The One Ring Forums: Tolkien Topics: Movie Discussion: The Hobbit:
OT (?) Of Hellboy II...



Guillermo
Rivendell

Jun 2 2008, 11:51pm


Views: 5240
OT (?) Of Hellboy II...

As the opening of "Hellboy II: The Golden Army" draws near I feel the urge to reiterate a fair warning. The Aesthetics of the film are quite "Pop" and colorful and -obviously- more influenced by the hyper-saturated palette of a Kirby comic book than a Fairy Tale or a Fantasy work.

Please do not get confused by either the palette of the film or its tone. It uses the comedic and interpersonal banter from the first film and the monster design is quite outlandish and colorful. We made a deliberate move away from the Celtic / Nordic aesthetics present in most Fantasy films because we knew we could NOT out do bigger productions (like LOTR) at that game.

We are a $85 m dollar film and we tried to find our own "look" so we endeavoured to create a very idiosyncratic melange of Arabic architecture and design and Oriental motifs. We took Japanese suit of armour patterns allowed it to be imbued by Celtic motifs, etc- you can see some of that in the trailer.

Our Elfland is more akin to Dunsany or perhaps even Moorcock in its aesthetics, using the stark contrast of dark against white skin and golden eyes.

Our magical world is broader and freer -even surreal at times- and suits the tone of this film.

I am exceedingly aware of Genres and moreso when I mix them and / or mix them together. Most of Hellboy will give you almost no indication of what will come to pass with the HOBBIT. There is, however a PROLOGUE done with Old Wooden Puppets that will share some faint traces that eventually you will be able to find in certain passages in the forthcoming movie. But even then, please do not take this as a verbatim through line.

When I started HBII I had NO inkling that the HOBBIT would really come my way and I wanted to use the Fantasy Worlds that lie beneath as a metaphor of all that mankind is extinguishing with its unedning greed.

It is my dearest hope that this message will prevent speculation of what in "Pan's Labyrinth" or "Hellboy II" will indicate what the HOBBIT will be. In time there will be definite aesthetic choices that will guide the film towards a yuxtaposition of PJ's and my visual proclivities but I think it will only be visible in retrospect and it would be almost impossible -and rather perverse- to try and divine it at this stage.

The same goes for tone and theme. Nevertheless, if some of you enjoyed the first :Hellboy" or "Pan's Labyrinth" for that matter I would love to have you grace a theater with your derriere and allow our tale to find you-

All the Best

GDT


merklynn
Lorien


Jun 3 2008, 12:03am


Views: 1843
Magic vs Science

So... you're saying don't pre-judge The Hobbit film's potential look or palette based upon Hellboy II because the latter is inspired by a comic book and a different sort of fantasy world.

I saw the trailer for the film before Indiana Jones last Friday, and by the end of the film I wish I had been watching Hellboy II instead. I like the hidden fairy world rising up against mankind, and I suspect I will be on their side during the film. I think its all well and good that Hellboy wants to protect the humans, but since I'm a Lovecraftian misanthrope, maybe the fairies would do a better job with keeping the world in order than our resource guzzling, environmentally destructive kin.

I suppose thematically, their is a touch of Tolkien in there. The Ents vs Orthanc... ie Nature vs Industry. Or magic vs science.

I should really look up the actor playing the lead villain in Hellboy II, he has quite an Elf like air to him. Maybe he would be a charming King Thranduil?

I'm looking forward to Hellboy II. My wife saw Sex and the City and wants to take me to see it. Maybe I can get to see Hellboy II instead.


Woodyend
Gondor


Jun 3 2008, 12:12am


Views: 1608
My husband and I loved Hellboy so much...

We have both the theatrical version and the directors cut. We seldom go to the cinema anymore but we will make an exception for H2. Thanks for taking the time to give us all heads up.

