about a hundred years ago. The trilogy was fascinating, but pretty dark, and though I found it a page-turner and very moving, it was also almost too dark for me.

The sequel has much more light in it, and I really loved it. The whole thing is like the eucatastrophe at the end of the other story, in fact, I don't think the story is complete without this book. There was a "sudden turn of joy" at the end of the trilogy, but here there's a lot more joy, and I had a great time reading it.

I got off to a slow start, because I'm not reading much these days, as I'm writing my own novel (which is pouring out at about 100 pages a month), and editing some of my others. But once I reached the halfway point, I read until the wee hours. I finished at 1 AM and then had to get up at 5:30, so if I make mistakes in my classes today, it's all Kimi's fault ;-)

For some reason this novel reminded me a bit of Little Women (in fact, there's a great scene in which a baby is named for one of the Little Women characters). There's a character who leaves the farm and goes off to the big city, and takes us on a wide-eyed tour of life in Auckland in 1900-something (a time my great-aunt called "the naughties"). It's great to watch her wonder at the modern miracles of electric lights and indoor plumbing.

There's so much comfort in this book; if you're the kind of person like me, who enjoys the "stop and have a party" chapters of LotR, you might love this one. There is some conflict too, as villians get their just desserts (yay!) and a bit of tragedy on the side (sniff). But mostly it's full of joy, which is the kind of book I love.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Entwife Wandlimb
Lorien


May 28 2008, 5:29pm

Post #12 of 44 (75 views)
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A False Mirror by Charles Todd, Prince Caspian and French Lesson by Mayle [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm almost finished with French Lessons: Adventures with Knife, Fork, and Corkscrew by Peter Mayle. Each chapter stands alone as a humorous but reverent account of his Foodie travels through France. Right now, I'm on a fascinating chapter about the history of the Michelin guidebooks. My book club had dinner at a French restaraunt in honor of this book. His description of escargot had me seriously considering ordering some, but I opted for something a bit safer in the end.

I reread Prince Caspian after watching the movie. While enjoyable, I think the writers did well in making most of their changes for the film. I'd forgotten the nice bit where Aslan heals Caspian's old nurse who had loved him and taught him of Aslan. My husband wanted me to find a couple of the lines that he found annoyingly misquoted:

“But every year you grow, you will find me bigger.”

“To know that would have happened, child? No. Nobody is ever told that. But anyone can find out what will happen. If you go back to the others now, and wake them up; and tell that you have seen me again; and that you mst all get up at once and follow me—what will happen? There is only one way of finding out.”

The book is much sweeter than the movie, with Peter being pretty much completely at peace with himself and Caspian. Susan does shoot a man right off the bat to save Trumpkin, but it's clear from the book that she deliberately didn't shoot to kill. She is definately Susan the Gentle. What's so nice about the book is that there is a lot of realistic, child-like problems. For instance:


“He also learned a great deal by using his own eyes and ears. As a little boy he had often wondered why he disliked his aunt, Queen Prunaprismia; he now saw that it was because she disliked him.”

“It is a terrible thing to have to wake four people, all older than yourself and all very tired, for the purpose of telling them something they probably won't believe and making them do something they certainly won’t like. ‘I mustn’t think about it, I must just do it,’ thought Lucy.”

Never my favorite Narnia book (perhaps because there is so much wandering about in the woods, kind of like the book is stuck in Dr. Seuss's Waiting Place from Oh THe Places You'll Go. It's also hard to let go of Peter and Susan and get used to Caspian. That may have been the hardest thing about the Narnia series for me -- I didn't like to see favorite characters go and it took me a while to warm up to new ones.

A False Mirror is the ninth Inspector Ian Rutledge mystery, all set in post-WWI England. While the series in general is probably my favorite mystery series right now, I found some elements of the plot of this one extremely farfetched and so didn't enjoy it as much as its predecessors.


Entwife Wandlimb
Lorien


May 28 2008, 5:45pm

Post #13 of 44 (77 views)
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interesting! [In reply to] Can't Post

I had never thought about Riddle influencing them in that way. I suppose it's possible but I rather think it was a matter of maturity.

