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Whats your favorite?



Henoluin Elsilim
Rivendell


Oct 19 2008, 7:48pm


Views: 1108
Whats your favorite?

Hi all!
I was really bored so I decided to find out what everyones favorite Tolkien song/poems are. They can be from anything the Professor wrote.

I don't actually have a single favorite, but I always enjoy this one.

The Man in the Moon Stayed Up To Late

There is an inn, a merry old inn
beneath an old grey hill,
And there they brew a beer so brown
That the Man in the Moon himself came down
one night to drink his fill.

The ostler has a tipsy cat
that plays a five-stringed fiddle;
And up and down he saws his bow
Now squeaking high, now purring low,
now sawing in the middle.

The landlord keeps a little dog
that is mighty fond of jokes;
When there's good cheer among the guests,
He cocks an ear at all the jests
and laughs until he chokes.

They also keep a hornéd cow
as proud as any queen;
But music turns her head like ale,
And makes her wave her tufted tail
and dance upon the green.

And O! the rows of silver dishes
and the store of silver spoons!
For Sunday there's a special pair,
And these they polish up with care
on Saturday afternoons.

The Man in the Moon was drinking deep,
and the cat began to wail;
A dish and a spoon on the table danced,
The cow in the garden madly pranced
and the little dog chased his tail.

The Man in the Moon took another mug,
and then rolled beneath his chair;
And there he dozed and dreamed of ale,
Till in the sky the stars were pale,
and dawn was in the air.

Then the ostler said to his tipsy cat:
'The white horses of the Moon,
They neigh and champ their silver bits;
But their master's been and drowned his wits,
and the Sun'll be rising soon!'

So the cat on the fiddle played hey-diddle-diddle,
a jig that would wake the dead:
He squeaked and sawed and quickened the tune,
While the landlord shook the Man in the Moon:
'It's after three!' he said.

They rolled the Man slowly up the hill
and bundled him into the Moon,
While his horses galloped up in rear,
And the cow came capering like a deer,
and a dish ran up with the spoon.

Now quicker the fiddle went deedle-dum-diddle;
the dog began to roar,
The cow and the horses stood on their heads;
The guests all bounded from their beds
and danced upon the floor.

With a ping and a pang the fiddle-strings broke!
the cow jumped over the Moon,
And the little dog laughed to see such fun,
And the Saturday dish went off at a run
with the silver Sunday spoon.

The round Moon rolled behind the hill,
as the Sun raised up her head.
She* hardly believed her fiery eyes;
For though it was day, to her surprise
they all went back to bed!



This is of course, the song that Frodo sings in the Prancing Pony when he falls off the table and the Ring "accidently" slips onto his finger.
It always makes me smile. Smile



(I hope this is appropriate for this forum. I wasn't sure whether it should go here in Main or in the Reading Room)

~ Henoluin ~




(This post was edited by Henoluin Elsilim on Oct 19 2008, 7:51pm)


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 19 2008, 10:14pm


Views: 891
Ooh, a favorite Tolkien poem thread!

Haven't had one of these in a while - thanks for starting it! Smile

One of my favorites is a "scribble, on the page [of the Red Book] recording Bilbo's When winter first begins to bite", a little philological gem:

The wind so whirled a weathercock
He could not hold his tail up.
The frost so nipped a throstlecock
He could not snap a snail up.
'My case is hard' the throstle cried,
And 'All is vane' the cock replied;
And so they set their wail up.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I desired dragons with a profound desire"

"It struck me last night that you might write a fearfully good romantic drama, with as much of the 'supernatural' as you cared to introduce. Have you ever thought of it?"
-Geoffrey B. Smith, letter to JRR Tolkien, 1915


Ataahua
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 19 2008, 10:44pm


Views: 892
"There once was a Nazgul named Angmar..."

Cool

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


debo
Rohan

Oct 19 2008, 11:29pm


Views: 871
I like the Lament for Theoden and the dead riders of Rohan in book 3

it is in Middle English alliterative rhyme- love it!!
Makes it seem so real.

Hey a Middle Earth limerick competition- see aboveWinkWinkWink

Frodo; "What I chiefly need now is courage . . ."


silneldor
Half-elven


Oct 19 2008, 11:42pm


Views: 877
Sam stands up, clears his throat and puts his arms behind his back.

Oliphaunt


Gray as a mouse,
Big as a house,
Nose like a snake,
I make the earth shake,
As I tramp through the grass;
Trees crack as i pass,
With horns in my mouth
I walk in the South,
Flapping big ears.
Beyond count of years
I stump round and round,
Never lie on the ground,
Not even to die.
Oliphaunt am I,
Biggest of all,
Huge, old, and tall.
If ever you'd meet me,
You wouldn't forget me.
If you never do,
You won't think I'm true;
But old Oliphaunt am I,
And I never lie.

I like this one because Sam does and i can see him having fun with this telling his children.

"Tolkien, like Lewis, believed that, through story, the real world would become a more magical place, full of meaning. We see its patterns and colors in a fresh way. The recovery of a true view of the world applies both to individual things, like hills and stones, and to the cosmic - the depths of space and time itself. For in sub-creation, in Tolkien's view, there is a "survey" of space and time. Reality is captured on a miniature scale. Through stories like The Lord of the Rings, a renewed view of things is given, illuminating the homely, the spiritial, the physical, and the moral dimensions of the world."