May your beer be laid under an enchantment of surpassing excellence for seven years!
~~~~~~~~Gandalf~~~~~~~
Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!


Ataahua
Superuser / Moderator


Jun 3 2008, 12:22am


Views: 1563
Heh - good luck with that.


In Reply To
It is my dearest hope that this message will prevent speculation of what in "Pan's Labyrinth" or "Hellboy II" will indicate what the HOBBIT will be.



I'm sure there will be speculation from people who wouldn't have seen your message before viewing Hellboy II, and those who had read your message but chose to believe their own fears instead. I'll be keeping a link to your post in my files for reposting in the future, as I'm sure it will come in handy during future intense discussions. ;)

Are you having a bit of a breather after Hellboy II and before you get into the nitty-gritty of The Hobbit?

Celebrimbor: "Pretty rings..."
Dwarves: "Pretty rings..."
Men: "Pretty rings..."
Sauron: "Mine's better."

"Ah, how ironic, the addictive qualities of Sauron’s master weapon led to its own destruction. Which just goes to show, kids - if you want two small and noble souls to succeed on a mission of dire importance... send an evil-minded b*****d with them too." - Gandalf's Diaries, final par, by Ufthak.


Ataahua's stories


Laerasëa
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 12:24am


Views: 1526
Well,

for me, the fact that the same person who directed Pan's Labyrinth also did Hellboy indicates to me that I should not judge another movie coming out from that director based on a previous one. Just based on those two, it's kind of tough for me to come up with a style that you use, if that makes sense- other than that kind of wild imagination that allows you to create almost whatever you want- like the Pale Man, in PL, or....well for HB, I'm mostly thinking of the creatures (whatever they were) that I saw in the trailer. Don't get me wrong- I really like both of those films (and I don't think I'd really hesitate to tell a director that I was not a fan of his films if I had a legit reason), but there is something incomparable about them, too: I will expect HBII to be in the same style as HB, but I will not expect the style of PL. Maybe that sounds like a kind of obvious thing to say, but that then goes for any other movie that you make- The Hobbit is a different style from HB (a comic book) and PL (a parable, almost)- so given the fact that you were able to change the styles for those two types of films, I don't have any worries about The Hobbit. If that all made sense.

edit- I'm also looking forward to HBII!!! When I mentioned the trailer, it was because I'd seen it lots of times! Laugh
Thank you!


********************************
I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying. - Oscar Wilde
This is a work of fiction. All the characters in it, human and otherwise, are imaginary, excepting only certain of the fairy folk, whom it might be unwise to offend by casting doubts on their existence. Or lack thereof. -Neil Gaiman
Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter. - Mark Twain
You're dead if you aim only for kids. Adults are only kids grown up, anyway. - Walt Disney
Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils. - Louis Hector Berlioz
Don't use words too big for the subject. Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. -C.S. Lewis




(This post was edited by laerasea on Jun 3 2008, 12:27am)


Telperion313
The Shire


Jun 3 2008, 12:30am


Views: 1541
You had me at

"Arabic architecture and design and Oriental motifs". That's right up my alley. This'll be one of the three summer movies I see, along with The Happening and The Dark Knight. I already saw Indy Jones, though I wish I could take it back. It looks like Hboy 2 is going to pack a serious visual punch, and a nice way to start the summer! I can't wait to see what happens when your imagination enters PJ's world.

Coming to theaters, Summer 2012...

The Lord of the Rings 2: Back in the "Ring" of Things...

A wacky teen comedy in which Frodo, Merry, and Pippin are always trying to "get some". Don't miss it.


Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 12:42am


Views: 1510
It is great of you to come by and post this.

As Ataahua said above, it will be a great fire extinguisher in days to come.

Thanks for taking time to post this. Rest assured 95% of forummers here are now aware of what you intend to do with The Hobbit, and have no fears of the hypothetical situation you presented, but is great to confirm how you take the community into consideration.

As far as Hellboy goes, I liked the first film, and rest assured I'll be buying a ticket for Golden Army. We have to support community members, you know? Wink

Best of luck with the film!

PS: We'll be watching the wooden puppets closely, hehe.

Here's to Del Toro becoming the Irvin Kershner of Middle Earth!

Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!


MrCere
Sr. Staff


Jun 3 2008, 1:51am


Views: 1632
We try to support the artistic endeavors of those in our message board community

Although this "Hellboy II" flick might have a little bit wider commercial appeal than most of the efforts of our friends here. Tongue

I have often wondered why people (the press, moviegoers, Hollywood) want so desperately to classify and label artists. Why is it assumed that these great talents can only do one thing?

Some artists, directors or actors, break out of this typecasting but many can never escape it.

How sad if after "Jaws" Steven Spielberg was never allowed to make "Schiendler's List" because he was relegated to directing oceanic thrillers or man vs. nature films.

Tom Hanks was in "The Bachelor" and "Big" but the public allowed his to make some more serious films. What if we hadn't? What if he were forever stuck as a comedian?

I don't expect Guillermo to make the same movie with the same sensibilities over and over. "Blade II" doesn't feel like "Pan's L," or "The Devil's Backbone," and if "HB2" felt like a trip to Middle-earth, I would be ticked off!

I think it is wise of GDT to post this here and will make a handy reference for us but it shouldn't even be slightly necessary. Ideally we would allow creators to create differently and to create new things.

My question for the group (including the guy who brought it up) is why?

Why do we expect artists to do the same thing over and over? Why ? Why do we consume the same actors in the same roles and thank the same directors and studios for allowing us to recycle the same plots? Why why why!?!?!?

Evil Any help is much appreciated.

I have no choice but to believe in free will.

The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie




MrCere
Sr. Staff


Jun 3 2008, 1:52am


Views: 1510
There is some great source material

You really should read some Hellboy graphic novels if you enjoyed it that much. The film captures the spirit of the character and universe very well.

I have no choice but to believe in free will.

The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie




Woodyend
Gondor


Jun 3 2008, 2:05am


Views: 1470
Thanks for the info I will.

I thought HB was only in comic book form, a medium I'm not very fond of. Of all the comic book characters that have been brought to screen, I think GDT HB is the best fleshed out. Because of this, I never had any fears that he would not treat The Hobbit with the same care.

May your beer be laid under an enchantment of surpassing excellence for seven years!
~~~~~~~~Gandalf~~~~~~~
Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!


merklynn
Lorien


Jun 3 2008, 2:20am


Views: 1472
Pigeon-holing

I think we all live by labels. It is human culture to categorize things in order to memorize and learn from them. We do it from birth. One experience leads us to define another. One example, gives us something to measure another by. With films, particularly ones we enjoy, we want to revisit those same moods and themes. It is important that we all understand that the categories into which we lump things in our minds are not rigid and that there are constantly new twists and surprises for each of us when we discover something that does not fit perfectly into one or another. So understanding this and keeping aware of it is the best way to remain open minded in general.

Personally, one of the lessons I have found hardest to learn over the years, but I think I have finally grasped it, is that adaptations are simply that. Adaptations. Interpretations of one person, or group of people. Their differences alone should not be enough to diminish their enjoyment. Differences in taste however are fair game to all, and politely respecting that someone's version of a story differs from your own, is the best way to handle it. In PJs case I enjoyed the Frighteners, and Heavenly Creatures, but was never big into gore and did not like his earlier stuff, purely because of my own sensibilities. But there are few better examples thant Guillermo and Peter when it comes to the range of films they want to tackle. I think Lovely Bones, King Kong, LOTR, Heavenly Creatures, The Frighteners, Brain Dead / Dead Alive are about as wide ranging a canvass as a director can have. Guillermo has a very similar range of genres with The Devil's Backbone, Pan's Labyrinth, Blade II, and Hellboy, not to mention those I have not yet seen. So what I'm trying to say is that I'm not sucking up, I'll be the first to post in these forums that The Hobbit didn't work for me if it didn't, but I expect to give GDT the respect that it is his interpretation. No one can touch my own personal Middle-earth after all.

The facts are both directors as artists are capable of many forms of expression and have many interests. It is a shame that they can become pigeon-holed by the industy, much like actors can become stereotyped. Take my new signature for example... am I not stereotyping? To be honest, I don't think so, since the particular shots are taken from a time travel film... but we all have expectations of what our hero should look like, and what a book should look like in our heads. Some people want to be surprised, others want the director and their own vision to match as closely as possible. I fall somewhere between the two, but I respect that it is GDTs project, not mine.



(This post was edited by merklynn on Jun 3 2008, 2:23am)


Darkstone
Immortal


Jun 3 2008, 2:26am


Views: 1469
Well

Why do we eat at a McDonald's franchise rather than the excellent family owned restaurant down the street?

Familiarity is comforting.

Most people are uncomfortable trying new things.

Similarly Hollywood moguls feel comfortable with proven people in proven roles with proven ideas.

Like us they fear trying anything new. Even moreso since with them if it failed they might get fired. However if something proven fails, they can disclaim any responsibility and point to the unpredictable mass audience. It's our fault, not theirs.

And in the end it is indeed our fault. The Hollywood moguls only give us what we want. If we all watched only high quality films then they'd make only high quality films. They're not that smart, and they're not that stupid. They're just scared.

