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***Favorite Chapters - The Window on the West (LOTR)



demnation
NahoR

Dec 3 2019, 3:06am


Views: 2172
***Favorite Chapters - The Window on the West (LOTR)

Some musings:

I always like how Tolkien often introduces new characters with an air of mistrust. At the beginning of the chapter, we're truly waiting with baited breathe to see if Faramir is like his brother.

There is some ambiguity as the whether Faramir actually saw his brothers body or not. I myself am not fully satisfied with this but I suppose its moot since we as the reader know that Boromir is gone.

Faramir does consider that duty requires him to present the hobbits to his father, but instantly dismisses it. (in comparison to his film counterpart)

We find out a bit about Gandalfs history, his many names and his search for the ring.

Some questions:
what do you like/dislike about this chapter?

Frodo and Sam feel that it is likely that they are the last survivors of the company. In what ways do you feel this affects them going forward?

Was this a good time for Tolkien to do a bit of an info dump about Gondor? and more important reveal quite a bit about Boromir's character?

Did Sam really screw up by mentioning the ring?

Is Faramir truly a man of quality?

Smile

"It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succour of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till. What weather they shall have is not ours to rule." Gandalf, "The Last Debate."


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 3 2019, 3:22am


Views: 2063
It could be said that

The Lord of the Rings is structured as a series of journeys between havens. Crickhollow, Bombadil's, Bree, Rivendell, Lorien and now Henneth Annun. The havens can be said to be as important as the journeys, because they do represent a place for Frodo and the reader to take a breath, to meet people, to learn about the world they are in (and Middle-earth is a character in this book, as much as Galadriel or Faramir are). Note that for Frodo, this is the last haven he'll have until the Field of Cormallen- he is about to start his 17 consecutive days in, literally, Hell.

So, even with the frisson of can-we-trust-Boromirs-brother? in the background, nonetheless I think we as well as Frodo find a roof, a fire, a hot meal, wine, a guard of armed men to be a surprising comfort on the edge of the abyss. (There is even a hope, for first-timers, that he's rid of Gollum)

No, I don't mind Faramir taking Gandalf's role as Captain Loredump- I perhaps could wish that T were somehow slightly more artful about it - but almost nothing about the following Book V would have as much impact if we didn't know who the Gondorians were, their significance, their grief, their decay. And their nobility- manifest above all in Faramir.

The camera need NOT always be in kinetic motion. Nor do conflicts have to be overt.


(This post was edited by Solicitr on Dec 3 2019, 3:30am)


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 3 2019, 2:09pm


Views: 2000
Literature's coolest hideout?

Thanks for doing this one, demnation!