Tolkien and C.S. Lewis- The Gift of Friendship -Duriez

After Sunset
I have an understanding with the hills
At evening, when slanted radiance fills
Their hollows, and the great winds let them be,
And they are quiet and look down at me.
Oh, then I see the patience in their eyes
Out of the centuries that made them wise.
They lend me hoarded memory, and I learn
Their thoughts of granite and their whims of fern,
And why a dream of forests must endure
Though every tree be slain; and how the pure,
Invisible beauty has a word so brief
A flower can say it, or a shaken leaf,
But few may ever snare it in a song,
Though for the quest a life is not too long.
When the blue hills grow tender, when they pull
The twilight close with gesture beautiful,
And shadows are their garments, and the air
Deepens, and the wild veery is at prayer,
Their arms are strong around me; and I know
That somehow I shall follow where you go
To the still land beyond the evening star,
Where everlasting hills and valleys are,
And silence may not hurt us any more,
And terror shall be past, and grief and war.

Grace Hazard Conkling (conclusion of a song recital from the book Lake Minnewaska by W Doughty where he says ''this is not the end of songs which we are certain will continue to rise from gifted minds and hearts in this enchanted realm where sometimes 'great mists lie' but always where 'great dreams rise' ''.) ...Reminds me particularly of the elves and the ents


May the grace of Manwë let us soar with eagle's wings!

In the air, among the clouds in the sky
Here is where the birds of Manwe fly
Looking at the land, and the water that flows
The true beauty of earth shows
With the stars of Varda lighting my way
In all the realms this is where I stay
In the realm of Manwë Súlimo
By El~Cugu

From the website: 'The Realm of Manwe'








Darkstone
Immortal


Oct 19 2008, 11:54pm


Views: 901
No contest

I sit beside the fire and think
Of all that I have seen.
Of meadow-flowers and butterflies
In summers that have been.

Of yellow leaves and gossamer
In autumns that there were
With morning mist and silver sun
And wind upon my hair.

I sit beside the fire and think
Of how the world will be
When winter comes without a spring
That I shall ever see.

For still there are so many things
That I have never seen
In every wood in every spring
There is a different green.

I sit beside the fire and think
Of people long ago,
And people who will see a world
That I shall never know.

But all the while I sit and think
Of times there were before
I listen for returning feet
And voices at the door.

******************************************
The audacious proposal stirred his heart. And the stirring became a song, and it mingled with the songs of Gil-galad and Celebrian, and with those of Feanor and Fingon. The song-weaving created a larger song, and then another, until suddenly it was as if a long forgotten memory woke and for one breathtaking moment the Music of the Ainur revealed itself in all glory. He opened his lips to sing and share this song. Then he realized that the others would not understand. Not even Mithrandir given his current state of mind. So he smiled and simply said "A diversion.”



Finding Frodo
Tol Eressea


Oct 20 2008, 12:14am


Views: 889
Sing Hey! for the bath at the close of the day

I won't type out the whole thing. I like "The Man in the Moon" too, but the bath song is the one that gets stuck in my head. I do prefer the light and comic verse over most of the more serious poetry.

Where's Frodo?


weaver
Half-elven

Oct 20 2008, 1:06am


Views: 869
Sam's song in Cirth Ungol

I love not only the sentiment, but the the idea of him being able to reconnect with Frodo through a song like that.

Nice thread, and if I haven't said it before, welcome as I think you are fairly new!

Weaver



weaver
Half-elven

Oct 20 2008, 1:08am


Views: 872
I'd still like to see a poetry discussion in the Reading Room...

I remember you lobbying for this awhile back, Darkstone. If you want to try again when the topic of the next discussion comes up over there, I will be glad to cast my vote for that as well.

Weaver



simplyaven
Grey Havens


Oct 20 2008, 1:36am


Views: 868
I second that!

it brings tears to my eyes, it's so... nostalgic and true Evil

Culinary journey through Middle Earth starting October 15 on the Main board

I believe


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 20 2008, 2:17am


Views: 859
Who arrogantly fought at Pelenn-ar...

Good grief, do you know how hard it is to find a rhyme for "Angmar"? Laugh


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I desired dragons with a profound desire"

"It struck me last night that you might write a fearfully good romantic drama, with as much of the 'supernatural' as you cared to introduce. Have you ever thought of it?"
-Geoffrey B. Smith, letter to JRR Tolkien, 1915


silneldor
Half-elven


Oct 20 2008, 2:50am


Views: 860
This IS the finest.

 With all the sublime visuals that it invokes, it does hit home like nothing else does.

"Tolkien, like Lewis, believed that, through story, the real world would become a more magical place, full of meaning. We see its patterns and colors in a fresh way. The recovery of a true view of the world applies both to individual things, like hills and stones, and to the cosmic - the depths of space and time itself. For in sub-creation, in Tolkien's view, there is a "survey" of space and time. Reality is captured on a miniature scale. Through stories like The Lord of the Rings, a renewed view of things is given, illuminating the homely, the spiritial, the physical, and the moral dimensions of the world."

Tolkien and C.S. Lewis- The Gift of Friendship -Duriez

After Sunset
I have an understanding with the hills
At evening, when slanted radiance fills
Their hollows, and the great winds let them be,
And they are quiet and look down at me.
Oh, then I see the patience in their eyes
Out of the centuries that made them wise.
They lend me hoarded memory, and I learn
Their thoughts of granite and their whims of fern,
And why a dream of forests must endure
Though every tree be slain; and how the pure,
Invisible beauty has a word so brief
A flower can say it, or a shaken leaf,
But few may ever snare it in a song,
Though for the quest a life is not too long.
When the blue hills grow tender, when they pull
The twilight close with gesture beautiful,
And shadows are their garments, and the air
Deepens, and the wild veery is at prayer,
Their arms are strong around me; and I know
That somehow I shall follow where you go
To the still land beyond the evening star,
Where everlasting hills and valleys are,
And silence may not hurt us any more,
And terror shall be past, and grief and war.