Undoubtedly you already know all this.

******************************************
The audacious proposal stirred his heart. And the stirring became a song, and it mingled with the songs of Gil-galad and Celebrian, and with those of Feanor and Fingon. The song-weaving created a larger song, and then another, until suddenly it was as if a long forgotten memory woke and for one breathtaking moment the Music of the Ainur revealed itself in all glory. He opened his lips to sing and share this song. Then he realized that the others would not understand. Not even Mithrandir given his current state of mind. So he smiled and simply said "A diversion.”



(This post was edited by Darkstone on Jun 3 2008, 2:27am)


Compa_Mighty
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 3:13am


Views: 1456
Renaissance men and the rest...

Renaissance man is a term my father is deeply fond of, it is something he has dreamt of being his whole life and something he has tried to educate my brother and I in.

To understand what a Renaissance man is, we have to define how we will be defining a common man.

A man takes refuge in what he knows, and knowledge is so vast, it is easier to specialize in one thing, rather than know a lot of many things.

A non-Renaissance man can be a genius, don't get me wrong: we have Homer, who dedicated himself to epics, and we have Alexander who dedicated to tactics... and we have Stephen Hawking who has dedicated himself to physics. All brilliant men in their field of expertise, but they were/are people that dare not (or cannot) go into other fields.

And then, there's DaVinci and Michelangelo, the Renaissance men. People who sculpted, wrote, painted and did things almost too amazing to be attributed to a single man. Isaac Asimov was a Renaissance men, writing about history, politics, fiction...

Those are expceptions, most people have good abilities for something and not for other things, and that's why we can call a writer a "fiction writer" or a "terror writer". They work in their comfort zone and they do it great.

As someone said, we need to label things as humans... they say the human trait by excellence is language, and what is language but the labelling of phenomanae that surround us. If it does not have a name, how can we refer to it?

Of course that extends to a personal level. We label ourselves. Studies show that men are inclined to label themselves as "I am an engineer/lawyer" "I am the creator of", "the author of", showing their achievements; in contrast women tend to label themselves as "the wife/sister/mother of" by their relationships with other people. We label ourselves in what we do, and we do tend to exploit what we know best, as opposed to probing unknown waters.

Here's to Del Toro becoming the Irvin Kershner of Middle Earth!

Essay winner of the Show us your Hobbit Pride Giveway!


entmaiden
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jun 3 2008, 3:26am


Views: 1427
I'm hoping to rent Cronos

in the next couple weeks. Thanks for the heads-up about HB II. I just saw the original HellBoy a couple weeks ago and was very impressed with the visualization. Of course, I adored Pan's Labrynth. I think, if one were to look at the body of your work, they could see patterns, but it would be difficult to project specific visualization themes, and even more difficult to extrapolate your plans for The Hobbit.

Best of luck with the upcoming premieres!

Each cloak was fastened about the neck with a brooch like a green leaf veined with silver.
`Are these magic cloaks?' asked Pippin, looking at them with wonder.
`I do not know what you mean by that,' answered the leader of the Elves.


NARF since 1974.
Balin Bows


Empedocles
Rivendell


Jun 3 2008, 3:35am


Views: 1397
I'll definitely be there...

I've seen Hellboy II's trailer so many times, as well as all the wonderful ancillary material on the webpage, that I just can't wait to see it. The art design seems to be incredible, the mixture of pulp and mythology, the dialogues, the creatures, the score (if the music that I hear on the trailer is actually the score), everything seems wonderful. Except for the Hetfet game, which I started to play only to discover two weeks later that it was only for US residents, which I'm not going to lie to you, pissed me off a little bit, but it was my fault for not reading the terms and conditions anyway.

I'm sure the look of the Hobbit will be different from the look of Hellboy but there's something which I'm looking forward to see in The Hobbit too. There's an epic feeling in most of the movies you've made, even in the most intimate ones like Pan's Labyrinth and The Devil's Backbone, (and that is present more than ever in the trailer), that I truly hope to see replicated in The Hobbit.

Thank you so much for taking the time to post here. I have no doubt that Hellboy will be a success and the best of lucks in the final countdown.

Please, give us back Glorfindel!!!


entmaiden
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jun 3 2008, 3:43am


Views: 1436
Because most of Hollywood is derivative

Movies have become too safe, and most of what gets made these days has to fit in with established formulas. I attribute that to the ownership of the studios - all, or nearly all, are owned by public corporations. Those owners are motivated by quarterly results, and they are under tremendous pressure to make their numbers, if not to beat expectations. So movies have adapted the same methodology - managing expectations is viewed as being successful.

I know you enjoy film, and film festivals, and the behind-the-scenes conversations that occur between people in the industry. When I attend the Traverse City Film Festival, one of the major highlights is the daily panel discussions when directors, studio presidents and actors talk about the business of film. The participants, to a person, loathe the current system. They are committed to returning to quality films, and encouraging each other to take a chance and make something outside the mainstream. The problem, of course, is money. Movies have become expensive to make, and even the major studios can't finance their own movies. One individual, or even a small group of individuals, are taking an enormous risk just to make one quality movie. But the major studios won't touch anything that doesn't fit their expectations of a "successful" movie.

I was saddened last summer when, after the Film Festival, my brother told me a story about one of his co-workers that lived in town. They said they didn't attend one of the Film Festival movies because "they had never heard of the movies being shown". They are the perfect consumer for the blockbuster-type of movie, but unwilling to take a chance on gems like "The Valet" or "Once". I'm sad for them because of what they missed, and sad for the quality movies that will never get made.

So what can we do? We can support independent movies by watching them in theaters, buying the DVDs. Show the studios that we want more than the latest rip-off movie.

Of course, we Tolkien fans are so lucky. We have three major studio movies that were made to the highest quality standards, and we have people involved in The Hobbit movies that are just as committed to giving us the same quality in the last two films.

Each cloak was fastened about the neck with a brooch like a green leaf veined with silver.
`Are these magic cloaks?' asked Pippin, looking at them with wonder.
`I do not know what you mean by that,' answered the leader of the Elves.


NARF since 1974.
Balin Bows


tedster88
The Shire

Jun 3 2008, 4:45am


Views: 1389
I'll be watching!

I will be going to Hellboy 2 definatley looks like a good film, although point taken a lot of the movie making techniques in HB2 won't be used in Th Hobbit!
Awesome of GDT to post on these message boards! Cool


Silverlode
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jun 3 2008, 4:52am


Views: 1413
Because thinking outside the box involves risk.