I'm not sure if anyone in literature has a cooler hideout than Faramir. Maybe it's not surprising. Tolkien seems to like to make his Captain of Men characters leaders of resistance/commando/outlaw/scout bands. (He does it for Beren and Turin as well as Faramir. And Tolkien also seems to love writing secret places, often underground ones, and especially ones with defensive features. So two parts of his imagination can get to work in this chapter.

~~~~~~
"Go down to the shovel store and take your pick." Traditional prank played on dwarves when they start down the mine.


uncle Iorlas
Neirol


Dec 3 2019, 9:18pm


Views: 1973
last things first

Not to ignore the other questions, this is a great favorite chapter of mine as well, and it lives in my memory mostly distilled into its nearly-final moment, when Frodo, on the edge of exhaustion, guilelessly confesses his full mission and his own hopelessness in it. We hear so little about Frodo's mind from his own mouth, as the mission wears on, but instead spend more and more time watching him anxiously from Sam's POV. That even Frodo, who's been behaving quite sensibly since Bree, should let down his guard so far speaks eloquently, both to his end-of-rope state of mind, and to the degree to which Faramir has satisfied him that he's fairly safe for a moment.

The last time, as Solicitr says. Hereafter sanctuary gets no better than the odd culvert or fortress full of dead bodies not yet regarrisoned.


N.E. Brigand
Nevle-flah


Dec 4 2019, 12:03am


Views: 1961
Faramir is the Window on the West.

That point was made on these forums long ago and was on my mind last week as I pondered the meaning of "The Mirror of Galadriel" (but didn't have time to post).


Treachery, treachery I fear; treachery of that miserable creature.

But so it must be. Let us remember that a traitor may betray himself and do good that he does not intend.


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Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 4 2019, 2:34am


Views: 1941
Great point!

Faramir is one of Tolkien's great characters. Here perhaps in purer form than with any other Tolkien showed it is too possible to write a completely noble character unironically - and make him interesting and even likeable. And he gives us that 'window' into the Dunedain: the unfulfilled promise which is yet a great promise, and not quite dead- like the line of Telperion.

Certainly a necessary counterpoint to his flawed (and rather pompous) brother and dessicated, cynical father! Faramir -and what he has to say - are why Gondor and the West are worth fighting for.


(This post was edited by Solicitr on Dec 4 2019, 2:44am)


squire
Nevle-flah


Dec 4 2019, 4:47am


Views: 1926
He's got the view of the Straight Road to the uttermost West

If I remember that discussion or one like it, it came out that Faramir is the only Gondorian to actually watch the sun set toward Numenor, and eternal Elvenhome, even if his view is through water and from underground. All the rest of Gondor - symbolically, that is to say Minas Tirith - has its view of the West blocked by the White Mountains, and spends its time addressing the darkness to the East.



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CuriousG
Nevle-flah


Dec 4 2019, 2:39pm


Views: 1875
If only Denethor and Boromir had been like Faramir

 then Minas Tirith would have been an even more appealing place. I remember one of the things that made me like Faramir was his fondness for Gandalf, and I'm sure that won points with the hobbits too.

It's quite refreshing at this point in the story to have someone speak of lofty ideals and a great kingdom. Frodo and Sam have been traveling through wastelands with an unsavory companion, and along comes Prince Charming.

I also like how Faramir is a sort of Gandalf stand-in for comforting Frodo (whom he has just met). That says a lot about his character in even the initial meeting. It also says a lot that Frodo trusts him so quickly and confides his dread to him; it's seems unlikely he would do that to a Boromir-clone.:

Quote
[Frodo]: ‘Will you not put aside your doubt of me and let me go? I am weary, and full of grief, and afraid. But I have a deed to do, or to attempt, before I too am slain. And the more need of haste, if we two halflings are all that remain of our fellowship.

‘Go back, Faramir, valiant Captain of Gondor, and defend your city while you may, and let me go where my doom takes me.’

‘For me there is no comfort in our speech together,’ said Faramir; ‘but you surely draw from it more dread than need be. Unless the people of Lórien themselves came to him, who arrayed Boromir as for a funeral? Not Orcs or servants of the Nameless. Some of your Company, I guess, live still.

I personally think Boromir's funeral boat had some special grace on it so that it survived the Falls of Rauros.

I think Sam totally blew it when he said that Boromir was after Sauron's Ring, but wasn't that a eucatastrophe? It turned out for the best, because Faramir knew they'd been withholding important information, and now he could trust them, and vice versa. And he seemed all the more resolved to help them on their way once he understood them.



(This post was edited by CuriousG on Dec 4 2019, 2:40pm)


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 4 2019, 2:40pm


Views: 1872
I like that idea too!

Pondering Chapter Titles does seem like a thing to do - several of them seem to match their text in more than one way. It's almost as if Tolkien (or his editors) did that on purpose! Wink

Perhaps we should regularly think about and multiple meanings of the chapter titles as this project goes on?

~~~~~~
"Go down to the shovel store and take your pick." Traditional prank played on dwarves when they start down the mine.


uncle Iorlas
Neirol


Dec 4 2019, 7:25pm


Views: 1856
Chapter titles

Any title is an opportunity to squeeze in a drop of content and I'm always disappointed when authors don't bother. Tolkien certainly had some fun with them--Many Meetings, Many Partings, A Long-Expected Party, An Unexpected Party--but I never caught quite such a literary use as to construe Faramir as the window. I like it. I shall be on the watch.


CuriousG
Nevle-flah


Dec 5 2019, 12:31am


Views: 1841
I have trouble coming up with a long list, but

I remember as a good example "A Knife in the Dark," which could mean the bed stabbing in The Prancing Pony, or the Black Riders attacking Crickhollow, or the Black Riders attacking Weathertop, and then it could be the Morgul-knife (most probably) or Frodo drawing his knife/sword in his futile counterattack.

