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Scenes liked better in the movies then the books?



OldestDaughter
Rohan


Apr 23 2016, 5:31pm


Views: 1348
Scenes liked better in the movies then the books?

Hi everyone!
Just wanting to know, and I'm not sure if this has been posted before, but is there any scenes from the six films that you appreciated more than in the book series?
Smile




"Keen, heart-piercing was her song as the song of the lark that rises from the gates of night and pours its voice among the dying stars, seeing the sun behind the walls of the world; and the song of Lúthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where her feet had passed."


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Apr 23 2016, 8:44pm


Views: 1241
Gandalf arriving at Isengard,

purely because my imagination couldn't do it justice - PJ's design gave Isengard and its gardens (and later, the pits) the size and grandeur that they deserved.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Omnigeek
Lorien


Apr 23 2016, 9:17pm


Views: 1234
Bilbo's Birthday Party

I'm not sure if I appreciate it more but Bilbo's Birthday Party with Gandalf's fireworks is the only thing that comes to mind.


OldestDaughter
Rohan


Apr 23 2016, 9:51pm


Views: 1221
Agreed.

PJ certainly was on top of his designs and locations for the films. And the Isengard location was breathtaking on his part.Smile




"Keen, heart-piercing was her song as the song of the lark that rises from the gates of night and pours its voice among the dying stars, seeing the sun behind the walls of the world; and the song of Lúthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where her feet had passed."


Meneldor
Valinor


Apr 23 2016, 10:25pm


Views: 1221
Boromir's death.

The bare-bones description in the book frustrated me because it was just enough for me to realize there was a great heroic scene that was getting glossed over. PJ fleshed it out into one of the most powerful scenes in the film, IMO.


They that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters, these see the works of the Lord, and His wonders in the deep. -Psalm 107


OldestDaughter
Rohan


Apr 23 2016, 10:59pm


Views: 1214
Yes!

I have to agree full heartily. I also think that it was a good idea of PJ's and co. to include Merry and Pippin fighting by Boromir's side in his last moments. It made it much more meaningful and heart wrenching.




"Keen, heart-piercing was her song as the song of the lark that rises from the gates of night and pours its voice among the dying stars, seeing the sun behind the walls of the world; and the song of Lúthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where her feet had passed."


squire
Half-elven


Apr 24 2016, 1:04am


Views: 1221
For all of its flaws, Gandalf's and Pippin's arrival at Minas Tirith

is magnificent and brings to life a complex architecture that Tolkien's description probably doesn't get across as well to most readers.



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Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Apr 24 2016, 1:32am


Views: 1212
True.

Having the camera follow them through the seven levels opened up the walled city Gondor and helped viewers appreciate the achievement and complexity of its construction.

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded beggar with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Elizabeth
Half-elven


Apr 24 2016, 7:52am


Views: 1202
"I am glad to be with you, Samwise Gamgee...

...here at the end of all things." In this moment in the movie, Sam has just confessed that, had things been different, he would have married Rosie Cotton. This is the first moment, in either version, that Sam has revealed anything of his own inner life. I love it that movie Frodo acknowledged him, with love and comfort. The book version, 'I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam,’ still has the Master's needs at the center.

I totally agree with all the other things cited so far, too.








grammaboodawg
Immortal


Apr 24 2016, 11:46am


Views: 1200
Oh geez... there are bunches!

To start:

More moments than I can think of with Gandalf. He becomes so real and unforgettable in these films.

Merry and Pippin's introduction with the fireworks.

Bilbo's speech at the Party.

The Fellowship's trek through Moria, especially when Gandalf and Frodo speak together (So do all who see such times) and their plight on the Stairs of Khazad-dum! Brilliant!

Gandalf facing-down the Balrog and the Fellowship's escape from Moria.

Gandalf's fight and fall with the Balrog.

Anything with Boromir. That character was elevated to someone I really care about. Especially when Aragorn and Boromir speak in Lothlorien and later at Boromir's death.

Wormtongue, Gandalf and Theoden and the whole arrival of the Hunters and Gandalf at Meduseld

Gandalf and Pippin waiting for death in Minas Tirith.

Sam and Frodo on the rocks above the lava flow after the Ring is destroyed.