Grace Hazard Conkling (conclusion of a song recital from the book Lake Minnewaska by W Doughty where he says ''this is not the end of songs which we are certain will continue to rise from gifted minds and hearts in this enchanted realm where sometimes 'great mists lie' but always where 'great dreams rise' ''.) ...Reminds me particularly of the elves and the ents


May the grace of Manwë let us soar with eagle's wings!

In the air, among the clouds in the sky
Here is where the birds of Manwe fly
Looking at the land, and the water that flows
The true beauty of earth shows
With the stars of Varda lighting my way
In all the realms this is where I stay
In the realm of Manwë Súlimo
By El~Cugu

From the website: 'The Realm of Manwe'








N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 20 2008, 2:50am


Views: 862
Tolkien wrote another "Oliphaunt" poem.

"Iumbo, or ye Kinde of ye Oliphaunt", a much longer poem (83 lines) that was published in 1927 (along with an earlier version of "Fastitocalon", whose later rendition is known to most Tolkien fans from the 1962 "Tom Bombadil" poetry collection). Unlike the poems others have posted, which possibly pass fair-use muster, being but short passages from LotR, a much longer work, I don't think Tolkien's stand-alone poems can be copied here in full (NZ Strider did it on the old forums, but those weren't accessed by search engines); here's a short excerpt:


Quote
His pendulous ears they flap about like flannel;
He trails a supple elongated nose
That twixt his tusks of pearly-white enamel
Performs the functions of a rubber hose
Or vacuum cleaner as his needs impose



This oliphaunt has a drug problem, which gets him killed by hunters.

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N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 20 2008, 3:04am


Views: 867
Do you know "This Is Just to Say" by William Carlos Williams?

Only slightly off-topic.

First, read "This is Just to Say", Williams' little poem from 1934.

Now read this, apparently one in a series of parodies of that poem.

Thanks to David Bratman for linking to the parody from the Mythopoeic Society e-mail list. As Bratman notes, there are some Tolkien-mistakes in the parody, but I think it's still worth a chuckle.

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Join us Oct. 13-19 for "The Pyre of Denethor".

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Mar
Gondor


Oct 20 2008, 3:17am


Views: 847
Just one favorite, eh? The entire Lay of Leithian

Lúthien and Beren. My fave. Very long but that makes it even better.

Most people don't know there are angels whose only job is to make sure you don't get too comfortable - fall asleep and miss your life.


Mar
Gondor


Oct 20 2008, 3:22am


Views: 857
I love to sing that - and quite agree it is the best time of day.

Although sometimes I have to change it to 'at the start of day'. Depending.
But we love hot water!

Most people don't know there are angels whose only job is to make sure you don't get too comfortable - fall asleep and miss your life.


Mar
Gondor


Oct 20 2008, 3:24am


Views: 843
*Passing around tissues* Yes. So beautiful. //

 

Most people don't know there are angels whose only job is to make sure you don't get too comfortable - fall asleep and miss your life.


squire
Half-elven


Oct 20 2008, 4:07am


Views: 873
What's the parody part?

The fruit was so plentiful that young hobbits very nearly bathed in strawberries and cream; and later they sat on the lawns under the plum-trees and ate, until they had made piles of stones like small pyramids or the heaped skulls of a conqueror, and then they moved on. (LotR, VI, 9, "The Grey Havens")



*hums* "Boggie, boggie, boggie, boggie..."



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Footeramas: The 3rd TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion; and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 20 2008, 5:09am


Views: 852
I'm not sure I follow your question.

Are you saying that Tolkien beat Abi Sutherland to a Middle-earth parody of Williams' poem by fifty years? That Sutherland is somewhat like Beard and Kenney in only slightly heightening a grotesqueness already present in the story? Or just that Sutherland's poem isn't funny enough? Anyway, nice catch on the plum-trees! I remember the "heaped skulls" scene from "The Grey Havens" particularly because you emphasized it during the 2006 discussion of that chapter, but not that detail.

Note that the comments responding to that blog post include further parodies of Wililams, including some in the style of Arthur Conan Doyle, Oscar Wilde, and Wallace Stevens.

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We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Oct. 13-19 for "The Pyre of Denethor".

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Ainu Laire
Tol Eressea


Oct 20 2008, 9:27am


Views: 851
There are two, for two very separate reasons.

The first one is the "I like it because it belongs to my favorite character and my favorite character is better than anyone else". This is deferring to the wild 'fan girl' part of my fan self and is, of course, Strider's Poem as composed by Bilbo Baggins:

All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;

The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
A light from the shadows shall spring;
Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
The crownless again shall be king.

The second is the "I like it because I'm a language nerd, it's Elvish, and it talks about things that you need to be a nerd to understand". This is deferring to the wise, slightly obsessive "Tolkien nerd" part of my fan self and would be Galadriel's song that she sings in Farewell to Lorien:

Ai! laurie lantar lassi surinen,
yeni unotime ve ramar aldaron!
Yeni ve linte yuldar avanier
mi oromardi lisse-miruvoreva
Andune pella, Vardo tellumar
nu luini yassen tintillar i eleni
omaryo airetari-lirinen.


Si man i yulma nin enquantuva?