But most others are pretty straightforward: I have trouble reading much into "The Old Forest" beyond that's where it takes place.


sador
Nevle-flah


Dec 5 2019, 3:18pm


Views: 1736
Were knifes involved in the attack on Crickhollow and the inn?

However, you make a good point: I do not think any chapter title (including this one!) in LotR is really open to interpretation: at most, you may have another layer of meaning - as The Shadow of the Past being also the Ring in Hobbiton, Fog on the Barrow-downs referring also to the muddle-headed behavior of the hobbits, and The Siege of Gondor reflecting also the assault on Denethor's mental state - with the apparent inexactness of the title serving as a possible hint. Perhaps Flotsam and Jetsam comes closest to having a layered meaning.
Surprisingly, in The Hobbit there are a couple of examples - and I have led discussion on both of these!
Who is 'Not_at_Home? (towards the end of the post).
A thief_in_the Night (in the middle)


Thinking about things I don't understand


sador
Nevle-flah


Dec 5 2019, 4:14pm


Views: 1732
Quality is as quality does

I always like how Tolkien often introduces new characters with an air of mistrust.
That's a nice observation! However, it seems to be the case mainly with Human characters. Gildor and Glorfindel are not introduced with mistrust. Perhaps Haldir is - but he is not a High-Elf.


There is some ambiguity as the whether Faramir actually saw his brothers body or not. I myself am not fully satisfied with this but I suppose its moot since we as the reader know that Boromir is gone.
If not Boromir, he saw an accurate vision, Galadriel's belt and all. Also, the horn was found.
In the movie, it appears to be quite ambiguous; but in the book - remember the description of the Gondorean legend in The Departure of Boromir; I would guess it was a true vision.


Faramir does consider that duty requires him to present the hobbits to his father, but instantly dismisses it. (in comparison to his film counterpart)
Yes, in the film-version he acted much more logically and lawfully.


We find out a bit about Gandalfs history, his many names and his search for the ring.
And a lot about much else, of course.


What do you like/dislike about this chapter?
I'd rather answer this question last.
As a matter of fact - in CuriousG's discussion on the previous week, I did answer this question last, but in the place he put it; however, I think it would be best for this to be the last question, rather than the first.
I will say, however, that this chapter was named by me as a possible favourite in a previous discussion. Rather than repeat myself, here_is the link.


Frodo and Sam feel that it is likely that they are the last survivors of the company. In what ways do you feel this affects them going forward?
Faramir immediately disabuses them of the notion. And it is curious and in later chapters (especially The Stairs of Cirith Ungol), Frodo thinks of Faramir more than of any of his erstwhile companions.


Was this a good time for Tolkien to do a bit of an info dump about Gondor? and more important reveal quite a bit about Boromir's character?
Well, so far we only had Elrond's account from the Council, and Boromir's. It is time we know what we are about - what it is that makes the Return of the King so important.

As some have commented in previous discussions, Boromir seems more likable and heroic after his death, as we learn what others have thought of him - Eomer, Gandalf, Théoden, Faramir and Denethor (Beregond has a slightly different take). Also Pippin.
I think this is important - and as a matter of fact, I think the creation of Faramir, which came to Tolkien nearly as an afterthought* - both reddemed the character of Boromir, and made Gondor, and by extension all Men of the West, something to admire and wish are saved.
* See Letter 66 (a paragraph I discussed here):

Quote
A new character has come on the scene (I am sure I did not invent him, I did not even want him, though I like him, but there he came walking into the woods of Ithilien): Faramir, the brother of Boromir.




Did Sam really screw up by mentioning the ring?
Yes - unless you accept Faramir's mystical: "Your heart is shrewd as well as faithful, and saw clearer than your eyes".
But that is Faramir's greatness - he successfully disarms the suspicions of Frodo, the reader and finally Sam. And it is done masterfully. If I had the time I might compare Farmir to Galadriel in the chapter we discussed in the last week - and note that both are "rewarded" with a chance to prove their quality!


Is Faramir truly a man of quality?
I would say yes.





By the way - other things I like in this chapter are the stunning scenery (which will be complemented in the beginning of the next chapter), the description of the meal, and comparison of cultures, and also how Gollum is nearly forgotten - but as we will see in the next chapter, not by Faramir.


Thank you, demnation, for this discussion!