And risk means admitting the possibility of failure. And nobody likes failure, especially when money is involved.

Studios love the idea of the "sure thing". They want to be sure of making money.

The media loves labels, because it's easier to cater and talk to a pre-defined audience. They want to be sure that people will buy what they're selling.

And audiences like the idea of repeating a familiar pleasurable experience. They want to know that they won't consider their money wasted.

Of course, there is no such thing as a "sure thing", and media demographics are often inaccurate and audiences can be fickle, and that familiar place doesn't always retain the magic the second (or third) time around, so failure is always a possibility no matter what. But if you don't risk as much, you won't lose as much.

If you risk much, you may attain greatness. Maybe. And that's where it gets scary.

Silverlode

"Of all faces those of our familiares are the ones both most difficult to play fantastic tricks with, and most difficult really to see with fresh attention. They have become like the things which once attracted us by their glitter, or their colour, or their shape, and we laid hands on them, and then locked them in our hoard, acquired them, and acquiring ceased to look at them.
Creative fantasy, because it is mainly trying to do something else [make something new], may open your hoard and let all the locked things fly away like cage-birds. The gems all turn into flowers or flames, and you will be warned that all you had (or knew) was dangerous and potent, not really effectively chained, free and wild; no more yours than they were you."
-On Fairy Stories


Voorhas
Lorien


Jun 3 2008, 4:55am


Views: 1449
You Had Me at "Dunsany"

Sir,

I'm impressed with the caliber of names you're conjuring with: names like Dunsany, Rackham, Kirby, Friedrich, Leiber, and even Moorcock (who can coexist with Tolkien). Whether visual artists or artists with written words, these are the kinda talents to inspiration from. So many amazing daydreams to be found there.

It's probably wise for you to underline the inherent differences between projects like Hellboy II and The Hobbit, but I think discerning viewers will "get it." I look forward to both films.

"They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." -- E.A. Poe

(This post was edited by Voorhas on Jun 3 2008, 4:58am)


Kangi Ska
Half-elven


Jun 3 2008, 5:51am


Views: 1409
SPECULATION

I trust your judgement. Your past work shows the remarkable care you take in choosing the look of each of your projects. It will be fun to see what you have done with HB2 and (down the road) what you will do on your journey into Middle Earth.

Kangi Ska


Eledhwen
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jun 3 2008, 6:09am


Views: 1426
It took Spielberg years to make Schindler's List

Though that was partly because of problems finding the right script, and Jurassic Park got in the way for a bit. So he almost was relegated to the blockbuster action movies - thank heavens he wasn't.

Funnily enough you could argue that PJ and LOTR goes against type too, as his filmography prior to LOTR was low-budget splatter and quirky arthouse (Heavenly Creatures). I think personally I prefer it when directors get to play around with genres - each different genre can inform the next to the benefit of all.

Figwit Still Lives!



Calling for a Figwit cameo in The Hobbit since May 2008


Kangi Ska
Half-elven


Jun 3 2008, 6:12am


Views: 1405
Hear Hear

Categories are useful lies. They fail when you believe they are absolutes. (A friend called this "Hardening if the Categories)

All dichotomies are false.

Humans build taxonomies to simplify the overwhealming amount of information involved in any attempt to understand reality. They shield us from the chaos. Again they fail when we believe that they are real.

Kangi Ska


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Jun 3 2008, 9:27am


Views: 1464
As someone who appreciates

films, directors, producers, players, etc., for me there's a comfort-zone in being able to rest in the familiarity of a director's/actor's performance. It's my main formula for escapism, I guess. I don't like seeing actors I like die in their films or be evil (i.e. Elijah Wood as a cannibal in Sin City or getting zapped in Ice Storm) since I enjoy where they take me and I can feel safe that I won't have my fragile reality in relation to them torqued out of shape. I can handle diversions from a formula they're usually identified with (i.e. Meg Ryan in a comedy/love film into a boxing film); but a wide swing from what I've come to trust in them will break that trust and I'll avoid their work until I know it's "safe" to watch.

I consider myself a pretty typical viewer in being faithful to a "type" of film (no slasher/gory stuff), and I am frightfully loyal to directors/players I identify with; but I'm also adamant about NOT supporting a film or player in anything or everything they do if it's something that disturbs me. I'll probably never see Brain Dead, but I love LotR and can't wait to see The Lovely Bones! *twitch*

My whole thing about films is to escape and, in a way, go on a journey with my filmic friends when they bring out new work... but I won't expose my fragile psyche to depressive/futile works. If I want to be jolted like that, I'll go pay my bills or clean my house ;)



sample sample
Trust him... The Hobbit is coming!

"Barney Snow was here." ~Hug like a hobbit!~ "In my heaven..."


TORn's Observations Lists


Guillermo
Rivendell

Jun 3 2008, 9:56am


Views: 2037
Dear Voorhas

Dunsany is used only nominally on Hellboy, by naming the old world beneath, "Bethmoora" but he was a source of great inspiration for "Pan's Lbyrunth" I find his stories incredibly moving and complex. He tackles existencial subjects with the same ease as he does political ones ("The Sword and the Idol") or purely poetical musing asobjects or dead cities reminiscence about their human "owners" fate.

The "Inner Lands" were a source of inspiration for the world Ophelia longs to belong to in PL. I am glad you enjoy the tales of LD. Are you familiar with the many "Lost Worlds" of the poet laurate Clasrk Ashton Smith??

Best

GDT


FarFromHome
Valinor


Jun 3 2008, 10:17am


Views: 1394
It's not just us


In Reply To
Familiarity is comforting... Most people are uncomfortable trying new things. ... And in the end it is indeed our fault. The Hollywood moguls only give us what we want.



I think Sturgeon's second law ("90% of everything is crud") has always held. Most of the stuff people make is safe, derivative, and unimaginative. That's what most people are comfortable with most of the time. It's the other 10% (which might be a high estimate!) that stands out and gives those other 90% of the folks something new to copy - once everyone's got used to it and knows it's now "safe".

The situation always looks worse in the present, because the past has a way of filtering out the second-rate stuff so that when we look back we only see the innovators and creators who changed tastes or attitudes. There were certain periods of high creativity in the past (Renaissance Italy for example) but for the most part I imagine that no matter when you lived, you'd have found the 90%-crud rule was pretty much the norm.