Eowyn fighting the Lord of the Nazgul and "saving" Theoden.

The charge of the Riders onto the Field of the Pelennor Fields.

The Grey Havens


The Dwarves each having a voice, personality, and contribution to the Quest.

The Dwarves arriving at Bag End and their feasting, singing, planning.

The battle of the Stone Giants! Awesome! :D

Bilbo and Gollum's Riddle game.

The flight and escape from Goblin-town

The Company in the trees and saved by the eagles.

Bilbo saving the Dwarves from the Spiders.

The Company's escape from the Elves and their barrel ride.

Bilbo and Smaug

Any time Bilbo's speaking with Balin.


The Dwarves' entrance into the Mountain and facing down Smaug (never happened in the book... and I'm so glad it did here :)

Gandalf and Thorin's sword-finding.

Bilbo and the Trolls

Many more... but I have to go!

GREAT QUESTION!!! :D



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dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Apr 24 2016, 1:11pm


Views: 1196
That was one of the things that pleased me the most about The Hobbit movies.

The Dwarves were not cowering on the doorstep - they were actively engaged! They were "Hero Dwarves", not the doofuses in the book.

Granted, I did not like their walking away after giving up at the Door - it reminded me too much of one of my least favorite moments in RotK, the "go home, Sam" - but then neither did Richard Armitage, who has said that Thorin did not start down the stairs, he stood in the shadows of the rocks there.

But the action inside Erebor more than made up for that.

Even Thorin on the wheelbarrow-ride: the first time I saw that, I got so excited, PJ had (intentionally or unintentionally) paid homage to the original version of The Hobbit, where Bilbo stabs Smaug, then escapes the mountain by jumping into a large cup and floating down a river made by Smaug's blood.

I may be the only person who voted DoS as their favorite movie of the six...

Angelic


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


Hamfast Gamgee
Grey Havens

Apr 24 2016, 6:23pm


Views: 1166
You liked DOS best?

I think you might well be the only person that thinks that here! Smile


OldestDaughter
Rohan


Apr 24 2016, 6:48pm


Views: 1150
Those are great!!!

I would have to say you covered some of the best scenes in the films.
Two of my favorite scenes in the films is The Last March of the Ents and the Dwarven War Chariot!Smile




"Keen, heart-piercing was her song as the song of the lark that rises from the gates of night and pours its voice among the dying stars, seeing the sun behind the walls of the world; and the song of Lúthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where her feet had passed."


OldestDaughter
Rohan


Apr 24 2016, 6:52pm


Views: 1153
I never knew that about the original version of the Hobbit!

That is very interesting. I had never heard of that before about Bilbo killing Smaug. Hhhmmm. I will now watch that scene in a new light!Smile


Very interesting!!




"Keen, heart-piercing was her song as the song of the lark that rises from the gates of night and pours its voice among the dying stars, seeing the sun behind the walls of the world; and the song of Lúthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where her feet had passed."


Silverlode
Forum Admin / Moderator


Apr 24 2016, 9:19pm


Views: 1134
Not the only one.

I liked DOS best too.

Silverlode

Roads go ever ever on
Under cloud and under star
Yet feet that wandering have gone
Turn at last to home afar.
Eyes that fire and sword have seen
And horror in the halls of stone
Look at last on meadows green
And trees and hills they long have known.




dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Apr 24 2016, 10:00pm


Views: 1124
I highly recommend John Rateliff's History of The Hobbit.

Fascinating and eye-opening material on how the story came to be written!

(I still get a geeky thrill, thinking of a few years back when a Maps exhibit was at the Field Museum in Chicago, and entmaiden and Annael and I saw the actual page of the "Pryftan Fragment" on which Tolkien drew the Mountain. Now, I hope I've intrigued you...!)


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


OldestDaughter
Rohan


Apr 24 2016, 10:51pm


Views: 1118
Indeed you have!