Thinking about things I don't understand


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 5 2019, 6:10pm


Views: 1720
But also a quality interregator?

When this chapter came up in the last read through, Darkstone did a great job of persuading me that Faramir might (genunely) be a gentleman, but his actions also work well as a means of interrogation. He gains the hobbits' confidence, and is very willing (perhaps a bit suspiciously willing?) to imagine that blame in any quarrel lay with Boromir. He finishes by feasting the hobbits, including alcohol - the essential role of hospitality in several Middle-earth cultures perhaps, but the food and drink and feeling of being safe is going to hit the hobits hard when they've been doing long marches on short rations in hostile country. I think that might all contribute to Sam's indiscretion, revealing what it is that Frodo carries. .

But in the end, I think the point is that Faramir does the right thing whether he got there by interrogator's wiles or superior gentlemanliness (or both of them at once).

~~~~~~
"Go down to the shovel store and take your pick." Traditional prank played on dwarves when they start down the mine.


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 5 2019, 7:46pm


Views: 1713
Subject


In Reply To
Faramir does consider that duty requires him to present the hobbits to his father, but instantly dismisses it. (in comparison to his film counterpart)

In Reply To
Yes, in the film-version he acted much more logically and lawfully.



Until he gets to Osgiliath, where he goes utterly insane.

Also, while having his men beat Gollum to a pulp might arguably have been logical, it was hardly lawful.


(This post was edited by Solicitr on Dec 5 2019, 7:47pm)


InTheChair
Neirol

Dec 5 2019, 9:18pm


Views: 1696
Boats and horns alike are bent on bringing news to near kin, and streams and currents be damned

There is something about English that I do not fully know. The Anduin is a great river, but this chapter includes passages like, I rose and went down to the bank, and began to walk out in the stream. Maybe the word stream can be used to describe the shores of a river? Explaining also why Faramir could simply walk along the bottom. Although later, The boat turned into the stream and passed glimmering into the night, so perhaps stream refers to the current in the middle of the river? Still there is a bit of dream quality over the whole experience, so I am willing to accept whatever the meaning.

Noted upon re-reading that Boromirs corps seems to be fully or partially submerged in water in the boat. I had forgotten this.


There's a nice throwback to the chapter Lothlorien, where Boromir said, few come out who once goes in, and of that few none have escaped unscathed. To which Aragorn replies, Say not unscathed, but if you say unchanged, then maybe you will speak the truth.

Faramir on his first try say, few of old came thence unchanged, tis said.

Tolkien is not holding back the hints. Assuming one can remember as far back as Lothlorien.


Read only half the chapter today. Will read the rest tomorrow.


(This post was edited by InTheChair on Dec 5 2019, 9:19pm)


Otaku-sempai
Latrommi


Dec 5 2019, 9:54pm


Views: 1691
Streams

Stream can refer to a (small) river as a whole, or it can mean the water of the river. In the one passage we can assume that the river was shallow enough near the bank in that part of it to allow one to walk into the stream. Turning into the stream would indeed be turning into the current.

#FidelityToTolkien


sparrowruth
Llednevir


Dec 6 2019, 4:28pm


Views: 1591
mods up //

 


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 6 2019, 6:16pm


Views: 1582
Thanks! *bows modestly* //

 

~~~~~~
"Go down to the shovel store and take your pick." Traditional prank played on dwarves when they start down the mine.


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 6 2019, 6:23pm


Views: 1586
Thinking about Sam in contrast to Frodo

I'm thinking it's 'being guided by your heart' versus 'being guided by your head'.

Frodo tries to save the situation by using his wits, but Sam becomes so indignant on Frodo's behalf that he scolds Faramir (to the amusement of Faramir's men). Later he becomes so unguarded that he blurts about the Ring. And that turns out to work well. So heart 1: head 0

Maybe the next chapter reverses that - Sam is all for the wrong choice of letting the Men shoot Gollum.