...and the sails were drawn up, and the wind blew,
and slowly the ship slipped away down the long grey firth;
and the light of the glass of Galadriel that Frodo bore
glimmered and was lost.


ShadoFaxs
Rivendell

Jun 3 2008, 10:34am


Views: 913
Darn, and I was so looking forward to...

...the flood of furious, frantic posts lamenting Guillermo Hellboy, the comic book director getting his bloody mits on The Precious. I can imagine even now the screams of protest decrying neon hues in Mirkwood. After all, the two movies are sooooo much alike, no?.What the heck was PJ thinking??!!

Well - really! I mean, it's been nearly ten years since us old timers were fielding protestations of horror over Peter "Braindead" Jackson lensing LOTR. Dude, there were only twenty-six of us Americans had even seen Heavenly Creatures. We may never get this much amusement again!! And you're trying to forestall the fun? Smile

Seriously, that was quite the pre-emptive strike. It's always a pleasure and a privelege to hear from a film's creator. We're thrilled and delighted to receive every little nugget of information you choose to share with us. We hang on your every word. Wooden puppets - OOH LA! I'm drooling in anticipation. I really am. My favorite GDT films are Devil's Backbone and Pan's, but wild horses couldn't keep from HB2.

If The Hobbit association doesn't bring Hellboy2 at least another $80 million just through curiosity, I will be the most surprised fangirl in Hendricks County USA.

I've seen your every movie starting with Cronos. I know you've got much more than just comics inside your head. In fact, as an old art student, I'm constantly amazed by your frame of reference. Your notebooks are - fabulous.

I can't wait to be surprised by HB2, and I want to be surprised by The Hobbit. I don't know exactly what we're gonna get, except that, with a trusted team at the helm, it is going to be wonderful. Of course I love the Middle Earth created by PJ and team Weta. All I can tell you is that I don't expect ME to look like the Hellboy universe - or The Devil's Backbone. Viva la difference!

Go promote the heck out of HB2 _ I'm sure it will be a great success. And thank you for posting.


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Jun 3 2008, 2:31pm


Views: 874
pssst...

I think this is for you!!! *squeeeeeee*

http://newboards.theonering.net/...=forum_view_expanded;



sample sample
Trust him... The Hobbit is coming!

"Barney Snow was here." ~Hug like a hobbit!~ "In my heaven..."


TORn's Observations Lists


Annael
Half-elven


Jun 3 2008, 2:31pm


Views: 831
well


Quote
I have often wondered why people (the press, moviegoers, Hollywood) want so desperately to classify and label artists. Why is it assumed that these great talents can only do one thing?


For the same reason people stereotype others, I imagine: laziness. It's so much easier to label someone and assume you therefore know all about them than to take the time to get to know & understand them. For example, if you couldn't label someone's religion or politics, think of how much time it would take to get a handle on what they thought or believed! And if you were a Hollywood "suit" looking only to repeat a successful formula, you wouldn't be looking for the new & innovative.

I'm excited about Hellboy II. I was never a comics person before, but others on this board - MrCere in particular - have taught me to love graphic novels and the movies that reflect them.

The most that we can do for one another
Is let our blunders and our blind mischances
Argue a certain brusque abrupt compassion

- Adrienne Rich
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NARF and member of Deplorable Cultus since 1967

(This post was edited by Annael on Jun 3 2008, 2:32pm)


grammaboodawg
Immortal


Jun 3 2008, 2:42pm


Views: 841
My one regret

is that I didn't see Hellboy 1 at the theatre. Some films are "meant" to live on the big screen, and HB1 was definitely that! It has become one of my companions when I'm doing extensive work on the computer (TORn-related, of course ;), and I still delight in so many of the parts, I'm afraid I end up distracted and 20 minutes later realize I've gotten nothing done! I can't wait to see HB2!! Your description has me intrigued. I'll have to take the day off of work and be in line as soon as it hits the theatres!

Just as I have not transferred Peter Jackson's previous works into The Lord of the Rings, I have no problem with your presentation of The Hobbit as a stand-alone piece (as well as Film2); but your sensitivity to fore-warn us makes me smile. I can't image the anticipation your must be going through as you complete the flurry of work finishing HB2 and prepare to relocate (avoiding the dratted frequent-flying) and dive headlong into this world. How exciting! I'm so thrilled that we're able to communicate and share this with you... and you with us. This is going to be quite an adventure!



sample sample
Trust him... The Hobbit is coming!

"Barney Snow was here." ~Hug like a hobbit!~ "In my heaven..."


TORn's Observations Lists


Voorhas
Lorien


Jun 3 2008, 3:35pm


Views: 956
Clark Ashton Smith

Thanks very much for the response...I've read some of Smith's "Tales of Zothique" (he had such a flair for names, like Tolkien really) and loved them. It's criminal that you can't walk into a bookstore and buy a deluxe leather-bound edition of that stuff.

Breaking into early (pulp!) fantasy is like setting off an avalanche: a reader might start with Lovecraft, which leads to Dunsany, which leads to Machen, which leads to weird things like The Worm Ouroboros or The House on the Borderlands. That's what happened to me, anyway. So many of those books and authors are neglected or forgotten...but it's such a thrill to discover an 80-year-old story that can thrill, enchant, or terrify. Like finding buried treasure, in a way.

It's also interesting to me that authors like Tolkien didn't exactly exist in a vacuum...apart from his scholarly and linguistic influences, he admitting to "rather liking" Howard's Conan stories (in an interview with L. Sprague de Camp). There was a fantasy tradition that he was aware of, and familiar with to some degree.

"They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." -- E.A. Poe

(This post was edited by Voorhas on Jun 3 2008, 3:40pm)


Voorhas
Lorien


Jun 3 2008, 3:37pm


Views: 852
Thanks!//

 

"They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." -- E.A. Poe


deej
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 5:01pm


Views: 831
I just watched 'Cronos'.

It is a gorgeous film! I don't know that I would catagorize it with typical vampire films, but if you do like those movies and want to see something a little different then I think you would enjoy it a lot. Plus, Ron Perlman is in it, which is never a bad thing!


"...and back again."



deej
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 5:09pm


Views: 831
Mike Mignola's graphic novels

I would highly recommend anyone that enjoyed the first 'Helboy' film and is going to see 'Hellboy 2' check out the graphic novels by Mike Mignola. They are a lot of fun to read, and to me are like a cross between old 50's pulp novels and Saturday afternoon 'Creature Features'. There is also a spin-off comic called 'B.P.R.D', (Bureau of Paranormal Research and Development) which is a lot of fun to read.