An si Tintalle Varda Oiolosseo
ve fanyar maryat Elentari ortane,
ar ilye tier undulave lumbule;
ar sindanoriello caita mornie
i falmalinnar imbe met ar hisie
untupa Calaciryo miri oiale.
Si vanwa na, Romello vanwa, Valimar!


Namarie! Nai hiruvalye Valimar.
Nai elye hiruva. Namarie!


I have taken to memorizing the poem. I haven't gotten very far yet, but it's coming along. I do have Elbereth Gilthoniel down, so this shouldn't be too bad... hopefully.

(And yes, some of the above comments were very much tongue-in-cheek. I blame the time of the night).

My LJ
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NARF since age 8, when I refused to read the Hobbit because the cover looked boring and icky.


a.s.
Valinor


Oct 20 2008, 10:18am


Views: 843
and the Middle English one

OK, I loved that, both the initial post and the comments.

Buried in the comments is a link that says something like "already done", which takes one to a 2005 post where William's poem is translated into Middle English. I love that I can still read the last verse without help:

Forgief me
hie wćron smćcclice
swa swete
and swa cealde


All right, I admit I can't really read "smaecclice" as "delicious" without help. But I got the rest. Pretty swete, really.

Cool

a.s.

"an seileachan"

Pooh began to feel a little more comfortable, because when you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.

"You only see the outside of me"


a.s.
Valinor


Oct 20 2008, 10:45am


Views: 845
anything NOT recited by Tom Bombadil!

Cool

I actually like the "Where now the horse and the rider" very much as poetry, especially the somewhat cryptic last two lines:

Who shall gather the smoke of the dead wood burning,
Or behold the flowing years from the Sea returning?


But the poem I like the best is the one that can be chanted along with Gimli. I love the pictures that come to my mind when I read it. I love to read it out loud, actually. I'm not sure how it measures up as "poetry"; however, as chanted verse it's wonderful. I fell in love with the lines "In Moria, in Khazad-dűm" when I first read LOTR, and this is one of the few poems in the text that I actually read all the way through, when I get to them.

"No words were laid on stream or stone" is a line I didn't really notice until after reading many times. I often wonder what that means. Any ideas? Is it related to the Dwarves secret language?


The world world was young, the mountains green,
No stain yet on the Moon was seen,
No words were laid on stream or stone,
When Durin woke and walked alone.
He named the nameless hills and dells;
He drank from yet untasted wells;
He stooped and looked in Mirrormere,
And saw a crown of stars appear,
As gems upon a silver thread,
Above the shadow of his head.



a.s.

"an seileachan"

Pooh began to feel a little more comfortable, because when you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.

"You only see the outside of me"


a.s.
Valinor


Oct 20 2008, 10:45am


Views: 836
ditto //

 

"an seileachan"

Pooh began to feel a little more comfortable, because when you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.

"You only see the outside of me"


acheron
Gondor


Oct 20 2008, 2:07pm


Views: 843
the road goes ever on and on...

I'd thought this might be an obvious choice, but no one's said it yet, so maybe not! My favorite is:

The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say.

Though "I sit beside the fire and think..." that Darkstone already posted is a (very) close second.

For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much -- the wheel, New York, wars, and so on -- while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man, for precisely the same reasons. -- Douglas Adams


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Oct 20 2008, 3:08pm


Views: 845
Himself is probably rolling over in his grave, but

I really like "Goblin Feet", which he wrote as a very young man and didn't like at all in his later life:

I am off down the road
Where the fairy lanterns glowed
And the little pretty flitter-mice are flying
A slender band of gray
It runs creepily away
And the hedges and the grasses are a-sighing
The air is full of wings,
And of blundery beetle-things
That warn you with their whirring and their humming.

O! I hear the tiny horns
Of enchanged leprechauns
And the padded feet of many gnomes a-coming!
O! the lights! o! the gleams! O! the little twinkly sounds!
O! the rustle of their noiseless little robes!
O! the echo of their feet - of their happy little feet!
O! the swinging lamps in the starlit globes.

I must follow in their train
Down the crooked fairy lane
Where the coney-rabbits long ago have gone.
And where silvery they sing
In a moving moonlit ring
All a twinkle with the jewels they have on.

They are fading round the turn
Where the glow worms palely burn
And the echo of their padding feet is dying!
O! it's knocking at my heart-
Let me go! Let me start!
For the little magic hours are all a-flying.

O! the warmth! O! the hum! O! the colors in the dark!
O! the gauzy wings of golden honey-flies!
O! the music of their feet - of their dancing goblin feet!
O! the magic! O! the sorrow when it dies.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Ciars
Rohan


Oct 20 2008, 4:09pm


Views: 840
Journey's End

I've always liked this poem, it resonates a message of hope in the midst of an ending, kinda reminds us that although life may end the spirit lives on.


Journey's End
In western lands beneath the Sun
The flowers may rise in Spring,
The trees may bud, the waters run,
The merry finches sing.
Or there maybe 'tis cloudless night,
And swaying branches bear
The Elven-stars as jewels white
Amid their branching hair.

Though here at journey's end I lie
In darkness buried deep,
Beyond all towers strong and high,
Beyond all mountains steep,
Above all shadows rides the Sun
And Stars for ever dwell:
I will not say the Day is done,
Nor bid the Stars farewell.



the perfect place to unwind


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Oct 20 2008, 4:32pm


Views: 836
Hands down on mine

Variations of the One... but it's so perfect:

First, Bilbo's variation:



Quote

'Take care! I don't care. Don't you worry about me! I am as happy now as I have ever been, and that is saying a great deal. But the time has come. I am being swept off my feet at last,' he added, and then in a low voice, as if to himself, he sang softly in the dark:

The Road goes ever on and on

Down from the door where it began,

Now far ahead the Road has gone,

And I must follow, if I can,

Pursuing it with eager feet,

Until it joins some larger way

Where many paths and errands meet.