But we probably ought not to discuss Forbidden Pool much now - surely it is someone's favourite chater , and they will shortly put it in the queue.... Angelic

~~~~~~
"Go down to the shovel store and take your pick." Traditional prank played on dwarves when they start down the mine.


InTheChair
Neirol

Dec 6 2019, 7:53pm


Views: 1587
Isildurs bane

I wonder how much Faramir already guessed before Sam spilled the beans.

He even mentions to Frodo his knowledge of legends that Isildur took something from Saurons hand, and his guess that this was what lay between Frodo and Boromir. And later when Sam is careless, he knows immidiately what the enemys ring is, so he obviously had knowledge of it, but if he made the right guess before he kept it to himself.


N.E. Brigand
Nevle-flah


Dec 7 2019, 5:09am


Views: 1540
"The Departure of Boromir": an echo of "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth"? //

 


Treachery, treachery I fear; treachery of that miserable creature.

But so it must be. Let us remember that a traitor may betray himself and do good that he does not intend.


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Discuss Tolkien's life and works in the Reading Room!
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Roverandom
Eerb


Dec 7 2019, 2:25pm


Views: 1481
The White Sheep of the Family

This is a wonderful chapter, demnation. Good observations and good questions!

What do I like about this chapter? In a word, Faramir!

Faramir, despite the author's claim of not seeing him coming, seems to be exactly the right person at the right time in the plot. He reminds Sam of Gandalf, but he reminds me of Sam (or perhaps Merry), just as noble but more approachable than the other "greats" of the story, like post-Strider Aragorn and even Frodo. He is most definitely a man of quality, all the more remarkable when considering the characters in his immediate family. The forum engaged in some "What if?" reveries a while back concerning Saruman, but just imagine if Boromir hadn't gotten his way (for once), and Denethor sent Faramir to Imladris instead. The Compleat Man dead in the attack at Parth Galen and Boromir in the cave of Henneth Annun with a host of men at his call. *shudder*

Other than Faramir himself, what I most like about this chapter is the beauty of the place: the falls at sunset and at moonset, the rocks and the forest, and the overall claustrophobic feeling, which is all the same comforting.

A last point about Faramir: I wonder if the scheduled timing of your discussion, the week after The Mirror of Galadriel, was another of those "chance meetings", as we say in Middle-Earth. Here we have yet another opportunity for someone of obvious power and a certain mastery to take the Ring, but one who, like Galadriel, passes the test. "But I am not such a man," he says, surely thinking of his brother in the same place. "Or I am wise enough to know that there are some perils from which a man must flee."

He must get it from his mother!Wink

For just as there has always been a Richard Webster, so too has there been a Black Scout of the North to greet him at the door on the threshold of the evening and to guard him through his darkest dreams.


CuriousG
Nevle-flah


Dec 7 2019, 3:57pm


Views: 1465
Excellent:


Quote
Faramir, despite the author's claim of not seeing him coming, seems to be exactly the right person at the right time in the plot.

I've always felt the same way about Faramir and was surprised Tolkien didn't see him coming all along. He sure fits into the story perfectly and plays several roles at once.


uncle Iorlas
Neirol


Dec 7 2019, 4:34pm


Views: 1462
I've often paused over this.


In Reply To
I wonder how much Faramir already guessed before Sam spilled the beans.

He even mentions to Frodo his knowledge of legends that Isildur took something from Saurons hand, and his guess that this was what lay between Frodo and Boromir. And later when Sam is careless, he knows immidiately what the enemys ring is, so he obviously had knowledge of it, but if he made the right guess before he kept it to himself.


It hardly seems like he could be this close without having pinned it down. What else would his guess be? But then he seems surprised when he finally does hear it outright.


Eruonen
Ronilav


Dec 7 2019, 4:36pm


Views: 1328
Tolkien really liked the character of Hawkeye in Last of the Mohicans

as well as other frontier characters. I see this in Aragorn and the rangers, Beren etc.

.https://www.mic.com/...th-based-on-kentucky

"Tolkien wrote that stories about "Red Indians" were his favourites as a boy. Shippey mentions Tolkien's interest in the primeval forests and people of North America, and speculates that the romantic descriptions of characters in James Fenimore Cooper might have influenced his descriptions of Aragorn and Éomer.[52]" Wiki

https://en.wikipedia.org/...lkien%27s_influences


(This post was edited by Eruonen on Dec 7 2019, 4:49pm)


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 7 2019, 7:48pm


Views: 1310
Subject

Sauron's Ring was not exactly common knowledge. As Gandalf said, what he told Frodo was for the most part known only to the Wise; and apparently nobody had ever read the Scroll of Isildur until Gandalf found it.

While Faramir was studious (as was his father), it's not likely that they knew any particulars, other than the rumor (3000 years old!) that Isildur had recovered some talisman of power from Sauron's body. And it's not likely Isildur told many people; according to The Disaster of the Gladden Fields, he only told his eldest son Elendur about it, and Elendur didn't survive.

Note also that nobody in Gondor, neither Denethor nor either son, had any clue what the "Isildur's Bane" of the dream was. While Boromir wasn't the bookish type, if Denethor had figured it out he certainly would have told him before sending him north! (In fact, the book heavily implies that Denethor had never heard of the Ring until Gandalf told him of Frodo's mission on the eve of the Siege; and Denethor's scolding of Faramir happened after that)

Faramir was shrewd, and he doubtless guessed near to the truth; but I don't think all the tumblers clicked into place for him until Sam's outburst.


(This post was edited by Solicitr on Dec 7 2019, 7:51pm)


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 8 2019, 10:45am


Views: 1225
Boromir's boat

I think Faramir's vision of Boromir shows Tolkien up to one of his favourite themes - forcing characters to make decisions based on limited information, but rewarding chracters who prefer the right choice to the clever one. Here, Frodo can fill in some puzzling details for Faramir (where Bormir's belt and boat came from). But neither character knows as much about the situation as we readers do.

As people have already said, I think Frodo's shocked reaction that the rest of the Felowship might be dead is quite a moment. Faramir can also tell a lot about Frodo, I expect, from Frodo's reaction. ("Will you not put aside your doubt of me and let me go? I am weary, and full of grief, and afraid. But I have a deed to do, or to attempt, before I too am slain. And the more need of haste, if we two halflings are all that remain of our fellowship.")

Faramir and Frodo here are reminiscent of Aragorn and Eomer in "Riders of Rohan" earlier in the book. Like Aragorn, Frodo has been captured by an armed patrol and has to persuade its leader not to carry out his standing orders to kill or arrest any travellers. The two meetings are of course different in many ways. But I think Frodo's willingness here to go on with his mission impresses Faramir. And I think it's similar to Aragorn's willingness to fight Eomer if Eomer insists on carrying out his orders. People are admired in Middle-earth if they push on indominitably with doing their duty, however hopeless it seems.

Perhaps 'Riders of Rohan' is someone's favourite chapter & they'd like to lead it....?