Smile I will have to look into that book!! It sounds awesome!Laugh




"Keen, heart-piercing was her song as the song of the lark that rises from the gates of night and pours its voice among the dying stars, seeing the sun behind the walls of the world; and the song of Lúthien released the bonds of winter, and the frozen waters spoke, and flowers sprang from the cold earth where her feet had passed."


squire
Half-elven


Apr 25 2016, 12:31am


Views: 1124
*cough* orginal version *cough* not the same as unpublished draft *cough, cough*

Your cheerful josh could possibly confuse people who, perhaps, have long heard that in the "original version of The Hobbit" Gollum voluntarily escorts Bilbo out of the caves with no knowledge that Bilbo had filched his Ring. Because, in that actual "original version" - the one that was published in 1937 and not revised until the 1950s - there's nothing like the briefly contemplated scene of Bilbo killing Smaug and riding a river of blood that you enjoyed reading in The History of The Hobbit, the HoME-like account of various drafts and outlines that Tolkien decided not to publish!

As he worked on how to finish his story, Tolkien did briefly consider what lesser authors might have thought would be a logical and satisfying climax. He quickly and very sensibly realized that to have Bilbo the timid Hobbit burglar heroically kill Smaug would destroy the soul of the book and make it a work of nonsensical whimsy.



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Smaug the iron
Gondor


Apr 25 2016, 5:01am


Views: 1096
The battle of five armies

I did like the battle of five armies and the death of Thorin, Fili and Kili better in the film then in the book, in the book the battle was to short and it was not interesting enough, and when it started to get interesting with the Company running out of the mountain and the Eagles and Beorn's arrival, Bilbo gets knocked down and the chapter ends ( talk about anticlimactic) and when he wakes up again the battle is over and the best part of the battle ( the eagles, Beorn, the death of Fili and Kili) is over and we did not see it.
In the film we do see the death scenes and the Eagles and Beorn ( but not much) plus the entire battle was awesome Heart.


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Apr 25 2016, 11:52am


Views: 1075
DoS is my fav of the 3, too!

All of that action with Smaug and the Mountain AND the barrel ride AND Bilbo's realization of what the Ring was doing to him after killing the crabby-creature AND so much more... but Smaug's portions still gives me chills!



sample

We have been there and back again.


TIME Google Calendar


6th draft of TH:AUJ Geeky Observations List - November 28, 2013
4th draft of TH:DOS Geeky Observations List - May 15, 2014

5th draft of TH:BotFA Geeky Observations List - January 30, 2015


TORn's Geeky Observations Lists for LotR and The Hobbit


Loresilme
Valinor


Apr 25 2016, 3:23pm


Views: 1067
"I can't carry it for you ... but I can carry you!"

Using only the first portion of the lines from the book (below) made it more impactful onscreen.

Overall the way they imagined and portrayed this entire scene - the music, the acting, the way the line was spoken by Sean Astin, the special effects, etc. - was powerful and unforgettable.



'"Come, Mr. Frodo!' he cried. 'I can't carry it for you, but I can carry you and it as well. So up you get! Come on, Mr. Frodo dear! Sam will give you a ride. Just tell him where to go, and he'll go.'



Nuradar
Rohan


Apr 25 2016, 4:06pm


Views: 1063
Well said Elizabeth

I hadn't picked up on that difference, and it truly is significant. Beautiful change and beautiful moment.


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Apr 25 2016, 4:55pm


Views: 1060
You are quite right, of course - the Unpublished originals!

I should have made a point of that; I keep forgetting that many here may not be aware of the existence HoME or HoH.

And few have had the opportunity to read The Hobbit as it was originally published!

You "grew up" with the 1937 Hobbit - how did you feel, when you first found out that Tolkien had changed the "Riddles in the Dark" chapter to present a darker Gollum?


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"I desired dragons with a profound desire"


squire
Half-elven


Apr 25 2016, 5:35pm


Views: 1064
Basically, "Wait, that's not right. Is it?"

I was reading the Michael Hague illustrated edition of The Hobbit to my young daughters in the 1990s, not having read the book myself for a decade or two. The chapter's end was weird, with Gollum shrieking and cursing rather than padding up the tunnel, bidding Bilbo farewell, and disappearing back down into the darkness while the hobbit contemplated what to do next. I went and dug out my childhood edition, and sure enough, the text was quite different. Suddenly the opaque reference in the LotR Prologue to Bilbo having changed his tale came to me. Ah, so that was what was going on!