"...and back again."



deej
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 5:16pm


Views: 850
Stephen King is a good example

He started out writing "horror" novels, but has gone on to write some really wonderful non-genre stories like 'Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption' , 'The Body' (made into the film 'Stand by Me'), and 'Dolores Clayborne'. As popular as he may be, I don't think he'll ever be taken seriously by the literary community because of the 'horror' tag. Which is a shame.


"...and back again."



Darkstone
Immortal


Jun 3 2008, 5:34pm


Views: 806
Yes

A lot of writers will use pseudonyms for their "non-standard" work so that it may be judged on its own merits.

However, it's a double-edged sword. Stephen King's own experiment with his Richard Bachman books revealed that indeed a well-know author's name on a book will sell ten times more copies than the exact same book published under the name of an unknown writer.

******************************************
The audacious proposal stirred his heart. And the stirring became a song, and it mingled with the songs of Gil-galad and Celebrian, and with those of Feanor and Fingon. The song-weaving created a larger song, and then another, until suddenly it was as if a long forgotten memory woke and for one breathtaking moment the Music of the Ainur revealed itself in all glory. He opened his lips to sing and share this song. Then he realized that the others would not understand. Not even Mithrandir given his current state of mind. So he smiled and simply said "A diversion.”



Bilbo the Rover
The Shire


Jun 3 2008, 5:52pm


Views: 838
In Fan Boy Heaven !

Let see, I've been a devotee of "The Hobbit" since I first read it in 1975, a fan of Hellboy since the beginning AND Guillermo's movies ! When I found out he was going to direct the first Hellboy movie I was ecstatic ! He was my ONLY choice after Peter and Fran to direct the Hobbit and now that it's come to fruition ...what can I say ! I'm busting ! to have Hellboy II coming out in July is the cherry on top ! So much to look forward to ! Thank you Guillermo !

Photobucket


MrCere
Sr. Staff


Jun 3 2008, 9:25pm


Views: 775
Nice fresh take GMa {NT}

 

I have no choice but to believe in free will.

The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie




One Ringer
Tol Eressea


Jun 3 2008, 9:59pm


Views: 760
That's good ot hear . . .

I'm glad to hear this. As great as Pan's Labyrinth and Hellboy are, the style wouldn't work for The Hobbit. Besides, I kind of figured you would have a different style. Thanks for the confirmation! Smile

"WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN"

Did you ever wish certain moments from LOTR could've made it to the screen? Have you ever imagined what would have happened if all of the original writings from the script actually made it to the films? Well, "What Could Have Been" is the right discussion for you! Starting this summer will be a series of topics about what could have been in "The Lord of the Rings Trilogy". Be on the lookout, and be sure to join in on the fun!


Dúnedain
Registered User

Jun 3 2008, 10:25pm


Views: 961
Please


Quote
I think its all well and good that Hellboy wants to protect the humans, but since I'm a Lovecraftian misanthrope, maybe the fairies would do a better job with keeping the world in order than our resource guzzling, environmentally destructive kin.


Oh Lord.



merklynn
Lorien


Jun 3 2008, 10:58pm


Views: 929
Hey, go evil elves, that's what I say! //

 



Guillermo
Rivendell

Jun 3 2008, 11:47pm


Views: 1456
Funny-

I adore Pulp Horror, Wandrei, Seabury Quinn etc and I agree, they led me to Machen, Blackwood, WHHodgson, Dunsany, Oscar Wilde, Victor Hugo, Dickens, Borges, Gombrowicz, Rulfo, Yanez, Quiroga, Stevenson, etc and those in turn to the rest of my mushrooming shelves... Just in the way Kirby, Wrightson, Corben, Moebius will then lead you to Hogarth, Wyeth, Parrish and then Bacon, Bocklin, Redon, Rops, etc

reaidng or loving art should be joyful arts and the inroads through genre are the most glorious to experience...

Best

GDT


(This post was edited by Guillermo on Jun 3 2008, 11:49pm)


Bilbo the Rover
The Shire


Jun 3 2008, 11:53pm


Views: 929
Am I alone in....

I always looked at "The Hobbit" as a journey into a dark fairy tale, there is true horror to be found in those pages, giant spiders, a werebear and to top it off a DRAGON ! Am I alone in this ? Where as LOTR was the "Iliad" ...the Hobbit is the "Odyssey". I never worry that GDT's style and vision will be the same for every movie he directs, I am so excited to see his vision for Middle Earth !

Photobucket

(This post was edited by Bilbo the Rover on Jun 3 2008, 11:55pm)


bowencm
Rivendell

Jun 4 2008, 2:03am


Views: 717
Class Act...

What a class act giving folks a head's up regarding the texture of the upcoming HellBoy II film...we all appreciate the frequency at which you touch base...I feel like we're all apart of the process now! Thanks GDT! :-)


merklynn
Lorien


Jun 4 2008, 2:39am


Views: 755
You're not alone...

The Riddles in the Dark is going to be the key scene I think in terms of creepiness. I always found that the most disturbing scene, because unlike giant spiders, dragons, wolves, and goblins, being ALONE in the dark cave with a twisted cannibal lurking just inches away is pretty damn intimately terrifying. Hearing Gollum speak through a choked voice in a mixture of poetry and gibberish as he debates over eating you and talks about his "preciousss". Trying desperately to get out of this doomed situation of claustropbia while being one on one with something half unseen yet psychotic. This is a creepy creepy scene, for me more so than any other. And I think it fits Guillermo tastes and sensitivies perfectly. Yes, The Hobbit could work as light, or as dark, and if they walk the dark path then it must still retain its light through Bilbo. My preferences is definitely for dark. And I'm quite happy with PG 13.


ArathornJax
Lorien


Jun 4 2008, 2:40am


Views: 717
Creativity and Uniqueness

With any artist I think you may see some common elements, but the goal is for its creation to be unique to itself. Why else would anyone want to create something with each movie (or with music, painting etc)? The public would tire of a repetitive performance and where is the fun in that for the director/creator (and I know that the great JRR Tolkien is the creator, but in this sense I mean the creator of this movie adaptation)? There is none. So anyone who says that HB, HBII and Pans sets something for The Hobbit does not understand the process or motivation behind creative works in my opinion, and the goal of that movie/project being unique. I look forward to seeing GDT's adaptation of The Hobbit and am excited because of the depth of his creativity which is evident from his past projects. That is what excites me about having him on board. Again, his creative genius gives me great confidence in the final product which I know will be a unique item to itself.