~~~~~~
"Go down to the shovel store and take your pick." Traditional prank played on dwarves when they start down the mine.


(This post was edited by noWizardme on Dec 8 2019, 10:55am)


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 8 2019, 4:00pm


Views: 1193
Great post!

 


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 8 2019, 4:17pm


Views: 1184
Thanks! *mods bowestly* //

 

~~~~~~
The Reading Room 'favourite chapters' project. http://newboards.theonering.net/...i?post=967482#967482 Each week, someone presents a favourite chapter from The Hobbit, LOTR or the Silmarillion. Just sign yourself up onto the schedule if you can lead a chapter.


noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 8 2019, 5:43pm


Views: 1187
misleading things, visions

Thinking about Boromir's boat, and how Tolkien bewilders his characters reminded me of a talk by Prof Tom Shippey. I was going to post it here, but when I looked it up again, it seemed to belong even more in last week's chapter, The Mirror of Galadriel. So I put it over there: http://newboards.theonering.net/...i?post=968154#968154

I wasn't expecting the same theme to turn up in two such different chapters! But the favourite chapters project is going to make us dodge about in Tolkien's works, rather than tackle them in any conventional order. And perhaps more unexpected links will occur to us because of it- wouldn't that be nice!

~~~~~~
The Reading Room 'favourite chapters' project. http://newboards.theonering.net/...i?post=967482#967482 Each week, someone presents a favourite chapter from The Hobbit, LOTR or the Silmarillion. Just sign yourself up onto the schedule if you can lead a chapter.


(This post was edited by noWizardme on Dec 8 2019, 5:45pm)


demnation
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 2:57am


Views: 1130
Yes!

I really do think that Faramir the pure, noble character works because he is so very different from his father and brother

"It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succour of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till. What weather they shall have is not ours to rule." Gandalf, "The Last Debate."


demnation
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 3:07am


Views: 1130
Interesting point!