And whither then? I cannot say.






Then a variation when Frodo, Pippin and Sam are leaving the Shire:




Quote

Frodo was silent. He too was gazing eastward along the road, as if he had never seen it before. Suddenly he spoke, aloud but as if to himself, saying slowly:

The Road goes ever on and on

Down from the door where it began.

Now far ahead the Road has gone,

And I must follow, if I can,

Pursuing it with weary feet,

Until it joins some larger way,

Where many paths and errands meet.

And wither then? I cannot say.



'That sounds like a bit of old Bilbo's rhyming,' said Pippin. 'Or is it one of your imitations? It does not sound altogether encouraging.'
'I don't know,' said Frodo. 'It came to me then as if I was making it up; but I may have heard it long ago. Certainly it reminds me very much of Bilbo in the last years, before he went away. He used often to say there was only one Road; that it was like a great river: its springs were at every doorstep, and every path was its tributary. "It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door," he used to say. "You step into the Road, and if you don't keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to. Do you realize that this is the very path that goes through Mirkwood, and that if you let it, it might take you to the Lonely Mountain or even further and to worse places?" He used to say that on the path outside the front door at Bag End, especially after he had been out for a long walk.'
'Well, the Road won't sweep me anywhere for an hour at least,' said Pippin, unslinging his pack. The others followed his example, putting their packs against the bank and their legs out into the road. After a rest they had a good lunch, and then more rest.



Then there's Bilbo's second variation:


Quote


'I evidently came back by much too straight a road from my trip. I think Gandalf might have shown me round a bit. But then the auction would have been over before I got back, and I should have had even more trouble than I did. Anyway it's too late now; and really I think it's much more comfortable to sit here and hear about it all. The fire's very cosy here, and the food's very good, and there are Elves when you want them. What more could one want?

The Road goes ever on and on

Out from the door where it began.

Now far ahead the Road has gone,

Let others follow it who can!

Let them a journey new begin,

But I at last with weary feet

Will turn towards the lighted inn,

My evening-rest and sleep to meet.'



And as Bilbo murmured the last words his head dropped on his chest and he slept soundly.




But this one stirs my heart the most from Frodo as he leaves for the Havens:




Quote

It was evening, and the stars were glimmering in the eastern sky as they passed the ruined oak and turned and went on down the hill between the hazel-thickets. Sam was silent, deep in his memories. Presently he became aware that Frodo was singing softly to himself, singing the old walking-song, but the words were not quite the same.

Still round the corner there may wait
A new road or secret gate;
And though I oft have passed them by,
A day will come at last when I
Shall take the hidden paths that run
West of the Moon, East of the Sun.


That is going on my headstone. Sounds morbid, but I'm going to have it on a bronze plate on the wall until it needs to be moved ;)



I do dearly love this one, too:



Quote

At last, weary and feeling finally defeated, he sat on a step below the level of the passage-floor and bowed his head into his hands. It was quiet, horribly quiet. The torch, that was already burning low when he arrived, sputtered and went out; and he felt the darkness cover him like a tide. And then softly, to his own surprise, there at the vain end of his long journey and his grief, moved by what thought in his heart he could not tell, Sam began to sing.
His voice sounded thin and quavering in the cold dark tower: the voice of a forlorn and weary hobbit that no listening orc could possibly mistake for the clear song of an Elven-lord. He murmured old childish tunes out of the Shire, and snatches of Mr. Bilbo's rhymes that came into his mind like fleeting glimpses of the country of his home. And suddenly new strength rose in him, and his voice rang out, while words of his own came unbidden to fit the simple tune.

'In western lands beneath the Sun

the flowers may rise in Spring
the trees may bud, the waters run,
the merry finches sing.
Or there may be 'tis cloudless night
and swaying beeches bear
the Elven-stars like jewels white
amid their branching hair.

Though here at journey's end I lie
in darkness buried deep,
beyond all towers strong and high,
beyond all mountain steep
above all shadows rides the Sun
and stars forever dwell:
I will not say the day is done,
nor bid the stars farewell.'




Actually, I think this second stanza needs a bronze plate, too ;)




sample

"Barney Snow was here." ~Hug like a hobbit!~ "In my heaven..."

I really need these new films to take me back to, and not re-introduce me to, that magical world.



TORn's Observations Lists


Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Oct 20 2008, 4:41pm


Views: 813
I love that one too.

It feels like the very heart of LotR. My daughter put it to music a while back:

In Western Lands

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Aunt Dora Baggins
Immortal


Oct 20 2008, 4:43pm


Views: 843
Yep, I love that one too

and it's been so entwined wth Donald Swann's music in my mind for decades that I always hear that music in my mind.

This song is especially poignant for me now, as my mom slips into a last long decline.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"For DORA BAGGINS in memory of a LONG correspondence, with love from Bilbo; on a large wastebasket. Dora was Drogo's sister, and the eldest surviving female relative of Bilbo and Frodo; she was ninety-nine, and had written reams of good advice for more than half a century."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A Chance Meeting at Rivendell" and other stories

leleni at hotmail dot com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



(This post was edited by Aunt Dora Baggins on Oct 20 2008, 4:45pm)


Mar
Gondor


Oct 20 2008, 5:26pm


Views: 806
Goodness gracious that is beautiful. //

 

Most people don't know there are angels whose only job is to make sure you don't get too comfortable - fall asleep and miss your life.