" . . . (we are ) too engrossed in thinking of everything as a preparation or training or making one fit -- for what? At any minute it is what we are and are doing, not what we plan to be and do that counts."

J.R.R. Tolkien in his 6 October 1940 letter to his son Michael Tolkien.




merklynn
Lorien


Jun 4 2008, 2:50am


Views: 729
Does that mean that Sam Raimi might have been good for TH despite his resume? //

 


ArathornJax
Lorien


Jun 4 2008, 3:50am


Views: 682
Depends

does he have the depth of creativity needed to make this film unique and to put his own mark on it, while tying it with the Trilogy? IMHO we have the director and visionary we need.

" . . . (we are ) too engrossed in thinking of everything as a preparation or training or making one fit -- for what? At any minute it is what we are and are doing, not what we plan to be and do that counts."

J.R.R. Tolkien in his 6 October 1940 letter to his son Michael Tolkien.




Kangi Ska
Half-elven


Jun 4 2008, 3:54am


Views: 692
A Question


In Reply To

"Does that mean that Sam Raimi might have been good for TH despite his resume?"

I do not understand your leap to this in response to what ArathornJax stated.
Could you elaborateplease.

Kangi Ska


Kelvarhin
Half-elven


Jun 4 2008, 5:05am


Views: 998
Hmm tough choice Merklynn

*one hand* Sex and the City *other hand* Hell-boy II No comp I'd go to Hell-boy II too LOL

Agree with your other points too btw Wink

*hugs* Kelvarhin


There he stood
Proud and solemn
Yet happy and gay
Kelvarhin's Universe


MrCere
Sr. Staff


Jun 4 2008, 5:21am


Views: 713
I would love to see Raimi's "Hobbit"

I will love seeing GDT's but if it were up to me there would be two separate Hobbit productions and I would love to see what Raimi brings. Each vision would be unique.

I have no choice but to believe in free will.

The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie
The cake is a lie




Sunflower
Valinor

Jun 4 2008, 5:40am


Views: 691
I think

though, that when we are children or still quite young, we are much more open to different genres and experiences; and the older we get, oftentimes the more set in our reading habits we become, even as we become more set in our ways. Hopefully, we retain some of that spirit of innocence, openness, adventurousness and curiosity as we age, but more often than not, by the time many people reach their thirties they become more cautious in their habits and outlook on life, even as, in their reading habits , they prefer to seek out things that fit within their own preferred genre.

From the sound of it, the pairing of such disparate literary characters as Kirby, Victor Hugo, and Oscar Wilde would be a strange one, to an adult, anyway. But it is never too late, I guess, to begin a new literary quest. I have read all of the "mainstream" authors in your list (though completing the full Dickens canon would require a year by itself!, and finishing all of Les Miserables took me almost that long..lol...no, j/k, it was reading :'War And Peace" that took almost a year...yes, I actually have read the whole thing, inspired to do so by the viewing of Sergei Bondarchuk's masterpiece of cinematic adaptation of that book in the '60s.)

I guess you have inspired me to attempt to begin an exploration of the pulp fiction genre....not the first choice for a 30-something American woman, I guess:). But I must have been the only 7-yr-old girl in the State of Michigan with a Conan the Barbarian comic collection, so...

The real world around us grows increasingly surreal; and often the headlines inspire feelings of foreboding and dread; so I think diving into something (on the surface, anyway) completely escapist right now sounds about right.

I was going to start with At The Mountains of Madness, (just the title gives me goosebumps) but maybe there is a progressive order you could recommend to a newcomer to the genre, Sir?

And I can't resist the urge to drop this in....someone recently wondered if you would depict the scene in which Smaug eats the poor ponies. Of course I do not expect a literal rendition of this, not even in an "intense" PG-13 film (!), and OF COURSE I don't expect an answer from you to this question!--but I have to admit, every time I listen to your commentary for Pan's Labyrinth I can't help but get a big chuckle at your, um, vivid recollections of working with horses. Of course you DO know that any journey into Middle Earth will be one filled with horses! Though I suppose you lucked out in this regard, not having to shoot LOTR....


(This post was edited by Sunflower on Jun 4 2008, 5:44am)


Solicitr
Lorien

Jun 4 2008, 11:43am


Views: 619
Not the reason


In Reply To
Movies have become too safe, and most of what gets made these days has to fit in with established formulas. I attribute that to the ownership of the studios - all, or nearly all, are owned by public corporations. Those owners are motivated by quarterly results, and they are under tremendous pressure to make their numbers, if not to beat expectations.


You're correct as to the symptoms, but not the disease. No 'corporate' studio today is any worse about formulaic sausage-making than Mayer or Thalberg or Goldwyn or Warner were.

The great age of 'risk-taking', formula-busting movies from the major studios actually was the 1960's-early 1970's, precisely when the studios were first bought out by corporations: in large part because the new owners and their Harvard MBA's didn't know what to do with their new acquisitions and so largely left them alone on the 'creative' side.


(This post was edited by Solicitr on Jun 4 2008, 11:46am)


Gethsemane
The Shire


Jun 4 2008, 1:16pm


Views: 632
those ears are far too pointy.

(in responce to GDT)

Tbh ive got more faith in both yourself and PJ when it comes to the look of The Hobbit and well then there's John Howe and Alan Lee (they're on board right?) their guidance and imagery will be a most valuable asset on this journey. Tbh I'm thinking look of the 2nd film will be the most delicate of the 5. Still all that said thank-you for communicating your thoughts its most appreciated.

it's good to have an end to journey towards, but it's the journey that matters in the end


Earos tar-Alqualonde
Registered User

Jun 4 2008, 2:37pm


Views: 604
good taste

I must say I admire your taste in reading! I'm always interested in anyone who is familiar with William Hope Hodgson.


Donry
Tol Eressea


Jun 4 2008, 3:54pm


Views: 569
I've watched Hellboy...

a few times, and it's one of 'those' movies that I will watch when I come across it on the television. I had not read the comics before, but knew of the character. Am looking forward to Hellboy II. Pan's was great, my gf and I sat and watched one night, thought it was a great flick. I am not worried at this point, but more interested to see if I can see anything that matches stylistically in the upcoming films...
Can't wait to see these two new films, I'm going in with enthusiasm, excitement and above all an open mind. Can't wait!

What's the matter, James? No glib remark? No pithy comeback?"