I've never completely adjusted - part of me still cherishes a wretched but honest Gollum who calls himself, not the Ring, "my precious", and a harmless Ring of Invisibility, with the changes simply glossed over during Frodo and Gandalf's talk in chapter 2 of LotR.



squire online:
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Dr. Squire introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


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N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Apr 25 2016, 7:25pm


Views: 1055
The LOTR Prologue long confused me, too.

As did the references in "The Shadow of the Past" and "The Council of Elrond" to two different versions of Bilbo's encounter with Gollum, but for the opposite reason of yours: I only knew the revised Hobbit. I can't remember when I figured out what was going on, but it was possibly upon encountering Douglas Anderson's The Annotated Hobbit or Bonniejean Christensen's article "Gollum's Character Transformation in The Hobbit" (in Jared Lobdell's A Tolkien Compass) at the library, some fifteen or more years after first reading The Lord of the Rings.

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dreamflower
Lorien

Apr 26 2016, 10:35pm


Views: 194
Yes, definitely

Boromir's death affects me still the same way it did 15 years ago.

I can't think of any other actual book scenes that I liked better, though I can think of a few I liked as well, such as Gandalf facing off with the Balrog, or the first sight of the Argonath.

And there are a very few gapfiller scenes (that were not in the book, but could have been) that I really liked, such as Boromir's conversation with Frodo in the EE, Pippin receiving his livery and his conversation with Faramir in the EE.

Some people call it fanfiction. I call it story-internal literary criticism.


Boromir Stark
Rivendell

Apr 29 2016, 11:40am


Views: 168
Boromir's death.

As someone said earlier, it was pretty much glossed over in the book.

Also, I loved the battle in Balin's Tomb in the movie. So awesome!


the 13th warrior
Rivendell


May 8 2016, 5:17pm


Views: 118
Three that come to mind: Shelob, Galadriel's Gifts, Flight to the Ford

Hello Oldest Daughter, been a long time since I visited here. Hope all's well.

The movie battle between Sam and Shelob was more intense than the book passages. The movie emphasized the horror of a spider the size of a small truck, jaws snapping away, stinger ready with venom, the terrifying size and mobility of Shelob, with Sam's courage and his own agility under pressure. The book passages were constructed with Tolkien playing out the suspense of hobbits realizing they're watched by something in the darkness, then the hope of escape, and then the spider's attack when Sam and Frodo were separated. Tolkien also made Shelob sound like an otherworldly monster, a dragon's armor plating on a huge spider's body, evil intelligence. The movie emphasized the simple desperate struggle between a hobbit and super-arachnid.

The movie scene was pure adrenalin rush of Sam having to use his wits, can't make one mistake or it's over and he's eaten. Sean Astin really gave it his all, never gave up. In the book Shelob tries to crush Sam under her and stabs herself on his sword, ironic that she mortally wounds herself. And Sam's fighting spirit powers Galadriel's phial into a white hot light that blasts her damaged eye. I have found myself liking the more direct one on one movie battle.

I liked the movie's take on Galadriel's farewelll gifts as opposed to the books. She was direct and personal with each Fellowship member, singling out a few for special consideration--that Pippin would find his courage, Frodo got his phial, Gimli, very powerful acting, gets the memory of her and her hair strands. We saw her expressions and theirs, shared in their moment together. Her separate farewell to Aragorn is powerful because she warns him of the penalty for failing, but gives hope by calling him his kingly name, Ellesar, as she bids farewell forever, never to see him again. Really amazing stuff, hits home the Aragorn and elves relationship.

Finally, I never had a problem with Liv Tyler joining the story one bit and her flight to the Ford was much more suspenseful than the books because she was alone with a sick hobbit and the Nine Riders after her in full force. The book dilutes this race and climax as Frodo is on Asfaloth, helpless and overcome with fear, while the Aragorn, Glorfindel and the hobbits drive the Riders into the river with torches and Glorfinder's power. Arwen commanding the waters with seconds to spare as the Riders were well across the river was much more exciting.

Just a few thoughts,
The 13th Warrior
The Left Field Caliphate
"From the scroll rooms of Gondor....."