Mar
Gondor


Oct 20 2008, 5:29pm


Views: 806
Yes yes yes with an added gramma *twitch* //

 

Most people don't know there are angels whose only job is to make sure you don't get too comfortable - fall asleep and miss your life.


Ciars
Rohan


Oct 20 2008, 5:36pm


Views: 814
snap!

'And then suddenly new strength rose in him, and his voice rang out, while words of his own came unbidden to fit the simple tune.' it is beautiful! I've mentioned it too further down the thread - great minds eh?


the perfect place to unwind


Rosie-with-the-ribbons
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 20 2008, 6:01pm


Views: 811
My favorite

is the bathing song. It makes me smile and want to join the bathing fun.

And for the rest I must admit Angelic I tend to skip the poems. Now that I read them here they are really beautiful, but I want to keep on reading the story and not the poems. But maybe I should start a re-read but now with the poems.

Yes, I know, NARF, bad girl etc. I love the read but poems never really got me, and the problem is that in Dutch, the poems aren't that nice as in English, and in English it is already a lot of work just to read the story, reading poetry is than a bit more difficult.


Ataahua
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 20 2008, 7:00pm


Views: 812
*mwahahahahaa*

>:)

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Elwen
Lorien


Oct 20 2008, 7:19pm


Views: 809
Not sure I can call it my favorite....

but I'd like to put in two cents for Princess Mee. My mom used to read that when I was little and I got quite the giggle out of it.

I actually really love any of the songs in elvish. They are just beautiful to look at as well as listen to the Professor read. (on the recording I have)


visualweasel
Rohan


Oct 20 2008, 7:46pm


Views: 840
The Tale of Tinúviel

I won't type out the entire poem (more than 70 lines), but this has always been my favorite — in part because of the beauty of the tale and the imagery through which it is told, and in part because of the clever interwoven structure of the ann-thennath mode. Here's the first stanza:

The leaves were long, the grass was green,
The hemlock-umbels tall and fair,
And in the glade a light was seen
Of stars in shadow shimmering.
Tinúviel was dancing there
To music of a pipe unseen,
And light of stars was in her hair,
And in her raiment glimmering.


Jason Fisher
Lingwë - Musings of a Fish


The Lord of the Rings discussion 2007-2008 – The Two Towers – III.4 “Treebeard” – Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 21 2008, 12:26am


Views: 800
Harumpf - you're supposed to come up with the next line!

Angelic


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I desired dragons with a profound desire"

"It struck me last night that you might write a fearfully good romantic drama, with as much of the 'supernatural' as you cared to introduce. Have you ever thought of it?"
-Geoffrey B. Smith, letter to JRR Tolkien, 1915


Ataahua
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 21 2008, 2:37am


Views: 798
"A stab to the kneecap..."

...

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 21 2008, 2:53am


Views: 794
Said Merry, "My dear chap," /

 


My writing (including The Passing of Mistress Rose)

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Roheryn
Tol Eressea

Oct 21 2008, 4:48am


Views: 786
*snert* I'll second that!

 


Roheryn
Tol Eressea

Oct 21 2008, 5:11am


Views: 809
Take that, you vexatious old thang--aarrRRGH!"

 


dernwyn
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 21 2008, 10:32am


Views: 776
*applauds* Perfect! ;-D //

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I desired dragons with a profound desire"

"It struck me last night that you might write a fearfully good romantic drama, with as much of the 'supernatural' as you cared to introduce. Have you ever thought of it?"
-Geoffrey B. Smith, letter to JRR Tolkien, 1915


Jettorex
Lorien


Oct 21 2008, 1:46pm


Views: 781
for a Friday night...

Hey! Ho! To the bottle I go.
To heal my heart and drown my woe.
Rain may fall and wind may blow,
But there still be many miles to go.

Sweet is the sound of the pouring rain,
And the stream that falls from hill to plain.
Better than rain or rippling brook...
Is a mug of beer inside this Took!

Love, Truth, Honor, Adventure


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 21 2008, 9:45pm


Views: 772
Hmm, not quite by Tolkien.

I expect this point has been noted many times before.

The first four lines come from one Tolkien song, but the first and fourth lines have been modified. Where the film has, "Hey! Ho! To the bottle I go", the book has "Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go", and the film's "But there still be many miles to go" is adapted from the book's "And many miles be still to go"

The next four lines come from a different Tolkien song, but the second, third and fourth lines have been changed. Tolkien's "And the brook that leaps from hill to plain" becomes Jackson's "And the stream that falls from hill to plain", while "But better than rain or rippling streams" is now "Better than rain or rippling brook". The film's last line, "Is a mug of beer inside this Took!" derives more or less from the book's "Better is beer, if drink we lack".

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We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Oct. 20-26 for "The Houses of Healing".

****************************************
And we're discussing Tolkien's classic essay, "On Fairy-stories", Oct. 20-Nov. 30. This week:

"The definition of a fairy-story – what it is, or what it should be – does not, then, depend on any definition or historical account of elf or fairy, but upon the nature of Faërie: the Perilous Realm itself, and the air that blows in that country."

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Laerasëa
Tol Eressea


Oct 22 2008, 12:17am


Views: 777
Ooh! I have to show you my favorite parody of that...