Mithrandír
Lorien


Jun 4 2008, 4:52pm


Views: 586
continuity backwards

Its great and very reassuring to hear this from you, i think we all can agree on that the hobbit should have at least some of the same colors, feel and mood as the rings..perhaps a little lighter for a good prtion of the first movie, but the second should portray the growing fear and darkness in middle-earth, wich should be reflected in the colors you pick for the film, digital grading etc. also the score is in good hands seeing as howard shore is back. If you want some advice on how to portray gandalv in the films, call me ;) some of us feels that gandalv was robbed of some of his powers in the rings films, at least some of us who have read silmarillion and unfinished tales.

Good luck!

Norwegian fan.


merklynn
Lorien


Jun 4 2008, 5:30pm


Views: 573
Elaboration...

No problem, I can see how that might be confusing. One of the things I was interpreting Arathornjax saying that a different director is not a bad thing because it just means a different adaptation, and that uniqueness is good. I agree with his comment, and was just being sarcastic in asking whether it would still be okay if Sam Raimi had been chosen instead of GDT. IMO that would have me a lot more nervous because I don't think Raimi's range is as broad and a lot of his movies I just don't like.

I differ with MrCere in that I would not be excited about Sam Raimi directing. :-D


Darkstone
Immortal


Jun 4 2008, 8:36pm


Views: 542
How about Tarantino's hobbit? /

 

******************************************
The audacious proposal stirred his heart. And the stirring became a song, and it mingled with the songs of Gil-galad and Celebrian, and with those of Feanor and Fingon. The song-weaving created a larger song, and then another, until suddenly it was as if a long forgotten memory woke and for one breathtaking moment the Music of the Ainur revealed itself in all glory. He opened his lips to sing and share this song. Then he realized that the others would not understand. Not even Mithrandir given his current state of mind. So he smiled and simply said "A diversion.”



NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Jun 4 2008, 9:02pm


Views: 641
I'd watch that!

I wouldn't expect it to be the Hobbit move I'd want to see, but it's intriguing to think what he'd do with it.

Imagine if he took the incredibly linear Hobbit story line and pulp-fictioned it. There's a movie there, no doubt.

Notta


NottaSackville
Tol Eressea

Jun 4 2008, 9:05pm


Views: 681
ACK! GDT says The Hobbit will be done using wooden puppets!!!

Shocked

Sorry, just causing trouble. Y'all can go back now to your real discussion.

Notta

(That ought to drag a few odd google searches to TORN....)


Darkstone
Immortal


Jun 4 2008, 9:12pm


Views: 534
In Supermarionation!!

Ah, I loved Fireball XL5 as a kid. It's on my Netflix list.

******************************************
The audacious proposal stirred his heart. And the stirring became a song, and it mingled with the songs of Gil-galad and Celebrian, and with those of Feanor and Fingon. The song-weaving created a larger song, and then another, until suddenly it was as if a long forgotten memory woke and for one breathtaking moment the Music of the Ainur revealed itself in all glory. He opened his lips to sing and share this song. Then he realized that the others would not understand. Not even Mithrandir given his current state of mind. So he smiled and simply said "A diversion.”



N.E. Brigand
Half-elven


Jun 4 2008, 9:39pm


Views: 537
"Kill Bilbo"?

(I feel that joke has beeen used before on TORN -- probably by you.)

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
We're discussing The Lord of the Rings in the Reading Room, Oct. 15, 2007 - Mar. 22, 2009!

Join us Jun. 2-8 for "Flotsam and Jetsam".


Kyriel
Forum Admin / Moderator


Jun 4 2008, 11:38pm


Views: 507
No worries here!

Just the difference in styles between Hellboy and Pan's Labyrinth (both of which I loved) - not to mention the high quality of all your previous movies - are enough to reassure me about your ability to do justice to The Hobbit. I am quite, quite happy to have you in the director's chair for this story I care so much about; and I look forward to hearing more from you about it right here. Smile

Those left standing will make millions writing books on the way it should have been. --Incubus

(This post was edited by Kyriel on Jun 4 2008, 11:39pm)


Eruthurin
Rivendell


Jun 4 2008, 11:55pm


Views: 505
Yeah!

+1 with you! .... :D :D :D :D
I've been GDT-fan since "La Hora Marcada", a TV show in Mexico that was on air in the 80's....
and so when "Cronos".... wow... simply I fell in love with his pictures!!!!.... not to mention the last ones!!!!...

:: All you have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to you ::
Tapatía Orgullosa de tener al paisano Zapopano en el Hobbit!.... :D


(This post was edited by Eruthurin on Jun 4 2008, 11:56pm)


deej
Tol Eressea


Jun 5 2008, 2:14pm


Views: 472
i'd kind of like to see Henry Selick's version

He did 'The Nightmare Before Christmas' and 'James and the Giant Peach' - a stop-motion version of 'The Hobbit' could be very cool if done by the right people.


"...and back again."



Darkstone
Immortal


Jun 5 2008, 3:49pm


Views: 519
I was thinking "Reservoir Dwarves" /

 

******************************************
The audacious proposal stirred his heart. And the stirring became a song, and it mingled with the songs of Gil-galad and Celebrian, and with those of Feanor and Fingon. The song-weaving created a larger song, and then another, until suddenly it was as if a long forgotten memory woke and for one breathtaking moment the Music of the Ainur revealed itself in all glory. He opened his lips to sing and share this song. Then he realized that the others would not understand. Not even Mithrandir given his current state of mind. So he smiled and simply said "A diversion.”



Glaurung63
Lorien

Jun 15 2008, 12:28am


Views: 491
Art....and Hellboy

Ah, Wyeth....N.C. is my fav for his book covers....Parrish is intense..now you have me on a hunt for some of those names you mentioned...

I just bought the Hellboy special edition dvd....totally cool...first time seeing your movie and I will post seperately about it.

I am now completely psyched for The Hobbit!


Nickey08
Bree


Aug 30 2008, 5:24am


Views: 433
I have to ask about the Earth Elemental and the Prince...

Dear GDT,

Both the Prince and the Earth Elemental seemed to be heavily influenced by a Japanese Animation background. The Prince was so beautiful in all of his movements, which seems inherent of the better quality Anime protagonists or antagonists. Whereas the Earth Elemental reminded me quite a bit of the Forest God in Hayao Miyazaki's "Mononoke Hime". I was wondering if you drew any of your influences from these sources?

Thanks!
-Nickey08

http://www.myspace.com/nickeydrayer