Below is a quote from the end of Half Blood Prince. I'm pretty sure you've read it but in case you haven't, it is a very small spoiler.

warning -
spoiler quote below

‘I never really gave up on you,’ she said. ‘Not really. I always hoped ... Hermione told me to get on with life, maybe go out with some other people, relax a bit around you, because I never used to be able to talk if you were in the room, remember? And she thought you might take a bit more notice if I was a bit more - myself.’

’Smart girl, that Hermione,’ said Harry.

So, it sounds to me like Ginny became more self-confident, more herself, rather than more like Riddle.


Patty
Immortal


May 28 2008, 6:15pm

Post #14 of 44 (53 views)
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Just finished Tied Up in Tinsel, and Inspector Alleyn mystery, BBC's LotR [In reply to] Can't Post

remind me NEVER to buy a cassette again. If I can't get it on CD it's a no-purchase. Tape 4 of 6 tapes was almost completely inaudible on one side. From what I could tell of the story, then, it was very good. As I said last week, Ngaio Marsh does eccentric characters well.

Now I am listening to the BBC audio LotR in preparation for next week's discussion that Idril is leading on the 2nd. Put that disc in and join us, audiobook lovers!

Hanging out with the Lonely Isle elves.


One Ringer
Tol Eressea


May 28 2008, 7:14pm

Post #15 of 44 (58 views)
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Picked "The Children of Hurin" up again . . . [In reply to] Can't Post

Now that all of my projects are done, I was able to sit down and enjoy another chapter of CoH.

*possible spoilers*

I was really upset to see Mim betray Turin like that; all for being a little jealous. Well, atleast Turin is still alive, and Beleg got away, however, that all ended when I read the title of the next chapter. Unsure

Still, it's a lot of fun reading it! Hopefully once summer comes around I'll finish it off. After that, I'll see where things go. Smile

Ash nazg durbatulûk, Ash nazg gimbatul,
Ash nazg thrakatulûk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

(This post was edited by One Ringer on May 28 2008, 7:15pm)


Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


May 28 2008, 7:15pm

Post #16 of 44 (70 views)
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In reply to your question, I got a kick a while back [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
So I was explaining yesterday to a young acquaintance that Tolkien fans, on the whole, are also people who read other books for pleasure and who read more books than the average non-Tolkien fan. Do you think that's a sustainable argument?


when I read "The Jane Austen Book Club", and one of her discussion questions at the end was about the fact that Jane Austen fans and science fiction fans seem to form groups and want to talk about the books, and she wondered if there were any other authors that provoked that kind of reaction. I thought, well, yeah.... ;-)

I don't know about your argument, but I wouldn't be surprised. Years ago I ran across a woman wearing elf ears and asked her if she was a Tolkien fan. She said "Oh, I loathe him. He uses too many words." (!) So maybe those of us who think Tolkien doesn't use too many words are comfortable with reading lots of words in general.

btw, how's your knee coming?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



grammaboodawg
Immortal


May 28 2008, 7:30pm

Post #17 of 44 (53 views)
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Yeah... I smiled at that [In reply to] Can't Post

and I think it did have an influence on her to try... but there are so many similiarities between them (she's not weepy, she understands what he "must do" before he even voices it, etc.) I think the encouragement settled her enough to open up and trust.

Fersher maturity; and her influence over him was more than infatuation... ;)



sample sample
Trust him... The Hobbit is coming!

"Barney Snow was here." ~Hug like a hobbit!~ "In my heaven..."


TORn's Observations Lists


deej
Tol Eressea


May 28 2008, 8:18pm

Post #18 of 44 (49 views)
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I haven't read any of his other books. [In reply to] Can't Post

But he's been recommended to me by a few friends, so I think i'm going to have to!


"...and back again."



RosieLass
Valinor


May 28 2008, 8:22pm

Post #19 of 44 (39 views)
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I'm listening to the "French Lessons" audiobook. [In reply to] Can't Post

Read by Simon Jones. Once you get past hearing Arthur Dent reading to you, it's very entertaining. It's a fabulous, funny book, and it makes things I wouldn't eat with a ten-foot fork sound appetizing. Jones' reading is excellent. I wish I could find more of Mayle's books as audiobooks; especially his Provence books.