(not LOTR-related)

*grabbing my American poetry book...*

This Is Just To Say
by Erica Lynn Gambino (1991)
(for William Carlos Williams)

I have just
asked you to
get out of my
apartment

even though
you never
thought I would

Forgive me
you were
driving
me insane

********************************
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Collatine
The Shire

Oct 22 2008, 2:31am


Views: 765
The Lay of Luthien

As recorded in Lays of Beleriand has to be one of the most impressive poems (from a technical standpoint) to come out of the 20th century... aside from being so moving a story.

And Aragorn reciting it at Weathertop is especially moving, considering who he must of been thinking of at the time.

Do wounds help wounds or grief help grievous deeds? -Shakespeare


squire
Half-elven


Oct 22 2008, 3:49am


Views: 762
Now I lie me down to Lay, or is it Lay me down to lie....

It's a common misperception to think that Strider recites the Lay of Luthien at Weathertop. In fact he recites a much shorter poetic treatment of the Luthien legend called "As light as leaf on Linden-tree". Check it out: the meter and rhyme scheme (an-thannath!) is quite different from the epic Lay.

You're right about the emotion underlying Strider's recitation. Interestingly, the "Linden-tree" verses, sung on Weathertop to cheer up the frightened hobbits, were originally composed to cheer up young Turin during a dangerous part of his journey to Thingol's court. They were inserted, somewhat awkwardly, into the alliterative-style Lay of the Children of Hurin (which is also published in the Lays of Beleriand).

I agree that the Lay of Luthien is technically impressive. Few critics have taken the time to do a really close reading of the work, and the fact that it is unfinished makes it hard to render a final judgment as to its artistic quality. The most succinct criticism I've read is that the monotony of the meter gets you down after a few thousand lines or so, despite Tolkien's heroic efforts to vary the prosody. Some of the passages are really good, though, for instance the sex scene in Canto III when Beren finally catches her, and the big climax in Canto XIII with Luthien's seduction and defeat of Morgoth.



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Footeramas: The 3rd TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion; and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 22 2008, 4:56am


Views: 764
"The Lay of Leithian".

Although somewhere in a History of Middle-earth text there is a reference to the "Lay of Lúthien" (to the consternation of Christopher Tolkien, as I recall) the long unfinished poems about Beren and Lúthien published in The Lays of Beleriand are actually titled "The Gest of Beren and Lúthien" or "The Lay of Leithian".

Collantine: for more on the history of Aragorn's "Tale of Tinúviel", the poem that Aragorn translated from the ann-thennath mode of Sindarin as he and the hobbits awaited the arrival of the Black Riders at Weathertop, see squire's earlier post here.

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Oct. 20-26 for "The Houses of Healing".

****************************************
And we're discussing Tolkien's classic essay, "On Fairy-stories", Oct. 20-Nov. 30. This week:

"The definition of a fairy-story – what it is, or what it should be – does not, then, depend on any definition or historical account of elf or fairy, but upon the nature of Faërie: the Perilous Realm itself, and the air that blows in that country."

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Kimi
Forum Admin / Moderator


Oct 22 2008, 6:03am


Views: 754
Appendix A.

Not just "somewhere in a History of Middle-earth text" :-)

From "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen" in Appendix A:

"For Aragorn had been singing a part of the Lay of Lúthien which tells of the meeting of Lúthien and Beren in the forest of Neldoreth."


My writing (including The Passing of Mistress Rose)

Do we find happiness so often that we should turn it off the box when it happens to sit there?

- A Room With a View


Jettorex
Lorien


Oct 22 2008, 2:52pm


Views: 739
Very interesting

I did not know that-thanks for the info. I assumed that PJ had taken straight from the book. Appears PJ also took alot of "artistic license" not only with charactors, timelines etc. but with actual songs! Fascinating-especially since that he found 2 different songs from 2 different places in the book and combined them to do this.

I guess he changed it to make a drinking song to fit the scene he wanted.

Thanks NEB-you are a veritable cornucopia of Tolien Knowledge. Now I am off to find the songs in the book as Tolkein wrote them. Can you point me to the chapter(s)?

Love, Truth, Honor, Adventure


N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 22 2008, 3:31pm


Views: 631
Hammond and Scull?

Then I'm guessing it was Wayne H. and Christina S. in their LotR companion, and not Christopher T. in HoMe. Thanks, Kimi!

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We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Oct. 20-26 for "The Houses of Healing".

****************************************
And we're discussing Tolkien's classic essay, "On Fairy-stories", Oct. 20-Nov. 30. This week:

"The definition of a fairy-story – what it is, or what it should be – does not, then, depend on any definition or historical account of elf or fairy, but upon the nature of Faërie: the Perilous Realm itself, and the air that blows in that country."

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N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 22 2008, 3:32pm


Views: 624
I.iv and I.v.

That is: "A Shortcut to Mushrooms" and "A Conspiracy Unmasked".

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We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Oct. 20-26 for "The Houses of Healing".

****************************************
And we're discussing Tolkien's classic essay, "On Fairy-stories", Oct. 20-Nov. 30. This week:

"The definition of a fairy-story – what it is, or what it should be – does not, then, depend on any definition or historical account of elf or fairy, but upon the nature of Faërie: the Perilous Realm itself, and the air that blows in that country."

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Jettorex
Lorien


Oct 22 2008, 5:20pm


Views: 621
thanks

much obliged!

Love, Truth, Honor, Adventure


squire
Half-elven


Oct 23 2008, 1:39am


Views: 626
Consternation or confirmation?

Hammond and Scull, in their LotR Companion, reveal that they asked Christopher Tolkien if Aragorn's singing of the "Lay of Luthien" in the "Tale of Aragorn and Arwen" is a misprint for the now-well-known "Lay of Leithian". CT answered that it is not a misprint: JRRT himself often informally referred to the Lay as "Luthien", presumably because it is, after all, about her.