Never really thought about how Faramir/Frodo echo Aragorn/Eomer from earlier in the book. The joys of discussing this stuff with others!

"It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succour of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till. What weather they shall have is not ours to rule." Gandalf, "The Last Debate."


demnation
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 3:14am


Views: 1128
you've opened my eyes

I never really saw that the ring was little more than a myth or rumor to the Gondorians and Isildur's bane was at best a guess. Perhaps I'm overly influenced by the movies, where its made very clear that Denethor knows about the ring from the very beginning

"It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succour of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till. What weather they shall have is not ours to rule." Gandalf, "The Last Debate."


demnation
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 3:17am


Views: 1126
Scary thought!

odd to think that things might have turned out worse for all involved if it was Faramir in the fellowship instead. And through no fault of his own! a fun what if for sure

"It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succour of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields that we know, so that those who live after may have clean earth to till. What weather they shall have is not ours to rule." Gandalf, "The Last Debate."


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 3:30am


Views: 1124
Except

Faramir wouldn't have tried to take the Ring from Frodo in the first place


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 3:31am


Views: 1125
In the movies

everybody knows way too much. The books are driven as much as anything by what people don't know.


sador
Nevle-flah


Dec 9 2019, 1:18pm


Views: 1105
We don't really know if Denethor knew about the Ring.

Gandalf states he thinks nobody but Saruman and him read Isildur's scroll for many years, and Boromir clearly did not know of the Ring.
However, Gandalf was wrong several times about Denethor, and the Steward does seem to know quite a bit about the Ring. Could he have kept the secret from his son ere he left for Imladris? Or, if (as Gandalf guessed), Denethor had pondered long about "Isildur's Bane" since Boromir left - is it far-fetched to suppose that he did the logical thing, searched for and read the very scroll Saruman and Gandalf did?


As was mentioned by Solicitr, in the movies the characters know quite a lot about things - this might be a means of keeping the relevant information in front of movie-firsters; or else the movie-makers felt that having characters rely mostly on faith and intuition won't "work" for the audience.
But it does change the story - and in my opinion, usually to its detriment. And whether the feeling regarding what would "work" is correct or not (I suspect successful movie-makers have a better guess than a secluded person like me) - I personally find the constant flaunting of the Ring cringeworthy. Compare, for instance, Faramir's statement he does not want to ever see the Ring, lest he falls lower in the test than Frodo.

Thinking about things I don't understand


sador
Nevle-flah


Dec 9 2019, 1:41pm


Views: 1106
Prof. Shippey compared the two chapters.

He argues that Eomer is out of his depth dealing with Aragorn, while Faramir is in firm control of the situation throughout this and the next chapter; in fact, he states that while the Denethor-Pippin relationship compaers unfavourably with the Théoden-Merry one, Faramir's intelligence and integrity belies his own words that in the Men of Gondor are losing their claim to being High Men.
I would go as far as quoting Boromir's words: "Believe not that in the land of Gondor the blood of Numenor is spent, nor all its pride and dignity forgotten" - although I doubt that he actually thought of his young brother when saying them. Perhaps he did.



In Reply To
Faramir and Frodo here are reminiscent of Aragorn and Eomer in "Riders of Rohan" earlier in the book. Like Aragorn, Frodo has been captured by an armed patrol and has to persuade its leader not to carry out his standing orders to kill or arrest any travellers. The two meetings are of course different in many ways. But I think Frodo's willingness here to go on with his mission impresses Faramir. And I think it's similar to Aragorn's willingness to fight Eomer if Eomer insists on carrying out his orders. People are admired in Middle-earth if they push on indominitably with doing their duty, however hopeless it seems.



Thinking about things I don't understand


Solicitr
NahoR

Dec 9 2019, 2:27pm


Views: 1102
Well,

In Eomer's defense, he isn't dealing with two frightened hobbits, but a veteran warrior-chieftain who claims to be a king and two combat-hardened princelings (one of whom isn't very tactful)


ElanorTX
SnevaH Yerg


Dec 11 2019, 1:04pm


Views: 1049
and Last of the Mohicans has a similar hiding place -

a sort of cave behind a waterfall. When Hawkeye and the Indians find that their gunpowder is soaked and useless, they jump into the torrent, leaving Duncan and the Munroe sisters behind on the ledge. Unfortunately Magwa and his party discover them there.