I'm pretty close to the end. He and his wife are visiting Eugénie les Bains, taking the cure after his year of gastronomic excess. Cool

Sad News. :(

With all the sadness and trauma going on in the world at the moment, it is worth reflecting on the death of a very important person, which almost went unnoticed.

Larry LaPrise, the man who wrote "The Hokey Pokey" died peacefully at the age of 83. The most traumatic part for his family was getting him into the coffin. They put his left leg in. And then the trouble started.


http://mallika.vox.com/


a.s.
Valinor


May 28 2008, 8:59pm

Post #20 of 44 (51 views)
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wonderfully bendable, thanks for asking!! [In reply to] Can't Post

My knee is coming along well, I am walking without a cane (trying not to limp, which they tell me is just a habit now and I need to STOP!! LOL) and it is taking me back to work next week (along with the rest of my body--and my mind as well, I hope)!

I am getting quite used to afternoon naps, though, so it's probably going to be hard to transition back to the work experience. Oh well. All good things come to an end, including medical leave.

Cool

a.s.

"an seileachan"



"It doesn't happen all at once," said the Skin Horse. "You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand."

"I suppose you are real?" said the Rabbit. And then he wished he had not said it, for he thought the Skin Horse might be sensitive.

But the Skin Horse only smiled.



Aunt Dora Baggins
Half-elven


May 28 2008, 9:16pm

Post #21 of 44 (61 views)
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LOL!! [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
it is taking me back to work next week (along with the rest of my body--and my mind as well, I hope)!


Glad to hear it's behaving as it should :-)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


May 29 2008, 12:10am

Post #22 of 44 (64 views)
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After my little toe healed from a break [In reply to] Can't Post

I found I had to retrain myself to not limp. It's amazing how easily your muscles pick up a bad habit.

I'm glad your knee is operating as per the manual! :)

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Revie
Rivendell


May 29 2008, 12:45am

Post #23 of 44 (52 views)
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Rebecca by Du Maurier [In reply to] Can't Post

At first glance, the cover of this book had me almost putting it back, because it looks like a Harlequin Romance cover, or at least a Danielle Steele cover. :P My co-worker swore it was an excellent book so I went ahead and started it and was pleasantly surprised. Very dramatic, very creepy, and plot twists to keep you guessing right to the end. I see other readers on GoodReads drawing parallels to Jane Eyre with this story and I think they are quite right to do so. I was irritated at first with the young bride - she is so passive, so mousy you just want to scream at her to grow a backbone! But I got sucked into the story and couldn't put it down. A great beach read (or pool-side, if you don't have a beach).

a.s., I don't know if the Tolkien fan vs non-Tolkien fan theory would hold up at the library where I work. If it's one common denominator amongst the staff, it's a love of books. And I think it's safe to say that I'm pretty alone in my Tolkien obsession.

Dymer's Dream: A Graphics Journal


(This post was edited by Revie on May 29 2008, 12:54am)


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator


May 29 2008, 12:58am

Post #24 of 44 (45 views)
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*Tries to look guilty* [In reply to] Can't Post

*over keeping you awake*

*Fails miserably* :-)

I'm a wicked person. I love hearing I kept people awake reading and/or made them cry (and laugh).

I'm so glad you enjoyed it! If I were to sum up this book in one word, it would be "payback" (which can be a good thing as well as a you-know-what). It was very, very satisfying to write.


My writing (including The Passing of Mistress Rose)

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Annael
Half-elven


May 29 2008, 1:21am

Post #25 of 44 (47 views)
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have you ever [In reply to] Can't Post

walked next to a person who is limping and, after a bit, find yourself limping too? The mind takes suggestion far too easily sometimes.

[Love] may be merely a device to put us in contact with the mystery, and we long for love to last so that the ecstasy of being near the mystery will last. It is contrary to the nature of mystery to stand still. Yet it's always there, somewhere, a world on the other side of the mirror, a promise in the next pair of eyes that smile at us. We glimpse it when we stand still. . . . When it comes to perpetuating it, however, I got no advice. But I can and will remind you of two of the most important facts I know:
- Everything is part of it.
-It's never too later to have a happy childhood.
- Tom Robbins
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967

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