In the Lays of Beleriand (HoME III, pp. 188-89), CT discusses the tangled links between the words Luthien and Leithian. It seems that originally they meant the same thing (Luthany = England, if you really want to know!), but the words diverged in Tolkien's usage. Eventually Luthien became the given name of the princess formerly known as Tinuviel, and Leithian became an Elvish word signifying "Release from Bondage".

But as CT himself uneasily concedes, the words sounded alike. They still do, though years have rolled over their heads.

I still find the title confusing and easy to mix up with the name Luthien, as you can see from my earlier post, above!



squire online:
RR Discussions: The Valaquenta, A Shortcut to Mushrooms, and Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit
Lights! Action! Discuss on the Movie board!: 'A Journey in the Dark'. and 'Designing The Two Towers'.
Footeramas: The 3rd TORn Reading Room LotR Discussion; and "Tolkien would have LOVED it!"
squiretalk introduces the J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: A Reader's Diary


a.s.
Valinor


Oct 23 2008, 10:28am


Views: 612
PJ also changed Frodo's "Walking Song"

I think someone has already commented on this in this thread, but I can't seem to find it. Sorry to repeat.

PJ also adapted at least one other poem (may be more, I just can't remember another example right now). He used part of the last verse of Frodo's "Walking Song" from the "Three is Company" chapter, but changed some of the words at the end. You'll recognize it as the song Pippin sings to Denethor:


Home is behind, the world ahead,
And there are many paths to tread
Through shadows to the edge of night,
Until the stars are all alight.
Then world behind and home ahead,
We'll wander back to home and bed.
Mist and twilight, cloud and shade,
Away shall fade! Away shall fade!
Fire and lamp and meat and bread,
And then to bed! And then to bed!



I actually quite like the tune Billy Boyd made for this song, but now when I read the poem in the book I can only hear that tune, rather than just a spoken rythym that sounds (in my mind) like trudging feet. Oh well.

a.s.

"an seileachan"

Pooh began to feel a little more comfortable, because when you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.

"You only see the outside of me"


silneldor
Half-elven


Oct 23 2008, 3:30pm


Views: 614
Thanks NEB

For this and the other. Great funLaugh.

"Tolkien, like Lewis, believed that, through story, the real world would become a more magical place, full of meaning. We see its patterns and colors in a fresh way. The recovery of a true view of the world applies both to individual things, like hills and stones, and to the cosmic - the depths of space and time itself. For in sub-creation, in Tolkien's view, there is a "survey" of space and time. Reality is captured on a miniature scale. Through stories like The Lord of the Rings, a renewed view of things is given, illuminating the homely, the spiritial, the physical, and the moral dimensions of the world."

Tolkien and C.S. Lewis- The Gift of Friendship -Duriez

After Sunset
I have an understanding with the hills
At evening, when slanted radiance fills
Their hollows, and the great winds let them be,
And they are quiet and look down at me.
Oh, then I see the patience in their eyes
Out of the centuries that made them wise.
They lend me hoarded memory, and I learn
Their thoughts of granite and their whims of fern,
And why a dream of forests must endure
Though every tree be slain; and how the pure,
Invisible beauty has a word so brief
A flower can say it, or a shaken leaf,
But few may ever snare it in a song,
Though for the quest a life is not too long.
When the blue hills grow tender, when they pull
The twilight close with gesture beautiful,
And shadows are their garments, and the air
Deepens, and the wild veery is at prayer,
Their arms are strong around me; and I know
That somehow I shall follow where you go
To the still land beyond the evening star,
Where everlasting hills and valleys are,
And silence may not hurt us any more,
And terror shall be past, and grief and war.

Grace Hazard Conkling (conclusion of a song recital from the book Lake Minnewaska by W Doughty where he says ''this is not the end of songs which we are certain will continue to rise from gifted minds and hearts in this enchanted realm where sometimes 'great mists lie' but always where 'great dreams rise' ''.) ...Reminds me particularly of the elves and the ents


May the grace of Manwë let us soar with eagle's wings!

In the air, among the clouds in the sky
Here is where the birds of Manwe fly
Looking at the land, and the water that flows
The true beauty of earth shows
With the stars of Varda lighting my way
In all the realms this is where I stay
In the realm of Manwë Súlimo
By El~Cugu

From the website: 'The Realm of Manwe'








N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Oct 23 2008, 3:42pm


Views: 610
Thanks!

 

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Oct. 20-26 for "The Houses of Healing".

****************************************
And we're discussing Tolkien's classic essay, "On Fairy-stories", Oct. 20-Nov. 30. This week:

"The definition of a fairy-story – what it is, or what it should be – does not, then, depend on any definition or historical account of elf or fairy, but upon the nature of Faërie: the Perilous Realm itself, and the air that blows in that country."

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How to find old Reading Room discussions.


Morthoron
Gondor


Oct 24 2008, 1:42am


Views: 603
There can be only one...

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

No poem in Tolkien's corpus holds as much weight, nor are there any that have such a presentiment of foreboding, looming like a storm cloud over all characters in Lord of the Rings.

THE EARL OF SANDWICH: "Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"
JOHN WILKES: That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."
John Wilkes (1727-1797)


batik
Tol Eressea


Oct 24 2008, 3:45am


Views: 616
"When Spring unfolds the beechen leaf, and sap is in the bough;...

...And far away will find a land where both our hearts may rest."

"Treebeard"