"I shall not wholly fail if anything can still grow fair in days to come."



noWizardme
Nevle-flah


Dec 11 2019, 1:26pm


Views: 1035
Nice catch! //

 

~~~~~~
The Reading Room 'favourite chapters' project. http://newboards.theonering.net/...i?post=967482#967482 Each week, someone presents a favourite chapter from The Hobbit, LOTR or the Silmarillion. Just sign yourself up onto the schedule if you can lead a chapter.


Eruonen
Ronilav


Dec 11 2019, 3:53pm


Views: 1038
Hawkeye and Aragorn are distant relatives.......

 


uncle Iorlas
Neirol


Dec 11 2019, 5:54pm


Views: 1030
somewhere between common knowledge and utterly secret?

Once the Ring is mentioned, Faramir does seem to know what that is. Is the lore of the Great Rings entirely lost in the Third Age, outside the White Council? Is Isildur's scroll (which supplies Gandalf with important new information, and which as an aside seems to have been found by Saruman as well) the only remembrance of it except by deathless elves and wizards? But Glóin makes clear that the memory of the Rings is alive and well among the Longbeards, and not just of their own; he's heard of the Three.

Plenty of tales of yore are kept alive; the Silmarils and the Palantíri are of greater antiquity than the Rings, and tales of them clearly abound among lettered people. Where is the implication that Denethor didn't know about the Ring? I never had that impression.


Solicitr
NahoR


Dec 11 2019, 6:01pm


Views: 1028
Well,


In Reply To
But Glóin makes clear that the memory of the Rings is alive and well among the Longbeards, and not just of their own; he's heard of the Three.


I'm not so sure that's the case; he only brings up the Three well after Elrond has told the whole history. And as Elrond replies, "Of the Three it is not permitted to speak."

The Longbeards (at least the royal house) had a tradition of their ring; but it's unclear how much if anything they knew even of the other Dwarf-rings.


uncle Iorlas
Neirol


Dec 11 2019, 7:51pm


Views: 1019
well this is remarkable

I hd never read things this way. I'm not sold; I believe he says "very mighty Rings, it is said," or something like that, not "very mighty Rings, you told us just now." But I guess I am a little short on hard evidence that the history of the Rings is not as secret as you make it. There's lots of conversation about it between the Wise and members of the Fellowship, and we the readers are right there, so it can begin to feel like old hat, maybe? But without actually cracking the text, I still find Faramir's apparent recognition, at least, leads me the other way—and although my memory isn't so fresh on conversations with Denethor, I am not too ready to conclude that he never knew of the Rings. But neither can I show that he did. Back to the books! Back to the books, Sam, like lightning!


Solicitr
NahoR


Dec 12 2019, 3:46pm


Views: 992
A subtle touch

Tolkien still was including vague allusions to his beloved Germanic legends; a case could be (in fact has been) made that he conceived his legendarium as being the foundation stock of the "cauldron of story" from which the tales of our world ultimately derived.

So Faramir here says, twice, "I would not take this thing, if it lay by the highway."

Now, Beowulf alludes, in the periphery as it were, to the matter of Freawaru and Ingeld, son of Froda or Froði (yes, same name as Mr Baggins). Froda was the legendary king of Denmark in whose golden age, it was said, a man could leave a golden ring by the highway and it would be untouched until he came to pick it up again.....


(This post was edited by Solicitr on Dec 12 2019, 3:47pm)


uncle Iorlas
Neirol


Dec 12 2019, 4:30pm


Views: 985
Fantastic.

I never caught the name Froda, let alone would I have known that delightfully obscure (but unmistakably intended) reference. But it is also definitely one more support for Théoden's remark that the language of the Rohirrim and of the hobbits seem marked by some distant relationship: a sort of anointing of hobbits (good plain Englishmen, unassuming but tough in the fibre) as heirs—like forgotten kings, perhaps—to the unshrinking valor of old Germanic legend, as I've generally been reading it.


Solicitr
NahoR


Dec 12 2019, 5:29pm


Views: 980
Yes


In Reply To
I never caught the name Froda, .


Tolkien even makes it explicit in Appendix F, where he tells us that actual masculine hobbit-names ended in -a, which he 'anglicized' (really Latinized) to -o. Thus Froda, Bilba, Otha.....