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The woods burst to life with tasty butterburs



NewsfromBree
spymaster@theonering.net

May 4, 8:02pm


Views: 1965
The woods burst to life with tasty butterburs

Until I read this article the other week over on The Mainichi I never realised that butterburs -- as in Barliman Butterbur -- were a type of flower.

Specifically, it's the name for some members of the Petasites genus of flowering plants in the sunflower family.

An excerpt:

We especially look forward to gathering our first butterburs, "fuki no to" in Japanese. The yellowish green buds push up through boggy or wet ground very soon after the snow goes. They contain a little ball of tiny yellow flowers, protected by a sheath of sepals. Flowers grow before the long stem, which is also edible, and the big green leaves. Here in Nagano the butterbur leaves (also called coltsfoot in English, because of their shape) are about as big as a dinner plate, but in Hokkaido they can be huge, big enough in summer to use as an umbrella.)


I'd known that Tolkien often named Hobbits after different species of flower (Primrose Brandybuck immediately comes to mind), but not that this extended to the Big People of Bree. One wonders -- perhaps Bill Ferny is also a nod to vegetation everywhere.

Read the rest of the article here.


hanne
Lorien

May 7, 3:34pm


Views: 1915
Thanks for this!

I completely missed that butterbur was a plant. It's so nice to see a picture.

Rereading, I find that the author of the Red Book pointed it out, but I missed that while laughing at Thistlewool (ouch) and Tunnelly, I guess. Here's the quote:


Quote
The Men of Bree seemed all to have rather botanical (and to the Shire-folk rather odd) names, like Rushlight, Goatleaf, Heathertoes, Appledore, Thistlewool and Ferny (not to mention Butterbur). Some of the hobbits had similar names. The Mugworts, for instance, seemed numerous. BUt most of them had natural names, such as Banks, Brockhouse, Longholes, Sandheaver, and Tunnelly, many of which were used in the Shire.

Couple more pictures from Wikipedia:

Rushlight


Goatleaf


Mugwort



Hamfast Gamgee
Grey Havens

May 7, 10:25pm


Views: 1897
I'm not sure what is going on with that Rushlight!

But, yes, Butterbur was mentioned as a plant. And a I think I have seen a leaf of one, anyway, a green leaf useful for binding things with as I remember.